Word of the day

October 24, 2012

Obloquy – strong public criticism or verbal abuse;  censure, blame, or abusively detractive language or utterance aimed at a person or thing, especially by numerous persons or by the general public; calumny;  discredit, disgrace, or bad repute resulting from public blame, abuse, or denunciation.


Rural round-up

October 24, 2012

For want of a name our agriculture flounders – Peter Kerr:

Every story has a name – except the one which describes our agriculture.

This, I argue, is one of the reasons we struggle to tell people around the world and in our cities about what exactly is and has been the basis of our farming’s comparative advantage for the past 130 years.

Let me provide an example.

We don’t start a story with: ‘This is about a wolf and a little girl and a grandmother who lives alone.”

No, we start, “This is the story of Little Red Riding Hood.” . . .

MPI’s Farm Monitoring Report forecasts income drops for diary and sheep and beef; Allan Barber:

MPI’s 2012 pastoral farm analyses, taken from the Farm Monitoring Report, show significant falls in income predicted for dairy, and sheep and beef, and an increase for deer farming.

The reports show typical income patterns based on information gathered from a representative sample of farm properties.

The 2011/12 year was profitable because of favourable growing conditions which saw a 10% lift in dairy production offset the lower payout, while higher prices for sheepmeat combined with better farm productivity generated an 18% increase in cash profit. Deer farmers are enjoying a period of price stability and good productivity. . .

Dairying women push through broadband challenge to access online training:

A professional dairy industry women’s group will deliver an online training programme despite limited access to high-speed internet services in many rural communities.

The Dairy Women’s Network is the premier forum for women working in New Zealand’s dairy industry. With more than 3100 members, it works to develop the leadership and business skills of women in a changing agribusiness environment. It does this by providing a range of training and networking resources.

Chief executive Sarah Speight said that as dairy women’s lives were getting busier, the Network needed be innovative in how it delivered training to allow members to participate without having to be in a specific place at a specific time. . .

Pax Fonterra, Pax:

Federated Farmers is counselling Fonterra Co-operative Group’s Board that now is not the time to start examining the cooperative’s governance arrangements.

“For once it would be great to have some peace within Fonterra,” observed Willy Leferink, Federated Farmers Dairy Chairperson.

“We want Fonterra’s chairman-elect, John Wilson, given time at the helm to show shareholders what he is made of. Fonterra must also bed-in Trading Among Farmers (TAF), so now is not the time to get ahead of itself. . .

And:


Young Farmers top 2000

October 24, 2012

New Zealand Young Farmers has passed the 2000 member milestone:

Founded in 1932 New Zealand Young Farmers is in its 80th year with over 90 Clubs around New Zealand.

 Only seven years ago membership sat at just 450 people. Since then there has been a steady increase year by year and to reach 2000 members is hugely significant and rewarding for this non-profit organisation.

New Zealand Young Farmers CEO Richard Fitzgerald says, “to reach 2000 members is an important milestone for Young Farmers. It has been many years since we have had this number of members so it’s a good sign the organisation is in a healthy position”.

In the early 90’s membership was last at where it is today and with the introduction of programmes such as AgriKids and TeenAg over previous year’s highlights the organisation is dedicated to growing the skills and opportunities of the younger generation and developing them into fully fledged New Zealand Young Farmer members.

Mr Fitzgerald says “the really exciting thing about this is what is going on within the organisation. Over the past few years Young Farmers has continued as a fun place for people to connect, meet their mates and it is also building the leadership and personal skills of these people too. It is a good combination and is working well”. . . 

Membership peaked at about 7,000 in the late 1970s and early 80s.

The decline began with the ag-sag of the mid to late 1980s and continued for more than a decade.

Passing 2,000 members is a remarkable turn around for the organisation which reflects well on the members responsible for recruitment and retention.

It is also a symptom of the resurgence of farming and farm support.

Young  Farmers is a social organisation where life-long friendships are forged but it is also a training ground for leadership.

The increase in membership good not just for Young Farmers and young farmers. It is also good for rural New Zealand.

If we could recruit those of the 2,000 plus Young Farmers who aren’t already Young Nationals it would be even better for the whole country 🙂


NZ easiest place to start business

October 24, 2012

New Zealand can claim another top spot, we’re the easiest place in the world to set up a business.

New Zealand is the world’s easiest place to start a business globally, the World Bank Group’s Doing Business 2013 report states, launched today. According to the report, it takes just one day and one procedure to register a private company in New Zealand. New Zealand is ranked overall the third most business friendly country out of 185 economies globally.

Included in New Zealand’s strong performance were positive reforms which improved access to credit information by allowing credit bureaus to collect positive information on individuals. . .

Setting up is just the start but New Zealand ranks well for doing business too:

Singapore topped the global ranking on the ease of doing business for the seventh consecutive year. Joining it on the list of the top 10 economies with the most business-friendly regulation were Hong Kong SAR, China; New Zealand; the United States; Denmark; Norway; the United Kingdom; the Republic of Korea; Georgia; and Australia.

