Word of the day

March 17, 2013

Begorra – an interjection or mild minced oath regarded as a characteristic utterance of Irish people; a euphemistic alteration of  “by God”.


7/10

March 17, 2013

7/10 in the NBR’s Biz Quiz.


A toast to the Irish

March 17, 2013

You’ve got to give it to the Irish, theirs is the saints day which is celebrated most widely around the world, although most of the celebrations have little if anything to do with the St Patrick.

In light of that some Irish wisdom and toasts:

  • May your pockets be heavy and your heart be light, may good luck pursue you each morning and night.
  • May the roof above us never fall in, and may we friends gathered below never fall out.
  • A trout in the pot is better than a salmon in the sea.
  • As you slide down the banister of life, may the splinters never point in the wrong direction.
  • A friend’s eye is a good mirror.
  • May you live as long as you want, and never want as long as you live.
  • He who loses money, loses much; He who loses a friend, loses more; He who loses faith, loses all.
    May the road rise up to meet you,
    May the wind be always at your back,
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    and the rain fall soft upon your fields,
    and until we meet again,
    May God hold you in the palm of His hand.
  • May you have: A world of wishes at your command. God and his angels close to hand. Friends and family their love to impart, and Irish blessings deep in your heart!
  • May the Irish hills caress you. May her lakes and rivers bless you. May the luck of the Irish enfold you. May the blessings of Saint Patrick behold you.
  • May you have warm words on a cold evening, a full moon on a dark night,and the road downhill all the way to your door.
  • May your pockets be heavy and your heart be light, and may good luck pursue you each morning and night.
  • May your blessings outnumber the Shamrocks that grow, and may trouble avoid you wherever you go.
  • May the Lord keep you in His hand and never close His fist too tight.
  • May your neighbors respect you, trouble neglect you, the angels protect you, and heaven accept you.
  • May the sound of happy music, and the lilt of Irish laughter, fill your heart with gladness, that stays forever after.
  • May the hinges of our friendship never grow rusty. And our ale never turn musty.

May you enjoy the four greatest blessings:

    Honest work to occupy you.
    A hearty appetite to sustain you.
    A good woman to love you.
    And a wink from the God above.

May you live a long life, full of gladness and health. With a pocket full of gold, as the least of your wealth.

May the dreams you hold dearest, be those which come true. The kindness you spread, keep returning to you.

May the friendships you make, be those which endure; and all of your grey clouds, be small ones for sure.

And trusting in Him, to Whom we all pray; May a song fill your heart, every step of the way.


Rural round-up

March 17, 2013

Alumni awards honour Luxton:

DairyNZ chairman John Luxton has been honoured by Massey University at its Distinguished Alumni awards.

Luxton, QSO, a former MP and current Dairy NZ chairman, received the supreme honour, the Sir Geoffrey Peren Medal.

Named after Massey’s founding principal, the award recognises a graduate who has reached the highest level of achievement in business or professional life or who has been of significant service to the university, community or nation. . .

Alliance confident about lamb sales in northern markets

Southland-based meat processor the Alliance Group is quietly confident of a better season for meat sales in the pivotal Easter trade in northern hemisphere markets.

The last shipments of the company’s meat products for the Easter markets left New Zealand early in February and were still in transit, said chief executive Grant Cuff.

“We’ve only had early indications from those markets, but we’re more optimistic this Easter than we were last Easter,” he said.

Lamb prices were very high in northern hemisphere markets last Easter and customers were more pessimistic, with high unemployment and a lot of uncertainty around the world. . .

Working on quality – Terri Russell:

Southland meat processor Alliance Group is working on new initiatives after a visit from leading British retailer Marks and Spencer last month.

It was the retailer’s first visit since agreeing on an exclusive supply deal late last year. Marks and Spencer representatives visited the company’s Lorneville plant, near Invercargill, to look at processing techniques and product specifications.

Alliance Group, in partnership with Marks and Spencer, will work together to improve shelf life and quality of product.

Alliance Group general manager marketing Murray Brown said the initiatives offered opportunities for farmer-suppliers. . .

