Word of the day

July 7, 2012

Exiguous – very small in size or amount; excessively scanty; inadequate, meager.


9/10

July 7, 2012

9/10 in the Hearld’s political quiz.


Candidate for Darwin Award

July 7, 2012

A Masterton ma n lost sight in one eye  after trying to find out if a nailgun could pierce bone.

Ever wondered if a nail could pierce bone? A Masterton man apparently did, so he placed a nailgun against his forehead and pulled the trigger to find out.

The nail shot into his skull, pinned his beanie to his head and came to rest behind his nose.

“He actually walked himself into the hospital and was laughing about it,” said Vicki Hookham, charge nurse manager at Wairarapa Hospital’s Emergency Department.

“It turned out they were seeing if it would go through the bone,” Ms Hookham said.

“Needless to say, there wasn’t a lot of brain function going on before or after that decision.”

 

Definitely a potential candidate for a Darwin Award.


Guinness world record for gumboots attempt

July 7, 2012

AgFest West Coast aims to recognise the important part agriculture plays on the Coast.

It’s being held in Hokitika on July 13th and 14th.

The organisers are also aiming to make a world record for the most people wearing gumboots to a single event.

If you’re joining in, wear gumboot socks.
I was dressed to go to Dunedin yesterday when I had to go out to the yard, didn’t want to get my good shoes dirty so grabbed my gumboots.
When I got back inside and took the gumboots off I found that the boots had rubbed holes in the heels of a new pair of pantyhose.
P.S. – the spell check  doesn’t speak New Zealand English. It doesn’t recognise gumboots and suggested gumbo, gun boat and gumboil.

Westland Dairy cuts forecast payout

July 7, 2012

Westland Dairy has dropped its forecast payout by 20 cents per kilo to a range of $6.00 to $6.20.

“Fluctuations in payouts are normal and certainly not unique to Westland or this season,” chairman Matt O’Regan said in a statement. “The volatility of the New Zealand dollar remains high and the spot (exchange) rate strengthened recently, which results in fewer New Zealand dollars available for pay-out.”

Fonterra, Westland’s major competitor, lowered its forecast by 30 cents to $6.05 a couple of months ago.

Falling milk prices for producers don’t automatically result in lower costs for consumers.

Lower milk prices and a 37% drop in the price of coffee beans since a high in April last year hasn’t resulted in cheaper coffee.

But the beans and milk are probably the smaller part of the overall cost of a cup of coffee. This was discussed by the panel on RadioNZ yesterday .


Heart true home of guilt

July 7, 2012

Quote of the day:

. . . Whatever the result of any trial, this still holds; the heart is the last, true home of guilt. Jurors may weigh the balance of facts, while lawyers dance in the gaps between them and weave a fog of unsubstantiated possibilities. But, while facts are considered, acts are committed and those who commit them will forever know their character and be captive to their consequence. Jim Hopkins


July 7 in history

July 7, 2012

1456 A retrial verdict acquitted  Joan of Arc of heresy 25 years after her death.

1534 European colonization of the Americas: first known exchange between Europeans and natives of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, in New Brunswick.

1543  French troops invaded Luxembourg.

1575  Raid of the Redeswire, the last major battle between England and Scotland.

1585  Treaty of Nemours abolishesdtolerance to Protestants in France.

1770 The Battle of Larga.

1777 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Hubbardton.

1798 Quasi-War: the U.S. Congress rescinded treaties with France sparking the “war”.

1799  Ranjit Singh‘s men took up their positions outside Lahore.

1807 Napoleonic Wars: Peace of Tilsit between France, Prussia and Russia ended the Fourth Coalition.

1846 Mexican-American War: American troops occupied Monterey and Yerba Buena (now San Francisco), beginning the United States conquest of California.

1851 Charles Tindley, American gospel music composer, was born (d. 1933).

1860 Gustav Mahler, Austrian composer, was born  (d. 1911).

1863  United States began first military draft; exemptions cost $300.

1892 Katipunan: the Revolutionary Philippine Brotherhood was established leading to the fall of the Spanish Empire in Asia.

1898  President William McKinley signed the Newlands Resolution annexing Hawaii as a territory of the United States.

1915 Margaret Abigail Walker Alexander, African-American novelist and poet, was born (d. 1998).

1915 World War I: end of First Battle of the Isonzo.

1916 The NZ Labour Party was founded.

NZ Labour Party founded

1915  An International Railway (New York – Ontario) trolley with an extreme overload of 157 passengers crashed near Queenston, Ontario, killing 15.

1917  Russian Revolution: Prince Georgy Yevgenyevich Lvov formed a Provisional Government in Russia after the deposing of the Tsar Nicholas II.

1919 Jon Pertwee, English actor, was born (d. 1996).

1922  Pierre Cardin, French fashion designer, was born.

1924 Arthur Porritt won a bronze medal for New Zealand in the 100 m at the Olympic Games (portrayed as Tom Watson in the film Chariots of Fire).

'Tom Watson' wins bronze for New Zealand

1924 Mary Ford, American singer, was born (d. 1977).

1927 Doc Severinsen, American composer and musician, was born.

1928  Sliced bread was sold for the first time by the Chillicothe Baking Company of Chillicothe, Missouri. It was described as “the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped”.

1930  Industrialist Henry J. Kaiser began construction of the Boulder Dam (now known as Hoover Dam).

1933 Sir Murray Halberg, New Zealand runner, was born.

1937 Sino-Japanese War: Battle of Lugou Bridge – Japanese forces invaded Beijing.

1940 Ringo Starr, English drummer and singer (The Beatles), was born.

1941  Bill Oddie, English comedian and ornithologist, was born.

1941 World War II: U.S. forces landed in Iceland to forestall an invasion by Germany.

1941  World War II: Beirut was occupied by Free France and British troops.

1942 Carmen Duncan, Australian actress, was born.

1946  Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini became the first American to be canonized.

1946   Howard Hughes nearly died when his XF-11 spy plane prototype crashed.

1947 Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev, King of Nepal, was born.

1947 Alleged and disputed Roswell UFO incident.

1953 Che Guevara set out on a trip through Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador.

1956 Fritz Moravec reached the peak of Gasherbrum II (8,035 m).

1958 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Act into United States law.

1959  Venus occultes the star Regulus. This rare event is used to determine the diameter of Venus and the structure of the Venusian atmosphere.

1967 Beginning of the civil war in Biafra.

1969  In Canada, the Official Languages Act was adopted making French equal to English throughout the Federal government.

1974 West Germany won the FIFA World Cup, beating Netherlands 2-1 in the Final.

1978 The Solomon Islands became independent from the United Kingdom.

1980  Institution of sharia in Iran.

1980 The Safra massacre in Lebanon.

1983 Cold War: Samantha Smith, a U.S.  schoolgirl, flew to the Soviet Union at the invitation of Secretary General Yuri Andropov.

1991  Yugoslav Wars: the Brioni Agreement ended the ten-day independence war in Slovenia against the rest of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

2002 News reports accused MI6 of sheltering Abu Qatada, the supposed European Al Qaeda leader.

2005  A series of four explosions  on London’s transport system killed 56 people, including four alleged suicide bombers and injured over 700 others.

2011 – Roof of a stand in De Grolsch Veste Stadium in Enschede which was under construction collapsed, one killed and 14 injured.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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