Word of the day

May 10, 2013

Cathexis – concentration or investment of mental energy on one particular idea, person, or object, especially to an unhealthy degree; the charge of psychic energy so invested.


Rural round-up

May 10, 2013

Animal Welfare Amendment Bill introduced:

Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy has introduced a Bill to Parliament today to update and strengthen animal welfare in New Zealand.

“The Bill will allow us to create enforceable regulations that set out how farm and domestic animals should be treated. It also gives wider powers to deal with people who breach welfare laws,” says Mr Guy.

“This comes from a comprehensive review of the Animal Welfare Act 1999 which found that while the principles are sound, the time is right to update and improve how it operates. This will make the legislation easier to enforce, and make it clearer and more transparent.

“It matters how we treat animals, both to ourselves and for our international trading reputation. This Bill will make that reputation even stronger.

“This is important to New Zealanders because around 68% of households have a pet, and we earn around $20 billion a year by exporting animal products such as meat, milk and wool. . .

Animal welfare case guilty plea welcomed:

Federated Farmers believes Milkpride admitting guilt in Rotorua today sends a strong deterrent message.

“With sentencing yet to be passed we are pretty much limited to what we can say,” says Willy Leferink, Federated Farmers Dairy chairperson.

“Farmers like me were troubled by what we saw and the public deserve to know it is not representative of dairy farming. In this case, farming was both on trial but farming was also part of the prosecution.

“I wish to acknowledge the work of DairyNZ’s early intervention team, Federated Farmers members and the Ministry for Primary Industries itself. . .

Farm health and safety and rural suicide high on agenda at conference:

Federated Farmers health and safety spokesperson Jeanette Maxwell will discuss the work to improve quad bike safety on farms and, more importantly, the Federation’s steps towards reducing the rural suicide rate in FarmSafe’s rural safety conference in Wellington next week.

“The politicians, policy makers and influential agri-business people attending the Rural Safety – A Forward Focus conference next Wednesday will have a very good opportunity to discuss what is happening with on-farm safety and what can be done to improve it,” Mrs Maxwell says.

“I am looking forward to hearing from Coroner Brandt Shortland about the coronial inquiry into quad bike safety and then participating in the stakeholder discussion on the future of quad bike safety afterwards. . .

It’s hands-on for Smedley cadets – Jon Morgan:

Of 80 young men and women applying each year to go to Smedley Station, the agricultural training farm running sheep, cattle and deer in the Central Hawke’s Bay hills, only 11 are chosen.

Once there they come under the spell of station manger Terry Walters, his wife Judy and their team of managers.

It’s two years they will never forget, says Walters.

“They play hard and they also work bloody hard.”

One word sums up the station and its training programme: Respect.

“It’s respect for the farm, the training staff, their fellow cadets, their gear, their dogs, their horse,” he says. . .

Southland farmers urged to register for DairyNZ Farmers’ Forum, 15 May:

DairyNZ’s national series of Farmers’ Forum is coming to Invercargill on Wednesday, 15 May.

The event is free to levy-paying farmers and their staff who are urged to register this week for the informative and practical seminars to be held at Ascot Park Hotel from 9.30-2pm.

Each year the Farmers’ Forum provides a great opportunity for dairy farmers to see how their levy is invested and to learn about dairy industry research and development work. . .

Massey University agricultural programme ranked 21st:

Massey University is celebrating having its agricultural programme ranked among the top universities in the world.

In the 2013 QS University World Rankings released this week, Massey University’s agricultural programme was judged to be the 21st finest in the world.

Vice chancellor Steve Maharey said it’s good news for Massey and good news for New Zealand given the importance of agriculture to the country.

Mr Maharey said the highlight of the ranking in his opinion was the five star ranking Massey received for its research in agriculture.

He said having the strength of the university’s research recognised will reverberate around the world. . .

Shortage Lifts Wool Market:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s Marketing Executive, Mr Paul Steel reports that the combination of a slightly weaker NZ dollar compared to most main trading currencies; restricted wool supply and recent dearer wool markets in other countries aided the lift for most types at this weeks’ South Island auction.

Of the 8,340 bales on offer, 83 percent sold. The weighted currency indicator was 0.46 percent down on last sale of 2nd May but started the day below this level, strengthening as the sale progressed. . .

And from Smile Project:


MRP shares open at $2.73

May 10, 2013

Mighty River Power shares started trading at 12:30 and opened at $2.73.

That’s a healthy premium on the listing price of $2.50 which poses a problem for LabourGreen.

