Word of the day

June 19, 2012

 

Fainéant – Doing nothing, shiftless, disinclined to work or exertion; a do-nothing, an idle person, a sluggard.


Does this mean farmers have better lives?

June 19, 2012

Barking Up the Wrong Tree has found research which points to the beneficial affects of nature.

Does this mean farmers, gardeners, fishermen/women and others whose work takes them face to face with nature, have better lives than those who spend most of their time indoors?

When feeding out on a cold winter morning in the teeth of a howling southerly it’s difficult to appreciate nature, but most who do it would still prefer that to an inside job.


People-Perception-Pride

June 19, 2012

The theme for  SIDE (South Island Dairy Event) 2012 ,which is being held in Dunedin next month, is people-perception-pride.

Organising committee chair Brangka Munan asks: are we making the most of the people in dairying?

 Workshops will cover topics like Farmer Fatigue & Managing People Effectively. Invercargill lawyer, Mary-Jane Thomas will present a workshop on Employment Law. Lynaire Ryan will take two workshops on career progression and getting the best out of a dairying career.

Other speakers include Dr John Penno who will speak about China, trans-Atlantic rower Rob Hamil and Davey Hughes of Swazi.

“Perception is Your Reality” is the title of our Panel Discussion where four panellists will try to help us better understand this very important, yet often tricky concept, Perception. The panellists this year include Dr Tim Mackle, CEO of DairyNZ, Nicola Toki from Forest and Bird, Dan Steele a
farmer, tourism operator and conservationist, and South Otago dairy farmer Steven Korteweg. BusinessSIDE this year will feature well-known TV presenter Genevieve Westcott, who will be running a session on media. This session will have an interactive component designed to give farmers a better understanding of the media. Organic farmer and innovator Robin Greer returns to SIDE this year as part of the BusinessSIDE programme to talk about the world of manufacturing and the marketing of niche products in New Zealand.
Also returning to SIDE is the legendary Dr Bas Schouten who will present a workshop on calf rearing.
Linked to the theme of perception, is pride.
Are we proud to be dairy farmers? We are all so proud of our world cup winning All Blacks and we should be as proud of our amazing Dairy Industry.

SIDE chair David Holdaway says:

As New Zealand‘s economy struggles to recover from the global financial crisis and the devastating Christchurch earthquake, one of its shining lights has been the success of “our” dairy industry. We are a success industry and we know the important contribution we have had and continue to make to this country’s economy. With this success has come increasing commentary in the media and our local communities of the effects of our industry. While some comments have been positive about the industry, others have been a little more critical of dairying. Admittedly, at times the criticism has been justified but increasingly some criticisms have been rather inaccurate and largely based on misconceptions? . . .

Outside rural media, dairying is too often in the headlines for the wrong reasons. Some of that criticism is justified, but the majority of farmers and the dairying industry as a whole can be proud of what they do and how they do it

That doesn’t mean there isn’t room for improvement on individual farms and in the industry. But acknowledging that and dealing with trouble-spots should not stop us celebrating what we do well.

SIDE is organised by farmers, for farmers. This year’s conference will help participants appreciate what they have to be proud of and help them get even better.


Teaching them to fish

June 19, 2012

Give people a fish and you’ll feed them for a day, teach people to fish and they’ll feed themselves for life.

Volunteer Service Abroad puts that principle into practice and it’s getting money to help with its work:

Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully announced a three-year support package of $24 million for Volunteer Service Abroad (VSA)  to help place skilled New Zealand volunteers in developing countries.

“New Zealand is a world leader in areas like agriculture and tourism development that are vital for developing countries, especially in the Pacific,” Mr McCully says.

“The government wants more New Zealanders to be involved in the delivery of our aid programme. VSA now has a strong focus on supporting economic development and is delivering more opportunities for volunteers in the Pacific.”

In the last year alone VSA volunteers have contributed to; improved access to drinking water for almost 9000 people, the provision of sanitation facilities for more than 3000, the treatment of more than 200 patients, and the upgrade or building of around 90 kilometres of roads.

“VSA is also offering more short-term assignments and partnering with other New Zealand organisations such as Downer NZ, Tuia International, World Vision and Rotary NZ to access more New Zealanders with specific expertise,” Mr McCully says.

Giving security of funding for three years gives the organisation some certainty and VSA is understandably pleased with this:

VSA Chief Executive Officer Debbie Snelson says this is the first time the government has approved up front a three-year funding commitment. It means that VSA can confidently go ahead with its plans to provide more Kiwis with the opportunity to volunteer in the wider Pacific, and to develop new assignments in partnership with New Zealand businesses and organisations.

