Word of the day

April 25, 2013

Anzac – official acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps; a soldier in the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps; anyone, especially a member of the armed services, from Australia or New Zealand; a biscuit popular in Australia and New Zealand whose ingredients include rolled oats, flour, coconut, sugar, butter and golden syrup.


Rural round-up

April 25, 2013

Concerns For Sheep and Beef Farmer Viability Show In
rural Confidence Survey:

Results at a Glance

• Half of sheep and beef farmers are concerned about their business viability

• Dairy farmers are the most optimistic of the sectors, driving some improvement in overall rural confidence

• One in three farmers on the North Island say their farm is severely impacted by drought

Half of New Zealand’s sheep and beef farmers are worried about their ongoing viability as the impact of drought and a sharp fall in lamb prices over the past year take their toll, the latest quarterly Rabobank Rural Confidence Survey has showed. . .

Fonterra Announces Management Changes:

Fonterra Co-operative Limited announced today senior management changes in its Asia Pacific Middle East Africa (APMEA) business unit, including the departure of the existing Managing Director APMEA and the appointment of a new Managing Director for Australia.

Fonterra CEO Theo Spierings said a new leadership team had now been confirmed for APMEA, effective June 1. It included a new Managing Director Australia, Judith Swales, who joins Fonterra after leading Heinz across Australasia and before that the Goodyear Dunlop Business in Australia.

“Judith has considerable experience in delivering business turnarounds across a number of industry sectors, with a great understanding of consumer, customer and operations which will be critical in our Australian business,” said Mr Spierings. . .

Farmers to learn about environmental best practice:

Federated Farmers is proudly promoting regional Field Days for the Ballance Farm Environment Supreme Award Winners. Details of these upcoming Field Days are below.

“What Ballance Farm Environment Supreme Award Winners showcase, is how farmers are responsibly using the environment,” says Bruce Wills Federated Farmers President.

“While they say you cannot teach an old dog new tricks, that saying does not hold with agriculture. Farmers devour information and use field days to learn better ways of doing things.

“In March, I was among 200 farmers at the Smedley Station Field Day in Hawke’s Bay. This gives you an idea as to how popular these Ballance Farm Environment Award Supreme Winner Field Days are. . .

Dairy Awards Drives Progress In Industry:

The New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards is succeeding in its goal of recognising excellence among farmers as they progress in the dairy industry.
 
Three of the 11 finalists in the 2013 New Zealand Sharemilker/Equity Farmer of the Year competition are past entrants and regional winners in the New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year contest.
 
National convenor Chris Keeping says it is an exciting development in the awards programme, which has run in its current format since 2006 when the sharemilker/equity farmer, farm manager and New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions were brought together. . .

New Zealand Seafood Industry Welcomes the National Plan of Action – Seabird:

The New Zealand seafood industry welcomes the new National Plan of Action – Seabirds launched today by the Minister for Primary Industries, the Hon Nathan Guy.

“The Ministry for Primary Industries has involved many groups including industry and environmental NGOs, in developing the National Plan of Action. This collaborative approach has led to common-sense processes that will deliver results,” says Tim Pankhurst, Chief Executive of Seafood New Zealand.

“New Zealand is geographically a global centre for seabirds and the New Zealand industry is committed to maintaining its role as world leader in reducing interactions between seabirds and fishing. . .

Countdown to the Ultimate Rural Challenge:


The Grand Final of the 2013 ANZ Young Farmer Contest is just weeks away and the countdown is on. Tickets are still available for the different events, visit www.youngfarmers.co.nz for more details.

The Grand Final will take place between 16-18 May in Auckland at the Kumeu Showgrounds and SKYCITY, and there is sure to be something entertaining for all ages and interests.

The series of events kick off at 4.00pm, Thursday 16 May, with the Official Opening at Aotea Square. Here, spectators will be entertained with the first Head-to-Head Challenge and introduced to the seven Grand Finalists: Ian Douglas of Northern, Tim Van de Molen of Waikato/Bay of Plenty, Cam Brown of Taranaki/Manawatu, Aaron Passey of East Coast, Reuben Carter of Tasman, Matthew Bell of Aorangi, and Dean Rabbidge of Otago/Southland. . .

Karaka Million Payments Due Tuesday:

Payments for New Zealand Bloodstock’s $1 million Karaka Million– New Zealand’s richest race – are due next Tuesday 30 April.

