Word of the day

August 19, 2012

Embonpoint – the condition of  being plump; stoutness; the plump or fleshy part of the body, in particular a woman’s bosom; a pleasing fullness of figure.


Rural round-up

August 19, 2012

First product off the line at Fonterra Darfield:

The first bags of whole milk powder have rolled off the production line at Fonterra’s new $200 million manufacturing site near Darfield in Canterbury and are bound for South East Asia, China and the Middle East.

Brent Taylor, our Director of Operations – NZ Milk, says it was smooth running for the new plant, which produced 40 metric tonnes of product in its first full day of operations.

“It has taken less than two years to bring the project together and it is a significant achievement for us and good news for Canterbury and the wider Christchurch rebuild, he says. . .

Tree Harvesting Invention Named New Zealand Winner of the James Dyson Award :

A tree harvesting device has won the New Zealand leg of the twelfth annual James Dyson Award, a product design competition.

Current harvesting methods require return visits to a forest, causing soil erosion and damage to surrounding trees. Nick Ross, an industrial design graduate from Massey University, has devised a solution that cuts trees right from ground level, and feeds them straight into the machine. An extraction process is then engaged to return needles back to the soil for nutrients, while the branches gathered in a separate container can be re-used as an alternative energy fuel. . .

Meanwhile in the asylum – Offsetting Behaviour:

I like to think of New Zealand as being the Outside of the Asylum.

Outside of the Asylum, farmers are free to sell their produce.

Today’s news from inside the asylum: hosting a 10 year old’s birthday party and selling a bit of farm produce at the event
hosted on your farm gets you thousands of dollars in fines
. . .

Gibbston Valley Winery celebrates two special ‘birthdays’

A Central Otago winery celebrating its 25th commercial grape harvest with a black tie dinner next month will also mark a milestone of a different kind.

The Gibbston Valley Winery anniversary dinner event on September 1 will kick start the award-winning winery’s support of national charity Cure Kids, with all proceeds from the night’s auctions going to the charity.

In keeping with that support, the dinner will also celebrate the remarkable story of Cure Kids ambassador and Queenstown resident Sophie Newbold, who celebrates her 18th birthday on September 14. . .

Boot camp to inspire development of New Zealand Inc – Allan Barber:

This week a high powered Boot Camp, attended by a group of key New Zealand agribusiness executives, will take place at Stanford University, California, with facilitation by Professor of Marketing Baba Shiv whose research expertise is in neuroeconomics.

The Boot Camp is the brainchild of Keith Cooper from Silver Fern Farms and John Brakenridge, Chief Executive of NZ Merino, who visited Stanford to discover new ideas on how to market Silere lamb from the two companies’ JV established last year with assistance from the Primary Growth Partnership fund. . .


“Ideal” thinner than healthy

August 19, 2012

It’s decades since Wallis Simpson said you could never be too rich nor too thin.

But if health’s your goal she was wrong, at least about the thin bit.

Analysis of the weight of actresses and average women showed the “ideal” is thinner than healthy:

Chart

I’ve been trying to think of a friend who hasn’t at some time thought she was too fat. Sadly and I can’t even though at the time many would have been well within the healthy weight range.

How much has the difference between the unrealistic “ideal” and healthy got to do with the unhealthy fixation on weight by so many women?

Could it also have something to do with the growing number who are heavier than is healthy?


9/10

August 19, 2012

9/10 in the Herald’s political quiz.


Lamb burgers at last – UPDATED

August 19, 2012

It’s taken around three decades but former Trade Minister Mike Moore’s dream of lamb burgers has been realised:

After two years of product development McDonald’s has added New Zealand lamb to its menu, an initiative which has been endorsed by Beef + Lamb NZ.

“After seeing the success of McDonald’s premium Angus beef range, with 2 million kilograms sold since launch, we are thrilled with this new partnership and the potential these products have to get Kiwis eating more New Zealand lamb,” says Beef + Lamb New Zealand CEO Rod Slater.

Federated Farmers is also excited by the development:

What McDonald’s is doing here is massive,” says Jeanette Maxwell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson.

“This is about adding value to the lamb we produce because for the first time ever, lamb is to become a permanent menu item in a major family restaurant chain. While others have run ‘limited time’ offers, McDonald’s New Zealand believes it is onto a winner and we agree.

