Word of the day

May 28, 2013

Crapehanger – a morose, gloomy, or pessimistic person; doomsayer; killjoy.


Wonderful words we should revive

May 28, 2013

Discussion with Jim Mora on Critical Mass this afternoon was sparked by 27 delightful obsolete words it’s high time we revived.

They include:

Groak – To silently watch someone while they are eating, hoping to be invited to join them.

Crapulous – To feel ill because of excessive eating/drinking.

Grumpish – Sullen. An alternative to grumpy.

Jargogle – To confuse, bamboozle.

Apricity – The sun’s warmth on a cold winter’s day.

Twattle – To gossip, or talk idly.

Grogonize – To have a paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on someone.

Cockalorum – A little man with a high opinion of himself.

Curglaff – The shock one feels upon first plunging into cold water.

Callipygian – Having beautifully shaped buttocks.

Fuzzle – To make drunk, intoxicate.

Quockerwodger – : A wooden puppet, controlled by strings.

Curmuring – A low rumbling sound produced by the bowels.

Lumming – : Heavy rain.

But it’s not just the words which appealed. Each is illustrated by a photo of an owl reacting to or looking like the word which adds to the fun.

 


Rural round-up

May 28, 2013

Alliance eyes Indian market:

The Alliance Group says the Indian market provides the group with a potentially lucrative export market.

Management from the meat company have just been visiting the country to get a better idea of the market and trading opportunities for the company’s Pure South lamb.

The company says it will be aiming its product at the five-star food service market in top hotels and restaurants. . .

Record returns delivered to New Zealand kiwifruit growers in the shadow of Psa:

Zespri’s annual results for 2012/13 show the highest-ever average Orchard Gate Return (OGR) returns of $51,153 delivered to New Zealand kiwifruit growers. However, the record result comes as the impact of Psa on individual orchards continues to be felt across the industry.

A highlight of the year’s returns was the performance of the Zespri Green category, which accounts for around 70 percent of Zespri’s exported volume. Average per-tray Green returns increased by 21 percent from 2011/12 to $4.62, their highest level since 2003/04. This strong result flowed through to Zespri’s highest-ever average returns per hectare for Green growers of $37,959. . .

Deer industry ponders name change for  venison in Europe:

The deer industry is considering whether to have another go at marketing New Zealand venison in Europe under the name Cervena.

It’s looking for a new approach to counter falling sales in its biggest export market, Germany, where New Zealand venison is under pressure from cheaper European venison coming from countries like Spain and Poland.

Cervena is an appellation for New Zealand farmed venison, developed about 20 years ago.

It’s been used successfully in the United States, as well as New Zealand and Australia. . .

Cardona sale marks first step in Singapore refocus

Vealls Ltd has named its preferred bidder for Cardrona Alpine Resort, the first step in a strategy to refocus on Singapore that is opposed by shareholder Elevation Capital Management.

Te Anau-based tourism company Real Journeys, whose businesses include the TSS Earnslaw and Milford Sound cruises, will make its first foray into skifields if the acquisition meets due diligence and gets shareholder approval.

Cardrona’s operating assets were valued at $A40.9 million, according to Vealls’ first-half accounts, and the skifield was the biggest source of earnings, at $A5.7 million, while the Australian company’s biggest asset, some $A57 million held on deposit with banks, generated just $A509,000, reflecting low interest rates. . .

Richie McCaw lends a hand to support launch Fonterra milk for schools in Christchurch:

Home-town hero Richie McCaw knows the milk being delivered to Christchurch’s Burnside Primary School children as part of Fonterra Milk for Schools will be top-notch. That’s because the rugby legend understands the value of dairy nutrition as part of a balanced diet.

“Throughout my career, my nutritionists have made sure that dairy is a big part of my diet. The message I’ve always got from them is that when it comes to keeping my body in top shape, a few daily serves of dairy should always be on the menu.”  
 
Richie says it is great to know that kids from his home town will directly benefit from having milk every school day with the help of Fonterra farmers, the commitment of local schools and the support of the Christchurch community.  . .

 

Double GOLD for Cirro at 2013 Decanter World Wine Awards:

Cirro is on ‘cloud nine’ after recently being awarded two Gold medals in the 2013 Decanter World Wine Awards for their 2012 Marlborough Sauvignon blanc and 2010 Marlborough Pinot noir.

Cirro wines are grown and produced in Marlborough, New Zealand. Winemakers David Tyney and Richard Green released their first vintage in 2009 after deciding to ‘join forces’ and combine their extensive winemaking experience. “From the beginning we wanted to create wines that epitomise the best of Marlborough, classic regional wines that over deliver on flavour and intensity” says David. . .


Forecast higher?

May 28, 2013

Fonterra will announce its forecast payout for the 2013-14 tomorrow.

Several pundits are suggesting it will be higher than this year’s $6.12 for a fully shared-up supplier.

That will be good news for suppliers and the wider economy.

Those competing for land-use,especially sheep and beef farmers, won’t be quite so happy.


