From protester to MP and back

September 18, 2012

It hasn’t taken former MP Sue Bradford long to get back to her former vocation as a protester:

Anti-poverty campaigners protesting the Government’s welfare  reforms have chained themselves to the Ministry of Social Development (MSD)  Auckland regional office.

About 20 people took part in today’s protest at the office  in suburban Ellerslie, entering the building and chaining themselves to  equipment.

Inspector Lou Alofa of the police northern communications  centre said up to six people had been arrested.

“We have several people who have chained themselves to one  of the pillars there and police are working towards a resolution,” he said.

It was reported left-wing protester and former Green MP Sue Bradford was among  those at the protest.

They are protesting against reforms designed to get people off benefits and into work which is a big step towards relieving poverty.

How genuine is their concern about poverty when they are showing they’d prefer people stay dependent and poor?


Word of the day

September 18, 2012

Corrigible – capable of being corrected, improved, rectified, reformed or set right.


Rural round-up

September 18, 2012

“Correction”predicted for 2012/13 sheep and beef farm profits

Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s (B+LNZ) New Season Outlook is expecting a correction that is likely to see average sheep and beef farm profit settle at around $96,500 for the 2012/13 season.

B+LNZ Economic Service Executive Director Rob Davison says profit before tax rose 30 per cent in 2011/12, which means this season’s predicted 34 per cent drop could be interpreted as a correction, from what was a near record farm profit in the 2011/12 year.

“While disappointing, it’s not entirely unexpected given the global recession,” says Davison. . .

Farmer’s Split-Lambing Trial Recognised in Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Wairarapa farmers Tim and Belinda White are trying to breed a ewe that will lamb three times in two years.

For the past five years they have been running a trial on their 440ha farm at Matahiwi, about 10km west of Masterton, with the aim of identifying ewes that are capable of lambing every eight months.

‘Upperwood Farm’, which also grazes dairy heifers and finishes weaner bulls, runs about 2000 Poll Dorset- Dorper ewes – about half of which are mated soon after their spring-born lambs are weaned.

Tim White says the goal is to lamb these ewes again in May/June and then mate them in July while their lambs are still at foot. . .

New Zealand Infant Formula Exporters Association:

The New Zealand Infant Formula Exporters Association, to be branded as “Infant Formula New Zealand”, was formed last week.

The purposes of the Association are to represent and protect the interests of New Zealand Infant Formula Exporters.  To do this, the Association intends to develop an accreditation process for approved export brands.  It has a preference to be self-regulated, and is looking for a close partnership with Government. . .

Anchor Zero Lacto™ brings relief to tummy troubles:

Lactose intolerant Kiwis can now enjoy the full flavour of a morning coffee, the delicious taste of a smoothie, or the simple pleasure of a bowl of cereal thanks to Anchor Zero Lacto™, the only lactose-free fresh milk available in New Zealand.

Zero Lacto™ has all the goodness and taste of fresh cow’s milk, with none of the lactose, offering a tummy friendly and tasty option for people suffering from lactose intolerance.

Leading nutritionist Nikki Hart says many people try and deal with the problem of lactose intolerance by avoiding dairy and the milk chiller aisle altogether. . .

Naked telephony – Bruce Wills:

I was left naked this week.

No I have not suddenly joined some farmers’ naturist club but I am talking about my mobile phone.

In my rush to get to Wellington I was half way to the airport when I had a dread thought, felt my suit jacket then realised, I had left it on my desk at home. There was no time to turn around so for the past few days I have returned to an era before mobile telephony. . .

It is only when you go off the grid that you realise just how dependent we have all become on that little marvel of technology. . .

Landowners call for rambler cull – Newsbiscuit:

Britain’s farmers are facing an ‘unending tide’ of  ramblers, hell-bent on cluttering up the countryside. That’s why many land-owners are calling on the government to sanction a cull, or at  least introduce some natural predators.

