Low inflation, low interest rates

The CPI rose only .3% in the June quarter and the annual increase was only 1%.

That is very good news for households:

Hon BILL ENGLISH (Minister of Finance): Statistics New Zealand today reported that inflation rose 0.3 percent in the June quarter, annual inflation fell to 1 percent, its lowest level since 1999, and the CPI is increasing at its slowest rate in more than 12 years. At the same time floating mortgage rates, at around 5.75 percent, are at their lowest level in 45 years. This is saving a family with a $200,000 mortgage about $200 a week compared with what they were paying 4 years ago. These factors are helping New Zealand families save more, pay down debt, and get ahead.

. . . Hon Dr Nick Smith: What other factors are helping New Zealanders get ahead?

Hon BILL ENGLISH: Although inflation has been falling, the economy has continued growing moderately. This is reflected in real after-tax wages, which have increased by about 11 percent since September 2008. The components of this are that gross wages have increased 12 percent, after-tax gross wages have increased 20 percent, and inflation has been a bit over 8 percent, which leaves the 11 percent increase. This is a vast improvement on the situation in the 9 years to September 2008, when New Zealand’s real after-tax wages increased by only 4.4 percent in total.

Hon Dr Nick Smith: How does the current level of inflation, at a 13-year low, compare with what the Government inherited when it came into office in 2008?

Hon BILL ENGLISH: When the Government came into office in November 2008, annual inflation was running at 5.1 percent, rather than 1 percent, as it is today. That is because power prices had risen by 72 percent in 8 years, petrol prices were around 10 percent higher than they are now, and floating mortgage rates were at decade highs of almost 11 percent. The lower inflation we are now experiencing, combined with steady increases in after-tax wages, mean most Kiwi families are better off now than they were in 2008, and that is why they are able to reduce their debt and increase their savings.

In the late 1980s we were paying more than 25% for seasonal finance. That sounds like a wonderful incentive for savers but raging inflation took too much of the value from savings.

Low inflation and low interest rates are a much better combination for businesses and for savers.

 

 

 

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