 

“We see this decision as a real endorsement of our work – and it’s a truly wonderful 50th anniversary present,” she says. “The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is our core funder. Until now it has provided funding on a year-by-year basis. Knowing that we have secure funding from MFAT for the next three years will give us more flexibility to access the Kiwi skills that our overseas partners are looking for.”

 

She says the details of the funding arrangement are still being negotiated, and it is contingent on VSA delivering satisfactory results. These include increasing the number of short-term assignments to about 55 a year, and developing 25 assignments a year in partnership with New Zealand businesses and organisations.

Under the agreement VSA will continue to focus its work in Melanesia, Polynesia and Timor-Leste.

 

“We are confident that we can keep playing a significant role in New Zealand’s overseas development assistance programme, particularly in the area of economic development.”

At least one MP has practical experience of VSA. Invercargill MP Eric Roy was a volunteer in the Pacific in his 20s.

A couple from our district, Bill and Shirley Kingan, have had two postings in Papua New Guinea and are now on a short-term assignment in Samoa.


June 19 in history

June 19, 2012

1179 The Norwegian Battle of Kalvskinnet –  Earl Erling Skakke  was killed, and the battle changed the tide of the civil wars.

1269 King Louis IX of France ordered all Jews found in public without an identifying yellow badge to be fined ten livres of silver.

1306 The Earl of Pembroke’s army defeated Bruce’s Scottish army at the Battle of Methven.

1566 King James I of England and VI of Scotland, was born  (d. 1625).

1586 English colonists left Roanoke Island, N.C., after failing to establish England’s first permanent settlement in America.

1770 Emanuel Swedenborg reported the completion of the Second Coming of Christ in his work True Christian Religion.

1807  Admiral Dmitry Senyavin destroyed the Ottoman fleet in the Battle of Athos.

1816  Battle of Seven Oaks between North West Company and Hudson’s Bay Company, near Winnipeg.

1821  Decisive defeat of the Philikí Etaireía by the Ottomans at Drăgăşani (in Wallachia).

1846 The first officially recorded, organized baseball match was played under Alexander Joy Cartwright’s rules on Hoboken’s Elysian Fields with the New York Base Ball Club defeating the Knickerbockers 23-1. Cartwright umpired.

1850 Princess Louise of the Netherlands married Crown Prince Karl of Sweden-Norway.

1861  Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, British Field Marshal and Commander of British forces in WW I, was born (d. 1928).

1862  The U.S. Congress prohibited slavery in United States territories, nullifying the Dred Scott Case.

1865 Dame May Whitty, English entertainer, was born  (d. 1948).

1865  Over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, slaves in Galveston, were finally informed of their freedom.

1867  Maximilian I of the Mexican Empire was executed by a firing squad in Querétaro.

1870  After all of the Southern States were formally readmitted to the United States, the Confederate States of America ceased to exist.

1875  The Herzegovinian rebellion against the Ottoman Empire began.

1896 Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, was born (d. 1986).

1910  The first Father’s Day was celebrated in Spokane, Washington.

1915  The USS Arizona (BB-39) was launched from the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York..

1929 Thelma Barlow, English actress, was born.

1934  The Communications Act of 1934 established the United States’ Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

1940 The trans-Pacific liner Niagara was sunk by a German mine off the Northland coast..

Niagara sunk by German mines off Northland

1943  Race riots  in Beaumont, Texas.

1944  World War II: First day of the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

1947 Salman Rushdie, Indian author, was born.

1953  Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed at Sing Sing, in New York.

1961  Kuwait declared independence from the United Kingdom

1963 Rory Underwood, English rugby union footballer, was born.

1964  The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved after surviving an 83-day filibuster in the United States Senate.

1966 Shiv Sena was founded in Mumbai.

1970  The Patent Cooperation Treaty was signed.

1977 Rebecca Loos, Dutch model, was born.

1981 Moss Burmester, New Zealand swimmer, was born.

1982  In one of the first militant attacks by Hezbollah, David S. Dodge, president of the American University in Beirut, was kidnapped.

1982 – The body of God’s Banker, Roberto Calvi was found hanging beneath Blackfriars Bridge in London.

1987  Basque separatist group ETA committed one of its most violent attacks, in which a bomb is set off in a supermarket, Hipercor, killing 21 and injuring 45.

1990 The international law defending indigenous peoples, Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989, was ratified for the first time by Norway.

2006  Prime ministers of several northern European nations participated in a ceremonial “laying of the first stone” at the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Spitsbergen, Norway.

2009  British troops began Operation Panther’s Claw, one of the largest air operations in modern times, when more than 350 troops made an aerial assault on Taliban positions and subsequently repelled Taliban counter-attacks.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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