Trans-Tasman tide turning

May 28, 2013

The Trans-Tasman job tide is turning:

ANZ has become the latest big Australian company to send more jobs overseas, replacing 70 call-centre jobs with positions in New Zealand as part of attempts to bolster profit through cost-cutting.

In another case of ”offshoring” by a big bank, ANZ last week told staff it would shift the jobs from Melbourne to New Zealand, where it is bulking up its 175-strong staff who respond to Australian customers’ queries.  . .

In another sign that our economy is strengthening while Australia’s is weakening, the New Zealand dollar may test 85 Australian cents this week as figures on Thursday have analysts mulling whether Australia’s mining boom is finally peaking, and as local interest rates become more alluring on this side of the Tasman.

This news might provide a psychological boost for those who get a kick out of Trans-Tasman rivalry. But Australia is a major trading partner and it’s better for us to have it doing well too.

Minding the baby

May 28, 2013

If a mother took a young baby into a casino late at night she’d be criticised and possibly reported to CYFS.

The debating chamber is hardly any more suitable a place for a wee one with a similar level of noise and artificial light.

If an official complaint was made about Nanaia Mahuta taking a baby into the chamber late at night, it hasn’t been made public but there’s been plenty of justified criticism of her and her party.

Rodney Hide points out that was nothing more than a poorly executed political stunt.

Mahuta complained, saying she was “forced” to attend a late-night Budget debate with her 5-month-old daughter but had to leave before the vote because her daughter started crying.

She complained to Speaker Carter, declaring: “No child should be in the workplace from nine ’til midnight”. Mahuta is exactly right. Babies at night should be tucked up nice and warm in bed. They certainly shouldn’t be sitting in Parliament.

But her complaint to Speaker Carter is grandstanding and false. Mahuta’s workplace is already the most flexible on the planet. It’s not the Dickensian workhouse that she portrays. There is absolutely no need nor requirement for a mum to be with her baby in the debating chamber until midnight.

Not one of Labour’s 33 MPs was required by Parliament’s rules to be in Parliament that night. The only requirement is for a presiding officer and a Government Minister. Two MPs on their own can conduct the business of the House.

Indeed, if no Labour MP had turned up the Budget and associated Bills would have quickly passed. Everyone would have gone home early. And Labour’s absence would not have made one jot of difference. The Budget and all Budget legislation were guaranteed to pass whether or not the Labour MPs turned up. . .

That Mahuta was in the house with her baby late at night was her choice, bad organisation by Labour Whips and/or a sign that none of her colleagues cares about her or her baby.

Whichever is the case it’s a very poor reflection on all of them and it’s done nothing for the cause of mothers in the paid workforce.

Andrei asked: Could a minimum wage, supermarket checkout operator take her suckling infant to her place of employment?

It’s not just a minimum wage worker or supermarket, what other workplace would be suitable for a mother and young baby? A classroom, a hospital ward, a courtroom, a radio station, a restaurant, an office, a factory?

I don’t think so.

Mothers working in few other places except for parliament would be able to take their babies to work, for the sake of the babies and the workplace.

It’s not being baby unfriendly, it’s simply that few workplaces are appropriate places for babies who need what they need when they need it. Late at night that includes quiet and low or no light.

Whatever Mahuta was thinking of it wasn’t her baby and if she was trying to make a political point on behalf of nursing mothers wanting to return to the paid workforce, she’s failed badly.

Instead she’s given ammunition to those who believe babies should be at home with at least one of their parents – for the sake of the babies if not their parents.


Forgiveness

May 28, 2013

“What does forgiveness really mean?” he said.

“Freedom,” she replied.

“For the forgivee or forgiver?” he asked.

“Both,” she said.

 


May 28 in history

May 28, 2013

585 BC – A solar eclipse occurred, as predicted by Greek philosopher and scientist Thales, while Alyattes was battling Cyaxares in the Battle of the Eclipse, leading to a truce. This is one of the cardinal dates from which other dates can be calculated.

1503 James IV of Scotland and Margaret Tudor were married. A Treaty of Everlasting Peace between Scotland and England signed on that occasion resulted in a peace that lasts ten years.

1533 The Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer declared the marriage of King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn valid.

1588 The Spanish Armada, with 130 ships and 30,000 men, sets sail from Lisbon heading for the English Channel.

1644  Bolton Massacre by Royalist troops under the command of the Earl of Derby.

1660 King George I of Great Britain, was born (d. 1727).

1754  French and Indian War: in the first engagement of the war, Virginia militia under 22-year-old Lieutenant Colonel George Washington defeated a French reconnaissance party in the Battle of Jumonville Glen.

1759 William Pitt the Younger, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born (d. 1806).

1774  American Revolutionary War: the first Continental Congress convened.

1830 President Andrew Jackson signed The Indian Removal Act which relocates Native Americans.

1853 Carl Larsson, Swedish painter, was born (d. 1919).

1858 Carl Rickard Nyberg, Swedish inventor, was born (d. 1939).

1859  Big Ben was drawn on a carriage pulled by 16 horses from Whitechapel Bell Foundry to the Palace of Westminster.

1860 One of the worst storms ever to hit the east coast of England, sank more than 100 ships and killing at least 40 people.