Horses that were entered by the Entry Deadline of Wednesday 6 March have until 5pm (NZ time) on Tuesday 30 April to pay the Entry Fee of $1,750 + GST per nominated yearling in accordance with the Conditions of Entry.

Please note that any party who has not paid the nomination fee(s) by the deadline will remain liable for the entry fee but their yearling(s) will no longer be eligible for the Karaka Million 2YO or Karaka 3YO Mile. . .


Thursday’s quiz

April 25, 2013

1. What did General Bernard Freyberg reply to a British General who complained that New Zealand soldiers weren’t very good at saluting?

2. Anzac troops were at Gallipoli in an effort to control which strategic waterway?

3. When was Anzac Day first observed?

4.About how many New Zealanders died at Gallipoli?

5. How did you mark Anzac Day?

Answers follow the break.


And one woman

April 25, 2013

When the people of the Waiareka Valley who died in active service are honoured we remember 76 men and one woman.

She was Isobel Clark, one of 10 nurses who lost their lives when the troop transport ship Marquette was torpedoed by a German U-Boat in 1915.

She was only 30 years old.

She trained at Oamaru Hospital and a wall plaque which honours here was saved from the old building and is now on the wall in the new hospital.

She is also remembered by a memorial oak.

The other nurses who died in the sinking were: Marion S Brown, Catherine A Fox, Mary Gorman, Nona M Hildyard, Helena K Isdell, Mabel E Jamieson, Mary H Rae, Lorna A Rattray and Margaret Rogers.

The Christchurch Nurses Memorial Chapel was built in memory of those who died on the ship.

 


Memorial Oaks

April 25, 2013

In 1919 locals planted 400 oak trees in North Otago, one for every  serviceman from the district killed during the war.

They radiated from a hub in Oamaru to the countryside, planted where possible close to the home of the men they honour.

Many of the trees, or a replacement, still grow, providing a living memorial to the young men from out district, who went to war and didn’t return.

The trees are growing older as the men they commemorate didn’t.

 


Our sons as well

April 25, 2013

Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives.

You are now living in the soil of a friendly country therefore rest in peace.

There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours.

You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace.

After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well. – Kemal Ataturk.

The compassion and forgiveness conveyed in these words always moves me.

We received a very warm welcome when we were in Turkey a few years ago. A young New Zealander who lives there told us that this was normal, the people generally welcomed kiwis.

Would we be as warm and welcoming to them had it been they who had tried to invade us, even if it was nearly  100 ears ago?


April 25 in history

April 25, 2013

1214  King Louis IX of France was born (d. 1270).

1228 Conrad IV of Germany was born (d. 1254).

1284 King Edward II of England was born (d. 1327).

1599 Oliver Cromwell, English statesman, was born (d. 1658).

1607 Eighty Years’ War: The Dutch fleet destroyed the anchored Spanish fleet at Gibraltar.

1707 The Habsburg army was defeated by Bourbon army at Almansa in the War of the Spanish Succession.

1775 Charlotte of Spain, Spanish Infanta and queen of Portugal, was born (d. 1830).

1792  Highwayman Nicolas J. Pelletier became the first person executed by guillotine.

1792 – La Marseillaise was composed by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle.

1829 Charles Fremantle arrived in the HMS Challenger off the coast of modern-day Western Australia prior to declaring the Swan River Colony for the United Kingdom.

1846 Thornton Affair: Open conflict began over the disputed border of Texas, triggering the Mexican-American War.

1847 The last survivors of the Donner Party were out of the wilderness.

1849 The Governor General of Canada, Lord Elgin, sigeds the Rebellion Losses Bill, outraging Montreal’s English population and triggering the Montreal Riots.

1859 British and French engineers broke ground for the Suez Canal.

1861nAmerican Civil War: The Union Army arrived in Washington, D.C.

1862  American Civil War: Forces under Union Admiral David Farragut captured the Confederate city of New Orleans, Louisiana.

1864 American Civil War: The Battle of Marks’ Mills.

1873 Walter de la Mare, English poet, was born (d. 1956).

1898 Spanish-American War: The United States declared war on Spain.

1901 New York became the first U.S. state to require automobile license plates.

1905 George Nepia, New Zealand rugby player was born (d. 1986).

George Nepia.jpg

1915 New Zealand troops landed at Gallipoli.

NZ troops land at Gallipoli
The start of the Battle of Gallipoli – trrops from Australia, Britain and France were also part of the landings at  Anzac Cove and Cape Helles..
1916 Easter Rebellion: The United Kingdom declared martial law in Ireland.