Five star treatment for Camelot cows – Michelle Nelson:

In the shadow of the Mid Canterbury foothills lies a modern-day Camelot, where something magical is happening – huge super cows are milked by robots, and a dedicated team of humans attends to their every need.

Camelot Robotic Dairy Farm is owned by the Beeston family’s Blumoon Trust, and is a place where animal welfare and sustainable farming practices are kept at the forefront of decision making.

At 26, Frances Beeston manages the state-of-the-art robotic dairy farm, home to the Blumoon Holstein Fresian and Triann Brown Swiss studs. She says life doesn’t get much better.

The daughter of Bryan and Annette Beeston, Frances grew up with elite dairy cows, and wasted little time thinking about where her future lay.

“I worked on the farm with Mum and Dad when I was a kid. I had pet calves and loved going out at night to check on cows at calving – I always loved the lifestyle,” she says. . .

Alien weeds feared in imported hay – Terri Russell:

Southland farmers aren’t sending hay north to support drought-ravaged farms – and they would only accept North Island hay if they were “desperate” for the feed.

Truckloads of Canterbury hay have been sent to farmers in the North Island this week to underfed livestock in the drought-affected north.

While transport costs and dry conditions meant Southland farmers had shown no interest in sending hay north, industry leaders said if the situation was reversed farmers would need to be vigilant about hay coming to Southland. They did not want unwanted weeds in the hay to spread through the region. . . .

DoC tries to leave none behind – Tim Fulton:

Canterbury conservator Mike Cuddihy has a favourite song lyric, “I’ll be holding all the tickets and you’ll be owning all the fines”. Tim Fulton meets a top manager at the Department of Conservation.

Some trophy hunters shoot the bull tahr but leave the females behind to breed in great numbers, Mike Cuddihy has noticed.

His incidental comment on wild game captures his view of responsibility for the “huge canvas” of the environment.

DoC will happily work behind the scenes in conservation but the onus goes in all directions, the Canterbury regional manager says.

In the South Island high country, where DoC is a large landowner rubbing shoulders routinely with farmers, the bush-talk has been of a fractious relationship. . .


WIll it be a bottom line?

March 17, 2013

In a speech typically high on emotion and rhetoric Winston Peters says:

We will use every ounce of influence after the next election and all the financial measures available to us to buy back Mighty River Power shares at a price no higher than originally paid for them.

The only way he can do this is to make it a bottom line in negotiations over supply and confidence with the party which will lead the next government.

It would mean that New Zealand First makes full state ownership of an energy company a higher priority than schools, hospitals, roads, irrigation and other assets.

It would mean that the party isn’t troubled by the prospect of sabotaging the value of public and private shareholdings and destabilising the share market.

It would mean that if New Zealand First held the balance of power, there would have to be another election.

The re-natonalisation of MRP would be a bottom line National wouldn’t accept.

And although David Shearer hasn’t quite ruled out buying back the shares in Mighty River he knows the cost and it’s one no party which wants to be regarded as a careful steward of the economy could contemplate.

If Peters is making it a bottom line he’s ruling his party out of government.

If he’s not then it’s just another example of his hot air.

 


It’s drizzling

March 17, 2013

We had a shower over night, just enough to wet the concrete.

It’s drizzling now but only just.

It will lay the dust and freshen things up.

If the  Met Service’s prediction is correct there’s more rain further north, but it will take a lot more rain in a lot more places than the 5mm in Kerikeri, which is forecast to be the wettest spot,  to break the drought.

rain


Sunday soapbox

March 17, 2013

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation.

You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse.

 

:) kindest, Boris


March 17 in history

March 17, 2013

45 BC Julius Caesar defeated the Pompeian forces of Titus Labienus and Pompey the Younger in the Battle of Munda.

180 Marcus Aurelius died leaving Commodus as the sole emperor of the Roman Empire.

624 Led by Muhammad, the Muslims of Medina defeated the Quraysh of Mecca in the Battle of Badr.

1337 Edward, the Black Prince was made Duke of Cornwall, the first Duchy made in England.

1473 King James IV of Scotland was born (d. 1513).

1756 Saint Patrick’s Day was celebrated in New York City for the first time (at the Crown and Thistle Tavern).

1776 American Revolution: British forces evacuated Boston, Massachusetts after George Washington and Henry Knox placed artillery overlooking the city.