1863 American Civil War: The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first African American regiment, leaves Boston, Massachusetts, to fight for the Union.

1892  John Muir organised the Sierra Club.

1905  Russo-Japanese War: The Battle of Tsushima ended with the destruction of the Russian Baltic Fleet by Admiral Togo Heihachiro and the Imperial Japanese Navy.

1908 Ian Fleming, English author, was born (d. 1964).

1912 Patrick White, Australian writer, Nobel Prize laureate, was born (d. 1990).

1918  The Democratic Republic of Armenia and the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic declared their independence.

1920 Dennis Gunn was convicted of the murder of a postmaster and sentenced to death. In what was possibly a world-first involving a capital crime, Gunn’s conviction was based almost entirely on fingerprint evidence.

Fingerprints help convict murderer

1926  28th May 1926 coup d’état: Ditadura Nacional was established in Portugal to suppressthe unrest of the First Republic.

1930 The Chrysler Building in New York City officially opened.

1931 Carroll Baker, American actress, was born.

1934  Quintuplets, Yvonne, Annette, Cécile, Émilie, and Marie, were born to Ovila and Elzire Dionne, and later become the first quintuplets to survive infancy.

1934 – The Glyndebourne festival in England was inaugurated.

1936 Betty Shabazz, American civil rights activist was born (d. 1997).

1936 Alan Turing submitted On Computable Numbers for publication.

1937 The Golden Gate Bridge was officially opened by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1937  Neville Chamberlain became British Prime Minister.

1940  World War II: Belgium surrendered to Germany.

1940  World War II: Norwegian, French, Polish and British forces recaptured Narvik in the first allied infantry victory of the War.

1942  World War II: in retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, Nazis in Czechoslovakia killed more than 1800 people.

1944 Rudy Giuliani, 107th Mayor of New York City, was born.

1944 Gladys Knight, American singer and actress, was born.

1944 Patricia Quinn, Northern Irish actress, was born.

1945 John Fogerty, American musician (Creedence Clearwater Revival) was born.

1952  Memphis Kiddie Park opened in Brooklyn, Ohio.

1952 – The women of Greece gained the right to vote.

1961 Peter Benenson‘s article “The Forgotten Prisoners” was published in several internationally read newspapers was later thought of as the founding of Amnesty International.

1964 The Palestine Liberation Organization was formed.

1970 The formerly united Free University of Brussels officially split into two separate entities, the French-speaking Université Libre de Bruxelles and the Dutch-speaking Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

1974 Northern Ireland’s power-sharing Sunningdale Agreement collapsed following a general strike by loyalists.

1975 Fifteen West African countries sign the Treaty of Lagos, creating the Economic Community of West African States.

1977 In Southgate, Kentucky, the Beverly Hills Supper Club fire killed 165 people.

1978 Second round of the presidential elections in Upper Volta which was won by incumbent Sangoulé Lamizana.

1979 Constantine Karamanlis signed the full treaty of the accession of Greece with the European Economic Community.

1982 Falklands War: British forces defeated the Argentines at the Battle of Goose Green.

1984 Beth Allen, New Zealand actress, was born.

1987 19-year-old West German pilot Mathias Rust evaded Soviet Union air defenses and lands a private plane in Red Square.

1987  A robot probe found the wreckage of the USS Monitor.

1991 The capital city of Addis Ababa, fell to the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, ending both the Derg regime and the Ethiopian Civil War.

1995  Neftegorsk was hit by a 7.6 magnitude earthquake that killed at least 2,000 people, 1/2 of the total population.

1996  U.S. President Bill Clinton’s former business partners in the Whitewater land deal, James McDougal and Susan McDougal, and Arkansas Governor Jim Guy Tucker, were convicted of fraud.

1998 Nuclear testing: Pakistan responded to a series of nuclear tests by India with five of its own, prompting other nations to impose economic sanctions.

1999 After 22 years of restoration work, Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece “The Last Supper” was put back on display.

1999 – Two Swedish police officers were murdered with their own fire arms by the bank robbers Jackie Arklöv and Tony Olsson after a car chase.

2002 NATO declared Russia a limited partner in the Western alliance.

2002  The Mars Odyssey found signs of large ice deposits on Mars.

2003 Peter Hollingworth became the first Governor-General of Australia to resign his office as a result of criticism of his conduct.

2004  The Iraqi Governing Council chose Ayad Allawi, a longtime anti-Saddam Hussein exile, as prime minister of Iraq’s interim government.

2008 The first meeting of the Constituent Assembly of Nepal formally declared Nepal a republic, ending the 240-year reign of the Shah dynasty.

2008 – In West Bengal a train derailment and subsequent collision killed 141 passengers.

2012 – The discovery of Flame, a complex malware program targeting computers in Middle Eastern countries, was announced.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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