1916 – Anzac Day was commemorated for the first time, on the first anniversary of the landing at Anzac Cove.

1917 Ella Fitzgerald, American singer, was born (d. 1996).

1927 Albert Uderzo, French cartoonist, was born.

1929  Yvette Williams First New Zealand woman to win an Olympic gold medal, was born.

1932 Foundation of the Korean People’s Army of North Korea. “4.25″ appeared on the flags of the KPA Ground Force and the KPA Naval Force.

1932 William Roache, British television actor (Coronation Street), was born.

1938 U.S. Supreme Court delivereds opinion in Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins and overturned a century of federal common law.

1939  DC Comics published its second major superhero in Detective Comics #27; – Batman.

1940  Al Pacino, American actor, was born.

1943 The Demyansk Shield for German troops in commemoration of Demyansk Pocket was instituted.

1944 The United Negro College Fund was incorporated.

1945 Elbe Day: United States and Soviet troops met in Torgau along the River Elbe, cutting the Wehrmacht in two, a milestone in the approaching end of World War II in Europe.

1945 – The Nazi occupation army surrendered and left Northern Italy after a general partisan insurrection by the Italian resistance movement; the puppet fascist regime dissolved and Mussolini tried to escape. This day is taken as symbolic of the Liberation of Italy.

1945 – Fifty nations gathered in San Francisco to begin the United Nations Conference on International Organisations.

1945 Last German troops retreated from Finland’s soil in Lapland, ending the Lapland War.

1948 Yu Shyi-kun, former Premier of Taiwan, was born.

1953 Francis Crick and James D. Watson published Molecular structure of nucleic acids: a structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid describing the double helix structure of DNA.

1959  The St. Lawrence Seaway, linking the North American Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean, officially opened to shipping.

1961 Robert Noyce was granted a patent for an integrated circuit.

1963 – a six-strong New Zealand civilian surgical team arrived in Qui Nhon, South Vietnam as part of the Colombo Plan assistance programme.

1966 The city of Tashkent was destroyed by a huge earthquake.

1972  Vietnam War: Nguyen Hue Offensive – The North Vietnamese 320th Division forced 5,000 South Vietnamese troops to retreat and traps about 2,500 others northwest of Kontum.

1974 Carnation Revolution: A leftist military coup in Portugal restored democracy after more than forty years as a corporate authoritarian state.

1975 As North Vietnamese forces closed in on the South Vietnamese capital Saigon, the Australian Embassy was closed and evacuated, almost ten years to the day since the first Australian troop commitment to South Vietnam.

1976 Chicago Cubs’ outfielder, Rick Monday, rescued the American flag from two protestors who had run on to the field at Dodger Stadium. The two people covered the flag In lighter fluid but before the match was put to the flag, Monday, sprinted in and grabbed it away from them.

1981  More than 100 workers were exposed to radiation during repairs of a nuclear power plant in Tsuruga.

1982 Israel completed its withdrawal from the Sinai peninsula per the Camp David Accords.

1983 American schoolgirl Samantha Smith was invited to visit the Soviet Union by its leader Yuri Andropov after he read her letter in which she expressed fears about nuclear war.

1983 – Pioneer 10 traveled beyond Pluto’s orbit.

1986  Mswati III was crowned King of Swaziland, succeeding his father Sobhuza II.

1988 In Israel, John Demjanuk was sentenced to death for war crimes committed in World War II.

1990  The Hubble Telescope was deployed into orbit from the Space Shuttle Discovery.

2003 The Human Genome Project came to an end 2.5 years before first anticipated.

2005 The final piece of the Obelisk of Axum was returned to Ethiopia after being stolen by the invading Italian army in 1937.

2005 Bulgaria and Romania signed accession treaties to join the European Union.

2005 – 107 died in Amagasaki rail crash in Japan.

2007  Boris Yeltsin‘s funeral – the first to be sanctioned by the Russian Orthodox Church for a head of state since the funeral of Emperor Alexander III in 1894.

2010: Flight Lieutenant Madsen,  Flying Officer Dan Gregory and Corporal Ben Carson, were killed when the Iroquois they were in crashed on its way to a Wellington Anzac Day service.

2011 – At least 300 people were killed in deadliest tornado outbreak in the Southern United States since the 1974 Super Outbreak.

Sourced from NZ History Online, Wikipedia & Manawatu Standard


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