It’s up to business

Anyone who has taken a modicum of interest in politics in the last four years should be in no doubt about the government’s economic plans.

They might not like it but they should understand it.

But a majority of respondents to the Herald’s mood of the boardroom survey say the government has failed to articulate its plan.

Just how much does a political party have to do to get its message across?

Almost every speech from Prime Minister John Key, Finance Minister Bill English, and any other minister who mentions the economy spell out the plan quite clearly.

Perhaps those who haven’t got the message should follow this advice:

Can’t understand why the Business leaders aren’t aware of the present National Governments long term PLANS. I have certainly had no trouble finding and understanding where National wishes to position NZ, such that the sons and daughters of not only Business Leaders, but all NZ’ers will have a future in NZ.This is a vastly different future to that which Parker is planning for when he rolls Shearer next year, a possibility, regardless of the recent labour conference change of rules.
The information is out there, if one looks; BUT you are unlikely to find it headlined in the written, or voice media. They are too Socialist.
Perhaps the Business Leaders should step out of the Cocktail circuit, and visit their local National Party office for a briefing; or if they wish have both, hold the Chardonnay glass in the left hand, and lookup the National website using the Right hand.

However, in spite of what respondents to the Herald survey said, a BusinessNZ survey show its members do understand, and support, what the government is doing:

BusinessNZ chief executive Phil O’Reilly said the “standard response” that might otherwise be expected from business was that the Government should cut spending. But the results from his organisation’s survey were consistent with what members were telling him.

“They are supportive of this kind of track the Government’s taking. You don’t want to get so much austerity that you push the economy into recession – at the same time you don’t want them to just blast money everywhere in the hope of getting the economy moving faster because a lot of it will be low-quality spend.” . . .

O’Reilly said the SME Snapshot results largely reflected what business people told him every day. That included the widely held view among members that they generally supported the direction of the Government’s “relatively conservative economic reform programme”.

Building business competitiveness, reducing Government spending as a proportion of GDP, improving New Zealand’s international situation, and building innovation and skills were all regarded as important.

“There will be some in the business community that will have concerns about the pace and execution of government policy, but they broadly support it.

Regardless of what businesses know and understand about government’s plans, the good ones treat governments like the weather, enjoy it when it’s good and do all they can in spite of it when it’s not.

The businesses that get on with their businesses, concentrating on what they can control, are the ones with the best chance of success which will be good not just for them but for the wider economy.

This point is made by Liam Dann:

. . . In reality business knows that there is little point in looking to Government for any major new spending in the next few years.

So what next? Where does all this leave business in 2012? Where will the circuit breakers for this economic cycle come from?

We are going to need strong and innovative leadership from the business community to turn the tide. And we are going to have to see some of that dogged optimism translate into business spending.

Teasing the public out of its recessionary mindset will be a slow process but it is a chicken and egg scenario. Business can lead the way by being proactive and trying new things. It is never easy because there are many reasons why we can’t afford to do something. But if the alternative is slowing sinking in the mire of a stagnant economy – can we afford not to?

Governments come and governments go, so do recessions.

The global financial crisis one isn’t going anywhere fast and it will have an impact here.

But where there is crisis there is also opportunity and businesses which realise it’s up to them and do what they can about it will help turn the tide.

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