Fields across Britain are now dotted with Gore-Tex and farmers have to remain vigilant, ready to ignore the next chirpy ‘hello’. ‘You never  know when a rambler is going to creep up behind you, and ask the name of all your bloody cows,’ complained Derek Winterbottom, from his farm near Ludlow. ‘The sods are always gazing at some tree or other and saying ‘it must be lovely living round here’. Well it was, until you  buggers showed up.’ . . .


Inflation is theft

September 18, 2012

Are the people who think inflation doesn’t matter too young to remember what it was like in the 80s or have they forgotten that inflation is theft?


Enjoying the job

September 18, 2012

It might be my imagination, but I think Anne Tolley is enjoying her job as Police Minister far more than her former role as Education Minister.

With Senior Constable Jason Lexmond & Chuck from Gisborne.

But then the audience at a police dog graduation was almost certainly far more polite than the ones she got from the teachers’ union.


NZ tops OECD for public education spending

September 18, 2012

Next time someone tells you New Zealand doesn’t spend enough on education show them this:

The amount spent isn’t necessarily a measure of success.

The quality of spending is at least as important as the quantity and it’s not just what is spent, but  how and where it’s spent.

There is debate about the quality, how and where of spending. It is possible to find arguments in favour of increasing the amount that’s spent too.

But they lose some of their strength when we top the OECD for spending on public education as a percentage of public expenditure.


Paperwork provides backstop

September 18, 2012

A successful partnership between two brothers and the brother-in-law of one of them worked well on trust.

But they still had an agreement in the bottom draw and when one of the men decided to pull out of the partnership the paperwork ensured it happened fairly and tidily.

The importance of paperwork to back up trust is illustrated in this partnership:

 A Western Australian couple has lost a High Court case over the dissolution of a farm partnership in Canterbury where late businessman Allan Hubbard’s idiosyncratic record keeping made it difficult to prove what the partners had actually agreed to. . .

Farmers round here still do deals on handshakes but the sensible ones back them up with careful paperwork as a backstop because you need more than trust if you want your case to stand up in court.

 


September 18 in history

September 18, 2012

96  Nerva was proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian was assassinated.

324 Constantine the Great decisively defeated Licinius in the Battle of Chrysopolis, establishing Constantine’s sole control over the Roman Empire.

1180  Philip Augustus became king of France.

1454  In the Battle of Chojnice, the Polish army was defeated by the Teutonic army during the Thirteen Years’ War.

1709 Samuel Johnson, English writer and lexicographer, was born (d. 1784).

1739  The Treaty of Belgrade was signed, ceding Belgrade to the Ottoman Empire.

1793  The first cornerstone of the Capitol building was laid by George Washington.

1809 The Royal Opera House in London opened.

1810  First Government Junta in Chile.

1812  The 1812 Fire of Moscow died down after destroying more than three quarters of the city. Napoleon returned from the Petrovsky Palace to the Moscow Kremlin, which was spared from the fire.

1837  Tiffany and Co. (first named Tiffany & Young) was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and Teddy Young in New York City.

1838 The Anti-Corn Law League was established by Richard Cobden.

1850  The U.S. Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850.

1851  First publication of The New-York Daily Times, which later became The New York Times.

1863  American Civil War: Battle of Chickamauga.

1870  Old Faithful Geyser was observed and named by Henry D. Washburn during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition to Yellowstone.

1872 King Oscar II acceded to the throne of Sweden-Norway.

1873  The Panic of 1873 began.

1876 James Scullin, 9th Prime Minister of Australia, was born (d. 1953).

1879 The Blackpool Illuminations were switched on for the first time.

1882 The Pacific Stock Exchange opened.

1885  Riots broke out in Montreal to protest against compulsory smallpox vaccination.

1889  Doris Blackburn, Australian politician, was born (d. 1970).

1895  Booker T. Washington delivered the “Atlanta Compromise” address.

1895  Daniel David Palmer gave the first chiropractic adjustment.

1895 John Diefenbaker, 13th Prime Minister of Canada, was born (d. 1979).

1898  Fashoda Incident – Lord Kitchener’s ships reached Fashoda, Sudan.

1900 Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, 1st Prime Minister of Mauritius, was born (d. 1985).

1905  Agnes de Mille, American choreographer, was born (d. 1993).

1905  Greta Garbo, Swedish actress, was born(d. 1990) .

1906 A typhoon with tsunami killed an estimated 10,000 people in Hong Kong.

1910  In Amsterdam, 25,000 demonstrated for general suffrage.

1911  Russian Premier Peter Stolypin was shot at the Kiev Opera House.

1914 The Irish Home Rule Act became law, but was delayed until after World War I.

1919 The Netherlands gave women the right to vote.

1919 – Fritz Pollard became the first African-American to play professional football for a major team, the Akron Pros.

1923 Queen Anne of Romania was born.

1928  Juan de la Cierva made the first autogyro crossing of the English Channel.

1931 The Mukden Incident gave Japan the pretext to invade and occupy Manchuria.

1937 David and Mary McGregor moved in to New Zealand’s first state house.

First state house opened in Miramar

1939 Jorge Sampaio, President of Portugal, was born.

1939 World War II: Polish government of Ignacy Mościcki fled to Romania.

1939   William Joyce made his first Nazi propaganda broadcast.

1940  World War II: Italian troops conquered Sidi Barrani.

1942  The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was authorized.

1943  World War II: The Jews of Minsk were massacred at Sobibór.

1943 – World ar II: Adolf Hitler ordered the deportation of Danish Jews.

1944  World War II: The British submarine HMS Tradewind torpedoed Junyō Maru, 5,600 killed.

1948  Communist Madiun uprising in Dutch Indies.

1948 –Margaret Chase Smith of Maine became the first woman elected to the US Senate without completing another senator’s term, when she defeated Democratic opponent Adrian Scolten.

1948 – The Donald Bradman-led Australian cricket team completed the unprecedented feat of going through an English summer without defeat.

1952 Dee Dee Ramone, American bassist (The Ramones), was born (d. 2002).

1959 Vanguard 3 was launched into Earth orbit.

1961  U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld died in a plane crash while attempting to negotiate peace in the war-torn Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

1964  Constantine II of Greece married Danish princess Anne-Marie.

1971 Lance Armstrong, American cyclist, was born.

1972  First Ugandans expelled by Idi Amin arrived in the United Kingdom.

1974 Hurricane Fifi struck Honduras with 110 mph winds, killing 5,000 people.

1975 Patty Hearst was arrested after a year on the FBI Most Wanted List.

1976 Mao Zedong‘s funeral in Beijing.

1980 Soyuz 38 carried 2 cosmonauts (including 1 Cuban) to Salyut 6 space station.

1981 Assemblée Nationale voted to abolish capital punishment in France.

1982  Christian militia began killing six-hundred Palestinians in Lebanon.

1984  Joe Kittinger completed the first solo balloon crossing of the Atlantic.

1988 End of pro-democracy uprisings in Myanmar after a bloody military coup by the State Law and Order Restoration Council.

1991 Yugoslavia began a naval blockade of 7 Adriatic port cities.

1992  An explosion rocks Giant Mine at the height of a labour dispute, killing 9 replacement workers.

1997  United States media magnate Ted Turner donated $US1 billion to the United Nations.

1997 – Voters in Wales voted yes (50.3%) on a referendum on Welsh autonomy.

1998  ICANN was formed.

2001  First mailing of anthrax letters from Trenton, New Jersey in the 2001 anthrax attacks.

2006 Right wing protesters riot the building of the Hungarian Television in Budapest.

2007 Pervez Musharraf announced he would step down as army chief and restore civilian rule to Pakistan, but only after he was re-elected president.

2007 Buddhist monks joined anti-government protesters in Myanmar, starting the Saffron Revolution.

2009 The 72 year run of the soap opera The Guiding Light ended as its final episode is broadcast.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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