Topping the list of economies that registered the biggest improvements in the ease of doing business over the last year were Poland, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Burundi, Costa Rica, Mongolia, Greece, Serbia, and Kazakhstan.

The ease or difficulty of setting up a business and doing business is important for attracting inward investment, creating jobs and economic growth.

Opposition MPs who want to complicate business, make it more expensive and/or difficult to employ people, increase compliance costs and meddle in the market could put all that at risk.

 


Aim of argument

October 24, 2012

Thought for the day:

The aim of argument or discussion should not be victory but progress – Joseph Joubert.


October 24 in history

October 24, 2012

69  Second Battle of Bedriacum, forces under Antonius Primus, the commander of the Danube armies, loyal to Vespasian, defeated the forces of Emperor Vitellius.

1147  After a siege of 4 months crusader knights led by Afonso Henriques, reconquered Lisbon.

1260  The Cathedral of Chartres was dedicated in the presence of King Louis IX of France.

1260  Saif ad-Din Qutuz, Mamluk sultan of Egypt, was assassinated by Baibars, who seized power for himself.

1360  The Treaty of Brétigny was ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years’ War.

1648  The Peace of Westphalia was signed, marking the end of the Thirty Years’ War.

1795 Partitions of Poland: The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was completely divided among Austria, Prussia, and Russia.

1812 Napoleonic Wars: The Battle of Maloyaroslavets.

1830 – Marianne North, English naturalist and flower painter was born (d. 1890).

1838 – Annie Edson Taylor, American adventuress was born (d. 1921).

1840 – Eliza Pollock, American archer (d. 1919).

1857 Sheffield F.C., the world’s first football club, was founded.

1861  The First Transcontinental Telegraph line across the United States was completed, spelling the end for the 18-month-old Pony Express.

1882  Dame Sybil Thorndike, British actress, was born (d. 1976).

1892  Goodison Park, the world’s first association football specific stadium was opened.

1901  Annie Edson Taylor became the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

1911 Orville Wright remained in the air 9 minutes and 45 seconds in a Wright Glider at Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina.

1912  First Balkan War: The Battle of Kumanovo concluded with the Serbian victory.

1913 Violent clashes between unionised waterside workers and non-union labour erupted two days after Wellington watersiders held a stopwork meeting in support of a small group of striking shipwrights.

Violence flares on Wellington wharves

1917 Battle of Caporetto; Italy was defeated by the forces of Austria-Hungary and Germany. (Also called Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo).

1917 The day of the October revolution, The Red Revolution.

1919 South Island explorer Donald Sutherland died.
Death of South Island explorer Donald Sutherland

1926  Harry Houdini‘s last performance.

1929  ”Black Thursday” stock market crash on the New York Stock Exchange.

1930 A bloodless coup d’état in Brazil ousted Washington Luís Pereira de Sousa, the last President of the First Republic. Getúlio Dornelles Vargas was then installed as “provisional president.”

1931  The George Washington Bridge opened to traffic.

1936 Bill Wyman, English musician (The Rolling Stones), was born.

1944  The Japanese aircraft carrier Zuikaku, and the battleship Musashi were sunk in the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

1945  Founding of the United Nations.

1946 A camera on board the V-2 No. 13 rocket took the first photograph of earth from outer space.

1947  Walt Disney testified to the House Un-American Activities Committee, naming Disney employees he believes to be communists.

1954  Dwight D. Eisenhower pledged United States support to South Vietnam.

1957  The USAF started the X-20 Dyna-Soar programme.

1960  Nedelin catastrophe: An R-16 ballistic missile exploded on the launch pad at the Soviet Union’s Baikonur Cosmodrome space facility, killing over 100.

1964 Northern Rhodesia gained independence and became the Republic of Zambia.

1973 Jeff Wilson, New Zealand rugby player and cricketer, was born.

1973 Yom Kippur War ended.

1980 Government of Poland legalised Solidarity trade union.

1986  Nezar Hindawi was sentenced to 45 years in prison, the longest sentence handed down by a British court, for the attempted bombing on an El Al flight at Heathrow.

1990  Italian prime minister Giulio Andreotti revealed to the Italian parliament the existence of Gladio, the Italian “stay-behind” clandestine paramilitary NATO army.

1998  Launch of Deep Space 1 comet/asteroid mission.

2002  Police arrested spree killers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, ending the Beltway sniper attacks in the area around Washington, DC.

2003  Concorde made its last commercial flight.

2005  Hurricane Wilma made landfall in Florida resulting in 35 direct 26 indirect fatalities and causing $20.6B USD in damage.

2006  Justice Rutherford of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice struck down the “motive clause”, an important part of the Canadian Anti-Terrorism Act.

2008  ”Bloody Friday“: many of the world’s stock exchanges experienced the worst declines in their history, with drops of around 10% in most indices.

2009  First International Day of Climate Action, organised with 350.org, a global campaign to address a claimed global warming crisis.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


%d bloggers like this: