Word of the day

October 21, 2012

Postprandial – during or relating to the period after dinner or lunch; occurring after a meal, especially dinner.


The only cosmetic you really need

October 21, 2012

Apply liberally:

Guaranteed to make you look and feel wonderful!
Hat tip: Laughter Yoga.

Rural round-up

October 21, 2012
Landcorp pursues dairy growth:
 
Landcorp Farming expects substantial further growth in last year’s record dairy production, through the joint venture with Shanghai Pengxin of China and enlargement of established dairy complexes including Wairakei Estate in the central North Island.

Subject to the outcome of legal proceedings in the Supreme Court, Landcorp and Shanghai Pengxin intend forming a joint venture company, Milk New Zealand Farm Management Ltd, to operate the farms and explore other opportunities for growth in dairy production in this country. . .

BNZ Appointment Reflects Growing Importance of Irrigation Projects:
 

Guy Ensor is on a mission to support some of the most critical infrastructure developments New Zealand will see this decade. He has been appointed BNZ’s first national manager, water and irrigation. The position has been established in recognition of the growing significance of the national freshwater resource.“Our long-standing relationship with the agricultural sector has made us acutely aware that the sustainable management of New Zealand’s freshwater resource is absolutely critical to New Zealand’s future,” says head of agribusiness, Richard Bowman.

“All New Zealanders have a common interest in ensuring the country’s freshwater lakes, rivers, aquifers and wetlands are managed wisely. Guy’s specific combination of experience will ensure BNZ contributes to that,” he says. . .

 
Research unit going 50 years: Annette Scott:
The Lincoln University-based Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit (AERU) was established in 1962. Its key objective was to better integrate research in respect to the place of agriculture in New Zealand. The core mission of the AERU is to exercise leadership in research for sustainable well-being with researchers working together to produce and deliver new knowledge.AERU operates as a semi-autonomous research centre at Lincoln University providing research expertise to a wide range of organisations in the public and private sectors.

Research is focused on economic, resource, environmental and social issues with the unit also co-ordinating some of the external research undertaken by academic staff from other Lincoln University faculties. . .

 
A country a day for Peterson:
 
BLNZ CHAIRMAN Mike Petersen is in Europe this week on a whistle-stop visit to farming leaders in seven countries in just eight days.

It’s an annual event, meeting officials from the European Commission in Brussels, and farming leaders in Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, France and Germany.

“Europe is such an important market for sheepmeat and increasingly for beef. I will meet EU officials to talk about our expectations of the sheepmeat quota. It’s no secret we’ll be well under with quota – about the 80% mark – well below where were three years ago when we were 98%,” he says.

 
Woman survives ramming by 650kg steer: Caroline King:
 
A woman repeatedly rammed by a 650-kilogram steer walked away from the attack with no broken bones after the heroic actions of her boss.Tania Kiely was tagging steers at a farm at Decanter Bay, Banks Peninsula, about 12.30pm on Monday when the steer attacked.

Kiely, 40, was only a couple of metres away from the animal when it charged.

“I was pushing them up into the race at the time.

“I remember it looking at me,” she said.

“It put its head down and ran at me. . .

 

The social impacts on snow on farmers – Terri Russell:

Making new friends is one way Southland farmers can cope with the stress of snowstorms, new research says.

Farmers were hit hard during the September 2010 snowstorm when about one million lambs died in the south and milk production was disrupted.

A research team from the University of Canterbury and Lincoln University have looked at ways that Southland farmers can better prepare for a similar event.

Lead researcher Zachary Whitman said findings so far showed a significant social impact on farmers. . .


Heels height of misogyny

October 21, 2012

Being blessed, or cursed, with a thousand acre stride I’ve never been at home in high heels.

My rule of foot is that if I can’t stand, walk and, if need be, run in a pair of shoes, I won’t wear them.

The highest heels I possess aren’t very high at all because I put comfort well ahead of fashion.

That’s easy for me when I’m not in a position where I’m judged by my appearance. It’s much harder for women in the public eye.

Wearing heels can be uncomfortable and make you vulnerable to tripping or sinking into wet grass; not wearing heels invites the fashion police to denounce you as frumpy.

So, few women leaders will go flat-footed; most of them – like most other women – want to be stylish. But the choices for women today are not just between heels and flats; the height of the heel is the issue, and they have never been higher.

In an era when women are supposedly economically liberated and politically empowered, it seems fashion is doing its best to subvert this. A recent report found that Australian women were the most economically empowered of 128 countries surveyed. Yet, the woman executive or company director wanting a pair of ultra-glamorous Christian Louboutin shoes with their trademark red soles would find herself obliged to totter around on 16-centimetre heels.

“It’s like foot binding – except women are doing it to themselves,” says Kirstie Clements, former editor in chief of Australian Vogue.

She says Louboutin’s original shoe, the classic Pigalle pump, “made you walk sexily, looked beautiful and were comfortable”. They had 8.5-centimetre heels. Today Louboutin’s lowest is 10 centimetres.

These shoes are uncomfortable – “they cripple you before you even leave the house,” Clements says. . .

. . .Today women executives want to be feminine but what is on offer from the men who make shoes – and they are all men: Jimmy Choo, Manolo Blahnik, Louboutin et al – is neither flattering nor womanly. “It has turned into misogyny,” says Clements. You could almost posit that there is a reverse correlation between the height of women’s heels and their success in the wider world. It’s hard to think and perform when you are in constant pain. . .

So why do they do it?

Legs look better like that, even if you’re a cow:

Hat Tip: The Lady Garden.


70 years on

October 21, 2012

He was 29 when he took part in the battle of  El  Alamein as a soldier in the 20th Battalion of the 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

He never spoke about it much.

He returned to Egypt with the New Zealand contingent to the 50th anniversary commemoration.

He never spoke about that much either and now it’s too late  to ask him because he died 13 years ago.

But if Dad was here I am sure he’d appreciate the words of Defence Minister Jonathan Coleman at the 70th anniversary commemoration:

. . . To the New Zealand veterans who are with us today I know this is a very poignant return to El Alamein. You have all lived a whole lifetime in the seven decades since your service here in the flower of your youth. I know that the experiences of the North African campaign will have shaped those years in ways that only your fellow comrades could truly appreciate.

Subsequent generations of New Zealanders are forever indebted, to you and those who rest here in North Africa. We look at you in awe, because you left ordinary everyday life in the streets, in the workplaces and on the farms of New Zealand, and farewelled your loved ones to serve. You made sacrifices which have meant that we who have followed have been able to live in prosperity and peace. You and your mates were ordinary Kiwis who became the greatest of Kiwis. Your country is very, very proud of you.

We will always remember and honour those New Zealanders who fought and died here, and we will continue to defend the values they upheld with such valour.

Dad would also note with the irony of the anniversary commemorations coinciding with the desecration of Jewish graves in Auckland.

This is the sort of ignorance and intolerance against which the men at El Alamein fought.

It shows that 70 years on some idiots neither share nor appreciate the values the soldiers upheld.


October 21 in history

October 21, 2012

1096 People’s Crusade: The Turkish army annihilated the People’s Army of the West.

1520  Ferdinand Magellan discoversed the strait which was named after him.

1600 Tokugawa Ieyasu defeatedthe leaders of rival Japanese clans in the Battle of Sekigahara, which marked the beginning of the Tokugawa shogunate that ruled Japan until the mid-nineteenth century.

1772 Samuel Taylor Coleridge, British poet, was born (d. 1834).

1797  In Boston Harbor, the 44-gun United States Navy frigate USS Constitution was launched.

1805 Battle of Trafalgar: A British fleet led by Vice Admiral Lord Nelson defeatd a combined French and Spanish fleet off the coast of Spain under Admiral Villeneuve.

1805 Austrian General Mack surrendered his army to the Grand Army of Napoleon at the Battle of Ulm.

1816 The Penang Free School was founded in George Town, Penang, by the Rev Hutchings. It is the oldest English-language school in Southeast Asia.

1824  Joseph Aspdin patented Portland cement.

1833  Alfred Nobel, Swedish inventor and founder of the Nobel Prize, was born(d. 1896).

1854 Florence Nightingale and a staff of 38 nurses were sent to the Crimean War.

1861 American Civil War: Battle of Ball’s Bluff – Union forces under Colonel Edward Baker were defeated by Confederate troops.

1867  Manifest Destiny: Medicine Lodge Treaty – Near Medicine Lodge, Kansas a landmark treaty was signed by southern Great Plains Indian leaders. The treaty required Native American Plains tribes to relocate a reservation in western Oklahoma.

1879 Using a filament of carbonized thread, Thomas Edison tested the first practical electric incandescent light bulb.

1892 Opening ceremonies for the World’s Columbian Exposition were held in Chicago, though because construction was behind schedule, the exposition did not open until May 1, 1893.

1895 The Republic of Formosa collapsed as Japanese forces invaded.

1902 In the United States, a five month strike by United Mine Workers ended.

1917  Dizzy Gillespie, American musician, was born (d. 1993).

1921 Sir Malcolm Arnold, British composer, was born (d. 2006).

1921 President Warren G. Harding delivered the first speech by a sitting President against lynching in the deep south.

1921 George Melford’s silent film, The Sheik, starring Rudolph Valentino, premiered.

1929 Ursula K. Le Guin, American author was born.

1931 Vivian Pickles, English actress, was born.

1940  Geoff Boycott, English cricketer, was born.

1940  Manfred Mann, English musician, was born.

1942 Judy Sheindlin, American judge (“Judge Judy”), was born.

1944 The first kamikaze attack: A Japanese plane carrying a 200 kilograms (440 lb) bomb attacked HMAS Australia off Leyte Island, as the Battle of Leyte Gulf began.

1945 Women’s suffrage: Women were allowed to vote in France for the first time.

1945 Juan Perón married Evita.

1952 Trevor Chappell, Australian cricketer, was born.

1953  Peter Mandelson, British politician, was born.

1956 Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer, was born.

1959 The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opened to the public.

1964 Peter Snell won a second gold at the Toky Olympics.

Peter Snell wins second gold in Tokyo

1965  Comet Ikeya-Seki approached perihelion, passing 450,000 kilometers from the sun.

1966  Aberfan disaster: A slag heap collapsed on the village of Aberfan, killing 144 people, mostly schoolchildren.

1967 Vietnam War: More than 100,000 war protesters gathered in Washington, D.C..  Similar demonstrations occurred simultaneously in Japan and Western Europe.

1969 A coup d’état in Somalia brought Siad Barre to power.

1973 John Paul Getty III‘s ear was cut off by his kidnappers and sent to a newspaper in Rome.

1978 Australian pilot Frederick Valentich vanished in a Cessna 182 over the Bass Strait, after reporting contact with an unidentified aircraft.

1979  Moshe Dayan resigned from the Israeli government because of strong disagreements with Prime Minister Menachem Begin over policy towards the Arabs.

1983  The metre was defined at the seventeenth General Conference on Weights and Measures as the distance light travels in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second.

1986  In Lebanon, pro-Iranian kidnappers claimed to have abducted American writer Edward Tracy.

1987 Jaffna hospital massacre by Indian Peace Keeping Force in Sri Lanka killing 70.

1994 North Korea and the United States signed an agreement that requires North Korea to stop its nuclear weapons program and agree to inspections.

1994  In Seoul, 32 people were killed when the Seongsu Bridge collapsed.

2003  Images of the dwarf planet Eris were taken and subsequently used in its discovery by the team of Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David L. Rabinowitz.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipeda


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