“As a sheep and beef farmer, I know the positive impact McDonald’s involvement with AngusPure has had. Since August 2009, McDonald’s has not only purchased some two million kilograms of AngusPure, it has greatly raised the profile of it as a premier product.

 “This is where things get truly exciting. If lamb works here it may find itself onto menus in other countries; the Middle East and Asia especially.

“New Zealand is already a major supplier of beef as part of McDonald’s global supply chain and it is not a dream to believe lamb could well follow. The prospects are mouth watering.

“The Serious Lamb Burger is a big meal in its own right but to me, it is no different from what’s available at up-market takeaways. This burger is being pitched as an upmarket offering and that is a great position for lamb to be in.

“For the health conscious, the lamb wrap ticks all the boxes and shows the flexibility of lamb as a fulsome meal or as a healthy snack.

“Frankly, we are excited because we can see only upsides from the farmer’s perspective.

“Importantly, to deliver the lamb McDonald’s needs, we are seeing close cooperation from the farm gate, Beef+Lamb as well as multiple processors. This is unity around a value added product and it is as heartening, as it is creative,” Mrs Maxwell concluded.

Mike Moore’s lamb burgers became a bit of a joke, but time has proved him right.

His dream was of lamb burgers in the USA and other overseas markets. The McDonald’s initiative is for a limited time in Australia but aims to be permanent here.

It’s a good start and if it proves popular here could lead to lamb burgers in export markets.

UPDATE:

Fed Farmers’  president Bruce Wills is enthusiastic about this too:

There is a hashtag of Twitter, which pretty much says it all  – #mikemoorevisionary.

Almost 30 years ago, this former Trade Minister, Prime Minister, Secretary-General of the WTO and now, our man in Washington, suggested lamb burgers would save the meat industry.

At the time, he suggested just a slither of the US hamburger market converted to lamb instead, would do the trick.

He was not half wrong because American’s consume some 150 million tonnes of hamburgers each year. Based on current lamb production here, even a quarter of one percent of that vast market, would see us fall some 100,000 tonnes short.

It is no exaggeration to say McDonald’s latest innovation is a big one for New Zealand’s sheep farmers. . .


Pristine water, no people

August 19, 2012

The Otago Regional Council is proposing changes to its water quality plan which would mean some land in North Otago couldn’t be farmed.

One of those affected by the planned change is Robert Borst who farms 580 hectares in the Kakanui Valley.

. . . Mr Borst believed there was a lack of understanding of the implications for farming businesses as a result of what the council was trying to impose, and it was “hellbent on bulldozing along”.

“The harsh reality is, unless I get this overturned, all these people [his staff] and the whole farming business is finished. That’s what we’re fighting.” . . .

. . . “Here we’re talking about probably hundreds of jobs and family farming businesses put in jeopardy.”

The way it was heading, there would be pristine water in the Kakanui Valley but no-one living there, he said.

We drink this water and swim in it.

We want it to be clean and to stay clean.

But the proposed changes appear to be an extreme reaction which would prevent farming in the area.

 

 

 


August 19 in history

August 19, 2012

1504 Battle of Knockdoe.

1561 An 18-year-old Mary, Queen of Scots, returned to Scotland after spending 13 years in France.

1612  The “Samlesbury witches“, three women from  Samlesbury, were put on trial, accused for practising witchcraft, one of the most famous witch trials in English history.

1631  John Dryden, English poet, was born  (d. 1700).

1666  Second Anglo-Dutch War: Rear Admiral Robert Holmes led a raid on the Dutch island of Terschelling, destroying 150 merchant ships, an act later known as “Holmes’s Bonfire“.

1689 Samuel Richardson, English writer, was born  (d. 1761).
1692 Salem witch trials:  one woman and four men, including a clergyman, were executed after being convicted of witchcraft.

1745  Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard in Glenfinnan – the start of the Second Jacobite Rebellion, known as “the 45″.

1768 Saint Isaac’s Cathedral was founded in Saint Petersburg.

1772  Gustavus III of Sweden staged a Coup d’état, in which he assumed power and enacted a new constitution that divided power between the Riksdag and the King.

1782 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Blue Licks – the last major engagement of the war, almost ten months after the surrender of the British commander Lord Cornwallis.

1812 War of 1812: American frigate USS Constitution defeated the British frigate HMS Guerriere off the coast of Nova Scotia, earning her nickname “Old Ironsides”.

