Word of the day

June 29, 2013

Imprecate – curse, wish harm upon; call down or invoke evil upon.


Rural round-up

June 29, 2013

Holding costs dairying’s challenge – Tim Cronshaw:

Keeping costs down could be the major challenge dairy farmers face in retaining New Zealand’s edge in global dairy markets.

Buyers had been making tougher conditions for food safety, sustainability, traceability and animal ethics and the list would grow, said Rabobank dairy research director Hayley Moynihan at the SIDE conference this week.

Milk-production costs were up “everywhere”, she said, and, with milk prices increasing to an expected $7 a kilogram of milksolids – about US50 cents a litre – other countries could be expected to want to supply this market. . .

Indian food demands might prove costly – Richard Rennie:

Pressure to comply with Indian dairy market requirements could hit farmers with higher feed costs as stock feed operators are forced to re-jig feed formulas and plant.

Dairy companies keen to get established in the growing Indian market may need to change stock-feed formulations and increase traceability around bought-in dairy farm feed.

Hindu religious leaders are pushing the dairy companies, saying imported milk products cannot contain animal tissue at any point in the process. . .

Cutting edge nitrate loss at SDF:

FOR MOST months of last year the Tomoporakau Stream leaving the Southland Demonstration Farm contained less nitrate than when it flowed onto the property.

While that finding from ground-breaking research by Lincoln University – with funding from Ravensdown – is good news for the farm and possibly the wider dairy industry, it is just a first year finding, stress the researchers involved.

“This is a really challenging but interesting project,” Lincoln University’s Prof Keith Cameron told a recent focus day held near the farm. . .

Tackling water limits in Otago:

IT’S GOING to take time and considerable investment to meet the measures Otago Regional Council is promoting to improve water quality, judging by the comments of two south Otago sheep and beef farmers to a recent Beef + Lamb New Zealand nutrient nous seminar.

However, both accept the need for change and are already taking steps to reduce their farms’ impacts.

At Taumata, Ken Campbell says he’s “pretty lucky” to have most waterways already fenced, with extensive planting, thanks to his parents’ hard work. . .

Big money for Busy Brook – Diane Bishop:

A five year-old pedigree Holstein Friesian cow is believed to have set a New Zealand record when it sold for $28,500 at the Southern Gold Medal Sale in Gore.

Taieri dairy farmers Nathan and Amanda Bayne, of the Henley Farming Company on the Taieri Plains, sold a two-third share in Holstein Friesian cow Busy Brook AP Rana for $28,500 to Australian dairy farmers Peter and Jessica Fullerton.

Sale manager Bruce Eade said it was the highest price paid for a Holstein Friesian cow this year, eclipsing the price of $24,000 paid for a Holstein Friesian cow at the Royal Presentation sale in Cambridge in June. . .

From Leaf Cutter Design:

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Saturday’s smiles

June 29, 2013

Three people were hoping to join the army and had to pass several tests first.

The first bloke went in and was asked by the recruiting office, What would happen if one eye got stabbed?

He said, I’d be half blind.

The officer then asked what would happen if you were stabbed in both eyes?

He said, I’d be fully blind.

The officer passed him and invited the second recruit in.

She put the same questions to him, got the same responses and passed him.

She then invited the third recruit, who had been listening at the door, to come in.

The officer asked, What would happen if one of your ears was cut off.

The recruit replied, I’d be half blind.

The office then asked, what would happen if both ears were cut off?

The recruit said, I’d be fully blind.

The officer said, That’s the first time anyone’s given those answers to those questions, could explain why cutting off your ears would affect your vision?

The Recruit replied, If I lost both my ears, I’d have nothing to hang my glasses on.


6/9

June 29, 2013

6/9 in NBR’s Biz Quiz.


Opportunities to the east

June 29, 2013

Quote of the day:

. . .Don’t forget: the boundaries between trade in goods and trade in services are becoming increasingly porous. If you measure NZ exports of services conventionally, our services exports amount to around a quarter of our goods exports. If you use the new models being developed by the OECD working in close collaboration with the WTO – that is ‘Trade in Value Added’ – 46% of NZ exports are services exports. It is just that our services are incorporated in our exports of everything from milk powder to niche manufactured products. The trade policy implication is clear: you need liberal access to world priced and first world quality services to be competitive as an exporter of manufactured, agriculture or any goods. . . Trade Minister Tim Groser.