They can’t complain about the money going into the pockets of people selling them because had it not been for their sabotage, more people would have opted to buy them before they listed and the listing price would have been higher.

If they can cost us this much money in opposition the thought of how much they could cost in government is terrifying.

 


Friday’s answers

May 10, 2013

Andrei and Alwyn posed the questions yesterday, thank you.

They also provided some answers, (and Andrei gets a bonus for humour in doing so for #3) but not all so both win an electronic batch of citrus slice for stumping us all.

It can be claimed when you leave the answers below.


Welcome boost in employment

May 10, 2013

The economy grew 3% last year and at last there’s a sign that the growth is leading to more jobs.

The drop in the unemployment rate from 6.9 per cent to 6.2 per cent in the March quarter is encouraging news, Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment Minister Steven Joyce says.

The Household Labour Force Survey released today showed that 38,000 more people were employed in the quarter.

“The result follows news the economy grew 3 per cent in the year to December and is another sign the economy is continuing to head in the right direction,” Mr Joyce says.
“While the fall in unemployment is a good result it may be a little too good as this survey is known to move around and we need to be cautious.” . . .

Caution is sensible. With surveys, like polls, it’s the trend which is more important than an individual result.

The result puts New Zealand in 11th place in the OECD, which has an average unemployment rate of 8 per cent. Our participation rate grew from 67.2 to 67.8 per cent and remains higher than Australia’s at 65.3 per cent.

Hours worked increased 3.2 per cent for the quarter – the highest since 1994.

“The Government’s economic management and Business Growth Agenda were praised last month by IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde who described the New Zealand economy as being ‘very stable’ and ‘very promising’ and a lot better than other parts of the world,” Mr Joyce says.

“The National-led Government is encouraging more investment right across the New Zealand economy as we know that nothing creates jobs and grows incomes for New Zealand families better than business growth.”

The left still think it’s governments which create jobs.

The government’s role is to get the environment right so that businesses have the confidence to employ people.


Crocodile tears

May 10, 2013

Green co-leader Russel Norman is still complaining about the float of 49% of Mighty River Power.

Mighty River Power’s shares have been transferred from all New Zealanders to corporates and a small minority of already well off New Zealanders, Green Party Co-leader Dr Russel Norman said today. . . 

Finance Minister Bill English last night revealed that only 113,000 individual New Zealanders bought shares in the Mighty River Power offer with an average purchase of $8220 worth of shares. The Government claimed over 440,000 New Zealanders had pre-registered to buy shares.

“There aren’t too many mum and dad investors with the ability to put down $8,220 on a share portfolio,” said Dr Norman. . .

An average is just that – some people would have bought more than $8220 worth of shares and others would have bought less.

What’s more 68% of applicants didn’t have a CNS indicating they were first-time investors and more likely to have purchased smaller amounts of shares.

But Norman is crying crocodile tears anyway.

As Hey Clint showed, the Green Party is delighted at their act of sabotage and it is the LabourGreen power play which put a lot of the smaller investors off buying shares.

When they list today the price is very likely to go up because institutional investors like ACC, Community Trusts and KiwiSaver funds will want more.

LabourGreen will no doubt complain about people making a fast profit but had it not been for their power play the float price would almost certainly have been higher.


Stepping stones

May 10, 2013

“If you put your mistakes down,” she said. “You can use them as stepping stone and walk over them.”

“What if they’re too big or slippery? he said.

“That’s when you ask someone who cares to hold your hand and help you,” she said.


May 10 in history

May 10, 2013

1291 Scottish nobles recognised the authority of Edward I of England.

1497  Amerigo Vespucci allegedly left Cádiz for his first voyage to the New World.

1503 Christopher Columbus visited the Cayman Islands and named them Las Tortugas after the numerous turtles there.

1534 Jacques Cartier visited Newfoundland.

1760 Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, French composer (La Marseillaise) was born (d. 1836).

1655 England, with troops under the command of Admiral William Penn and General Robert Venables, annexed Jamaica from Spain.

1768  John Wilkes was imprisoned for writing an article for The North Briton severely criticizing King George III.

1774 Louis XVI became King of France.

1775 American Revolutionary War: Fort Ticonderoga was captured by a small Colonial militia led by Ethan Allen and Colonel Benedict Arnold.

1775  American Revolutionary War: Representatives from the 13 colonies began the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

1796 First Coalition: Napoleon I of France won a decisive victory against Austrian forces at Lodi bridge over the Adda River in Italy.

1801 First Barbary War: The Barbary pirates of Tripoli declared war on the United States of America.

1824 The National Gallery in London opened to the public.

1833 The desecration of the grave of the viceroy of southern Vietnam Le Van Duyet by Emperor Minh Mang provokds his adopted son to start a revolt.

1837– Panic of 1837: New York City banks failed, and unemployment reached record levels.

1857  Indian Mutiny: The first war of Independence began when Sepoys revolted against their commanding officers at Meerut.

1863  Confederate General Stonewall Jackson died eight days after he is accidentally shot by his own troops during the American Civil War.

1864  American Civil War: Colonel Emory Upton led a 10-regiment “Attack-in-depth” assault against the Confederate works at The Battle of Spotsylvania.

1865 American Civil War: Jefferson Davis was captured by Union troops near Irwinville, Georgia.

1865  American Civil War: Union soldiers ambushed and mortally wounded Confederate raider William Quantrill.

1869 The First Transcontinental Railroad, linking the eastern and western United States, was completed at Promontory Summit, Utah with the golden spike.

1872 Victoria Woodhull became the first woman nominated for President of the United States.

1877  Romania declared itself independent from Ottoman Empire following the Senate adoption of Mihail Kogălniceanu‘s Declaration of Independence.

1897 Ethel Benjamin became the first woman in New Zealand to be admitted as a barrister and solicitor.

1893  The Supreme Court of the United States ruled in Nix v. Hedden that a tomato is a vegetable, not a fruit, under the Tariff Act of 1883.

1899 Fred Astaire, American dancer and actor, was born (d. 1987).

1908 Mother’s Day was observed for the first time in the United States, in Grafton, West Virginia.

1915 Denis Thatcher, British businessman and husband of Margaret Thatcher, was born (d. 2003).

1922 The United States annexed the Kingman Reef.

1924 J. Edgar Hoover was appointed the Director of the United States’ Federal Bureau of Investigation.

1925 – William Ferguson Massey, or ‘Farmer Bill’ as he was known by many, New Zealand’s second-longest-serving prime minister, died.

Death of William Massey

1933 Barbara Taylor Bradford, English writer, was born.

1940  World War II: The first German bombs of the war fell on England at Chilham and Petham, in Kent.

1940  World War II: Germany invaded Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg.

1940  World War II: Winston Churchill was appointed Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

1940  World War II: Invasion of Iceland by the United Kingdom.

1941 World War II: The House of Commons in London was damaged by the Luftwaffe in an air raid.

1941  World War II: Rudolf Hess parachuted into Scotland in order to try and negotiate a peace deal between the United Kingdom and Germany.

1942 World War II: The Thai Phayap Army invaded the Shan States during the Burma Campaign.

1944 Maureen Lipman, English actress, was born.

1946  First successful launch of a V-2 rocket at White Sands Proving Ground.

1946 Graham Gouldman, British musician and songwriter (10cc), was born.

1954  Bill Haley & His Comets released “Rock Around the Clock“, the first rock and roll record to reach number one on the Billboard charts.

1957 Sid Vicious, English bassist (The Sex Pistols) was born (d. 1979).

1960 The all-white All Blacks left for South Africa.

All-white All Blacks leave for South Africa

1960 The nuclear submarine USS Triton completed Operation Sandblast, the first underwater circumnavigation of the earth.

1960 Bono, Irish singer (U2), was born.

1969 Vietnam War: The Battle of Dong Ap Bia began with an assault on Hill 937 which became known as Hamburger Hill.

1979 The Federated States of Micronesia became self-governing.

1981 François Mitterrand won the presidential election and became the first Socialist President of France in the French 5th republic.

1993  In Thailand, a fire at the Kader Toy Factory killed 188 workers.

1994 Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as South Africa’s first black president.

1996  A “rogue storm” near the summit of Mount Everest killed eight climbers including Rob Hall and Scott Fischer, both of whom were leading paid expeditions to the summit.

2002 F.B.I. agent Robert Hanssen was given a life sentence without the possibility of parole for selling United States secrets to Moscow for $1.4 million in cash and diamonds.

2003 May 2003 tornado outbreak sequence.

2005  A hand grenade thrown by Vladimir Arutinian landed about 20 metres from U.S. President George W. Bush while he was giving a speech to a crowd in Tbilisi, Georgia, but it malfunctioned and did not detonate.

200 – An EF4 tornado struck the OklahomaKansas state line, killing 21 people and injuring over 100.

2012 – The Damascus bombings:  a pair of car bombs detonated by suicide bombers outside a military intelligence complex in Damascus, killed 55 people and injured 400 others

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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