1813  Gervasio Antonio de Posadas joined Argentina’s second triumvirate.

1839  Presentation of Jacque Daguerre’s new photographic process to the French Academy of Sciences.

1853 Edward Gibbon Wakefield was elected to the New Zealand Parliament.

Wakefield elected to Parliament

1861 First ascent of Weisshorn, fifth highest summit in the Alps.

1883 Coco Chanel, French clothing designer, was born  (d. 1971).

1895 American frontier murderer and outlaw, John Wesley Hardin, was killed by an off-duty policeman in a saloon in El Paso.

1902 Ogden Nash, American poet, was born  (d. 1971).

1919 Afghanistan gained full independence from the United Kingdom.

1927  Metropolitan Sergius proclaimed the declaration of loyalty of the Russian Orthodox Church to the Soviet state.

1928 Bernard Levin, English journalist, author, and broadcaster, was born  (d. 2004).

1930 Frank McCourt, Irish-American author, was born  (d. 2009).

1934  The first All-American Soap Box Derby was held in Dayton, Ohio.

1934  The creation of the position Führer was approved by the German electorate with 89.9% of the popular vote.

1939 Ginger Baker, English musician (Cream), was born.

1940 Johnny Nash, American singer-songwriter, was born.

1940 First flight of the B-25 Mitchell medium bomber.

1942  Operation Jubilee – the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division led an amphibious assault by allied forces on Dieppe, France and failed.

1944  As his damaged Hawker Typhoon fighter-bomber rapidly lost height, Pilot Officer James Stellin struggled to avoid crashing into Saint-Maclou-la-Brière, a village of 370 people in the Seine-Maritime region. He succeeded, but at the cost of his own life.

Kiwi pilot's sacrifice saves French village

1944  Liberation of Paris – Paris rose against German occupation with the help of Allied troops.

1945   Viet Minh led by Ho Chi Minh took power in Hanoi.

1946 Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States, was born.

1951 John Deacon, English musician (Queen), was born.

1953  Cold War: the CIA helped to overthrow the government of Mohammed Mossadegh in Iran and reinstated the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

1955 In the Northeast United States, severe flooding caused by Hurricane Diane, claimed 200 lives.

1960  Cold War: in Moscow, downed American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers was sentenced to ten years imprisonment by the Soviet Union for espionage.

1960  Sputnik 5 – the Soviet Union launched the satellite with the dogs Belka and Strelka, 40 mice, 2 rats and a variety of plants.

1980  Saudia Flight 163, a Lockheed L-1011 TriStar burned after making an emergency landing at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh killing 301 people.

1981  Gulf of Sidra Incident: United States fighters intercepted and shot down two Libyan Sukhoi Su-22 fighter jets over the Gulf of Sidra.

1987  Hungerford Massacre: Michael Ryan killed sixteen people with an assault rifle and then committed suicide.

1989  Polish president Wojciech Jaruzelski nominated Solidarity activist Tadeusz Mazowiecki to be the first non-communist Prime Minister in 42 years.

1989  Raid on offshore pirate station, Radio Caroline in North Sea by British and Dutch governments.

1989 Several hundred East Germans crossed the frontier between Hungary and Austria during the Pan-European Picnic, part of the events which began the process of the Fall of the Berlin Wall.

1990  Leonard Bernstein conducted his final concert, ending with Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

1991  Collapse of the Soviet Union, August Coup: Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev was placed under house arrest..

1991  Hurricane Bob hit the Northeast, United States.

1999  Tens of thousands of Serbians rallied to demand the resignation of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia President Slobodan Milošević.

2002 A Russian Mi-26 helicopter carrying troops was hit by a Chechen missile killing 118 soldiers.

2003 A car-bomb attack on United Nations headquarters in Iraq killed the agency’s top envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello and 21 other employees.

2003  A Hamas planned suicide attack on a bus in Jerusalem killed 23 Israelis, 7 of them children in the Jerusalem bus 2 massacre.

2005 The first-ever joint military exercise between Russia and China, called Peace Mission 2005 began.

2005 A series of strong storms lashed Southern Ontario spawning several tornadoes as well as creating extreme flash flooding in Toronto and its surrounding communities. .

2009  A series of bombings in Baghdad, killed 101 and injured 565 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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