This is an extract from an address to the Latin American Business Council.

He began by saying there are some fundamental lessons to be derived from our long-term success in Asia that we can apply in Latin America.

He concluded by saying:

. . . The objective is, at least in my mind, clear: we want free trade with all Members of the Pacific Alliance. The precise means or pathways to achieve this are another matter. But clearly, having already been accepted as an ‘observer’, with TPP in a mature state of negotiation, with the existing FTA with Chile already in the bag, and our proposal for a separate bilateral FTA with Colombia, we are in exactly the right space as the Pacific Alliance strategy unfolds.

I think it is exciting and could become the next ‘new project’ for NZ trade policy strategy.

There are opportunities to our east as those countries develop and grow.

The key to unlocking them is free trade.


Regions grow by taking opportunities

June 29, 2013

The first release of regional GDP data shows that regions which take their opportunities had better growth.

Taranaki, Southland, and the West Coast experienced the largest increases in gross domestic product (GDP) from 2007–10, while Auckland was responsible for over one-third of the country’s economic production, new research from Statistics NZ showed.

Statistics NZ released today GDP for 15 regions across New Zealand.

“This is the first official measure of New Zealand’s regional economies. It covers the 2007 to 2010 period and so provides a useful benchmark for future analysis,” regional statistics manager Peter Gardiner said.

“The increase in economic activity over the period was mainly centred in rural regions, reflecting a strong period for the primary industries. Manufacturing slowed in 2009, contributing less to GDP in urban regions.”

Taranaki’s economy increased 46.9 percent in size over the four years, the largest increase for any region, due to expansion in oil and gas production. Supporting industries such as construction and manufacturing also increased from 2007 to 2010.

The West Coast and Southland economies also increased in size substantially, 23.8 percent and 23.3 percent, respectively. This increase was driven by dairy farming, which lifted the South Island’s overall contribution to national GDP by 0.6 percentage points to 22.3 percent. . .

All the candidates in the Ikaroa Rawhiti by-election have campaigned against  mineral  exploration.

On mining and balance between jobs and the environment
Meka Whaitiri: Until we have some sound research that says [mining] doesn’t have any environmental impact, I can’t support that.
Marama Davidson: Ban it! Risky off-shore drilling, mining and fracking are all industries we want to get away from. Today we are releasing a package of green jobs for Ikaroa-Rawhiti that don’t ruin our environment.
Na Raihania: I am absolutely opposed to mining and drilling our Mother Earth. And this idea it will provide jobs for everybody is stretching it.
Te Hamua Nikora: As far as mining goes, we say frack off. No thank you.

 

Their region desperately needs better growth and the jobs that come with it but it is the industry which has boosted Taranaki’s growth that they oppose.

Oil and gas production and dairying, which helped Southland and the West Coast, are industries which the Green Party would like to see less of.

But Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce says the data shows the value of regions exploring all their economic opportunities.

“It shows regions who have taken their economic opportunities, such as Taranaki, Southland and the West Coast, have significantly increased their GDP – despite the effects of the recession and the global financial crisis.

“These are regions that have successfully balanced economic growth and jobs for families in their regions while looking after the environment.” . . .

Many regions have made further progress in the three years since the period covered by the regional GDP data, as New Zealand’s national economy has built momentum on the back of a number of more positive indicators and support from the Government’s economic programme.

“It is my expectation stakeholders will want to use the regional GDP data to compare and contrast the economic fortunes of different regions around the country, and ask themselves what lessons and opportunities there are for growth and jobs in their region,” Mr Joyce says.

“Nothing creates jobs and boosts incomes for New Zealand families better than business growth. For New Zealand to build a more productive and competitive economy, we need all of our regions to achieve to their potential.”

Opposition to growth opportunities is usually based on fear of environmental consequences and ignorance of what can be done to minimise potential problems.

If we want first world education, health, other services and infrastructure we need first world incomes.

That requires more growth and doesn’t have to come at the expense of the environment.


Saturday soapbox

June 29, 2013

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation.

You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse.


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