1780 American Revolution: George Washington granted the Continental Army a holiday “as an act of solidarity with the Irish in their fight for independence”.

1805 The Italian Republic, with Napoleon as president, became the Kingdom of Italy, with Napoleon as King.

1834 Gottlieb Daimler, German engineer and inventor was born (d. 1900).

1845 The rubber band was patented.

1846 Kate Greenaway, English children’s author and illustrator, was born (d. 1901).

1860 The opening shots of the first Taranaki War were fired when imperial troops attacked a pa built by the Te Ati Awa chief Te Rangitake at Te Kohia.

First Taranaki war erupts at Waitara

1861 The Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946) was proclaimed.

1864 Joseph Baptista Indian Home Rule founder was born  (d. 1930).

1880 Lawrence Oates, English army officer and Antarctic explorer, was born (d. 1912).

1919 Nat King Cole, American singer, was born (d. 1965).

1920 Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, Founding Leader of Bangladesh, was born (d. 1975).

1938 Rudolf Nureyev, Russian-born dancer and choreographer, was born (d. 1993).

1938 Zola Taylor, American singer (The Platters), was born  (d. 2007).

1939 Battle of Nanchang between the Kuomintang and Japan started.

1941 The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC was officially opened by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1941 Paul Kantner, American musician (Jefferson Airplane) was born.

1942 The first Jews from the Lviv Ghetto were gassed at the Belzec death camp (eastern Poland).

1945 The Ludendorff Bridge in Remagen, Germany collapsed, ten days after its capture.

1947 First flight of the B-45 Tornado strategic bomber.

1948 Benelux, France and the United Kingdom signed the Treaty of Brussels.

1950  Researchers at the University of California announced the creation of element 98, which they named “Californium.”

1951 Scott Gorham, American musician (Thin Lizzy) was born.

1954 Lesley-Anne Down, English actress, was born.

1957 A plane crash in Cebu killed Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay and 24 others.

1958 The United States launched the Vanguard 1 satellite.

1959 Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled Tibet for India.

1960 U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Security Council directive on the anti-Cuban covert action programme that led to the Bay of Pigs Invasion.

1966  Off the coast of Spain, the Alvin submarine found a missing American hydrogen bomb.

1967 Billy Corgan, American musician (Smashing Pumpkins), was born.

1969 Alexander McQueen, British fashion designer, was born (d. 2010).

1969 Golda Meir became the first female Prime Minister of Israel.

1970 My Lai Massacre: The United States Army charged 14 officers with suppressing information related to the incident.

1973 The Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph Burst of Joy was taken, depicting a former prisoner of war being reunited with his family.

1976 Stephen Gately, Irish singer, musician, and actor (Boyzone) was born (d. 2009).

1979 The Penmanshiel Tunnel collapsed during engineering works, killing two workers.

1988 A Colombian Boeing 727 jetliner, Avianca Flight 410, crashed into a mountainside near the Venezuelan border killing 143.

1988 Eritrean War of Independence: The Nadew Command, an Ethiopian army corps in Eritrea, was attacked on three sides by military units of the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front in the opening action of the Battle of Afabet.

1992 Israeli Embassy attack in Buenos Aires: Suicide car bomb attack killed 29 and injured 242.

2000 More than 800 members of the Ugandan cult Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God died in a mass murder and suicide orchestrated by leaders of the cult.

2003 Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Robin Cook, resigned from the British Cabinet over his disagreement with government plans for the war with Iraq.

2004 –  Unrest in Kosovo: More than 22 killed, 200 wounded, and the destruction of 35 Serbian Orthodox shrines in Kosovo and two mosques in Belgrade and Nis.

2008 – Governor of New York Eliot Spitzer resigned after a scandal involving a high-end prostitute. Lieutenant Governor David Paterson became New York State governor.

2011 – Libyan civil war: The United Nations Security Council adopted United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973, authorising a military intervention by member states to protect civilians in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

Sourced from NZ History and Wikipedia.


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