Word of the day

March 29, 2013

Concomitant – naturally accompanying or associated; attending;  occurring or existing concurrently; an attendant phenomenon that naturally accompanies or follows something.


Rural round-up

March 29, 2013

Broaden Your Skills And See The Results – Farm Business Management Program Now Open:

Farmers looking to broaden their business knowledge to make their farm enterprise reach ‘the next level’ should apply for the Rabobank Executive Development Program, according to a recent program graduate, Guy Melville, of ‘Kairangaroa Pastoral’, Taihape in the North Island.

Applications have officially opened for the 2013 year intake of prestigious Rabobank Executive Development Program which gives leading Australian and New Zealand, farmers from a range of agricultural sectors, the opportunity to develop and enhance their business management skills.

Now in its fourteenth year, the program covers all aspects of rural enterprise management to help drive sustainable business growth, including strategic goal setting, negotiating and people management. . .

Brother and Sister claim top title in Northland Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Outstanding management of their “high input, very sustainable farming system” has earned Kokopu siblings Shayne and Charmaine O’Shea the Supreme Award in the 2013 Northland Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

Shayne and Charmaine’s dairy farm, 12km west of Whangarei, was described by Ballance Farm Environment Award (BFEA) judges as an aesthetically-pleasing, well-presented property that achieves excellent production at minimal cost to the environment.

“All aspects of the business are sustainable and profitable and there is a clear balance between the financial performance of the operation, followed by the environment and socially sustainable aspects.” . . .

Possible meat industry solution proposed nearly 30 years ago – Allan Barber:

In 1985 the Meat Industry Council commissioned a report from consultancy firm, Pappas Carter Evans & Koop, entitled Cost Competitiveness in Export Meat Processing which proposed a solution to the problems of the industry. Unfortunately, in view of the history of the industry since then, the recommendations were never implemented.

There were two key recommendations, the main one being the introduction of a tradable killing rights scheme to encourage the stronger competitors to take volume from the weaker companies or plants which would then close; the second recommendation was to abolish averaging of transportation schemes and to reduce meat inspection costs through structural and policy changes. . .

Smedley field day – Awesome – RivettingKate Taylor:

We hosted the East Coast Ballance Farm Environment Awards field day on Smedley Station and Cadet Training farm in Central HB yesterday.

It was a great day hosted by East Coast supreme winners Terry and Judy Walters, apart from the fact it wasn’t postponed due to rain (which obviously we would have been pleased about). . .

Global warming fat-cats exploiting drought-stricken NZ farmers’ misery – Lord Monckton:

Lord Christopher Monckton has hit out at those using the current drought situation in New Zealand and its serious economic effects on a number of farming families to further the cause of man-made global warming.

“It is repellent that shameless global-warming profiteers in government, the universities and some media are exploiting the misery and hardship of New Zealand’s farmers by fraudulently blaming the current severe drought on non-existent global warming”, he says.

“As the science and economics behind the climate scare continue to collapse, these whining fat-cats should be made to repay every penny they have extracted from taxpayers.” . . .

The evolution of freshwater management under the RMA – Nicola de Wit:

The enactment of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) combined around 70 pieces of legislation into one central environmental planning statute. The integration of a number of fragmented regimes was a significant step forward for environmental management in New Zealand. The RMA was also significant for its incorporation of the principle of sustainability; the purpose of the RMA is to promote the ‘sustainable management’ of natural and physical resources.

The RMA is consistently described as world-leading legislation – so why has freshwater quality been declining so rapidly in our lowland streams and rivers?

The Act contains two key protections for water. First, it allows people to take and use water for their reasonable domestic needs and to provide drinking water for animals, but it prevents people from using water for any other purpose, unless permitted by a regional plan or a resource consent. Secondly, it prevents any person from discharging a contaminant into water, or onto land where it is likely to enter water, unless allowed by a regional plan or resource consent. . .


Good Friday then and now

March 29, 2013

Today is the most sacred day in the Christian calendar.

When I look back to my childhood I remember going to church with my family in the morning and hot cross buns for tea in the evening but nothing in between.

We probably spent the day reading, playing or visiting or being visited. We didn’t have television and there wasn’t much else to do with shops and any places of entertainment like movie theatres closed.

These days Good Friday is just another holiday for many, although no doubt we’ll have the annual stupidity of Labour Department inspectors working to find retailers who shouldn’t be in some places although they could be in others.

As for hot cross buns, they’ve been in the shops since January.

I’ve maintained my one-woman protest against that by not buying any but am waiting for the dough for homemade ones to rise as I type.

They are for lunch with extended family which will be taking priority over blogging for the rest of the day.


March 29 in history

March 29, 2013

1461 Battle of Towton – Edward of York defeated Queen Margaret to become King Edward IV of England.

1549 Salvador da Bahia, the first capital of Brazil, was founded.

1632 Treaty of Saint-Germain was signed, returning Quebec to French control after the English had seized it in 1629.

1638 Swedish colonists established the first settlement in Delaware, naming it New Sweden.

1790 John Tyler, 10th President of the United States, was born  (d. 1862).

1792 King Gustav III of Sweden died after being shot in the back at a midnight masquerade ball 13 days earlier.

1799 New York passed a law aimed at gradually abolishing slavery in the state.

1799 Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born (d. 1869).

1806 Construction was authorised of the Great National Pike, better known as the Cumberland Road, the first United States federal highway.

1809 King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden abdicated after a coup d’état.

1809 At the Diet of Porvoo, Finland’s four Estates pledged allegiance to Alexander I of Russia, commencing the secession of the Grand Duchy of Finland from Sweden.

1831 Great Bosnian uprising: Bosniak rebel against Turkey.

1847 Mexican-American War: United States forces led by General Winfield Scott took Veracruz after a siege.

1849 The United Kingdom annexed the Punjab.

1857 Sepoy Mangal Pandey of the 34th Regiment, Bengal Native Infantry revolted against the British rule in India and inspired a long-drawn War of Independence of 1857 also known as the Sepoy Mutiny.

1865 American Civil War: The Battle of Appomattox Court House began.

1867 Queen Victoria gave Royal Assent to the British North America Act which established the Dominion of Canada on July 1.

1870 Pavlos Melas, Greek officer who organized and participated in the Greek Struggle for Macedonia, was born  (d. 1904).

1871 The Royal Albert Hall was opened by Queen Victoria.

1879 Anglo-Zulu War: Battle of Kambula: British forces defeated 20,000 Zulus.

1882 The Knights of Columbus were established.

1886 Dr John Pemberton brewed the first batch of Coca-Cola in a backyard in Atlanta, Georgia.

1900 John McEwen, eighteenth Prime Minister of Australia, was born  (d. 1980).

1902 William Walton, English composer, was born  (d. 1983).

1911 The M1911 .45 ACP pistol became the official U.S. Army side arm.

1916 Eugene McCarthy, American politician, was born (d. 2005).

1930 Heinrich Brüning was appointed German Reichskanzler.

1936 In Germany, Adolf Hitler received 99% of the votes in a referendum to ratify Germany’s illegal reoccupation of the Rhineland, receiving 44.5 million votes out of 45.5 million registered voters.

1941 World War II: British Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy forces defeated those of the Italian Regia Marina off the Peloponnesus coast of Greece in the Battle of Cape Matapan.

1942 Nazi sabotage hoax – career criminal Sydney Ross met the minister of national service, Robert Semple, in Wellington and claimed he had been approached by a German agent to join a sabotage cell and that Nazi agents had landed by submarine and were living at Ngongotaha, Rotorua. Ross was taken to see Prime Minister Peter Fraser, who referred the matter to Major Kenneth Folkes, a British intelligence officer brought to New Zealand to set up the Security Intelligence Bureau.

Nazi sabotage hoax

 

1942 The Bombing of Lübeck was the first major success for the RAF Bomber Command against Germany and a German city.

1943 Eric Idle, English actor, writer, and composer, was born.

1943 Sir John Major, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born.

1943 Vangelis, Greek musician and composer, was born .

1945  Last day of V-1 flying bomb attacks on England.

1957 The New York, Ontario and Western Railway made its final run.

1959 – Evangelist Billy Graham arrived in New Zealand for an 11-day crusade.

1961 The Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, allowing residents of Washington, D.C. to vote in presidential elections.

1963 Elle Macpherson, Australian model, was born.

1968 Lucy Lawless, New Zealand actress and singer, was born.

1971 – A Los Angeles, California jury recommended the death penalty for Charles Manson and three female followers.

1973 Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers left South Vietnam.

1974 NASA’s Mariner 10 became the first spaceprobe to fly by Mercury.

1982 The Telegu Desam Party (India’s regional political party) was established by N. T. Rama Rao.

1982 – The Canada Act 1982 (U.K.) received the Royal Assent from Queen Elizabeth II, setting the stage for the Queen of Canada to proclaim the Constitution Act, 1982.

1987 WrestleMania III set a world indoor attendance record at the Pontiac Silverdome with 93,173 fans.

1993 Catherine Callbeck became premier of Prince Edward Island and Canada’s first female to be elected in a general election as a premier.

1999 The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above the 10,000 mark (10,006.78) for the first time ever, during the height of the internet boom.

2004 Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia joined NATO as full members.

2004 The Republic of Ireland became the first country in the world to ban smoking in all work places, including bars and restaurants.

2008-  35 Countries & more 370 cities joined Earth Hour for the first time.

2010 – Two female suicide bombers hit the Moscow Metro system at the peak of the morning rush hour, killing 40.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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