Word of the day

June 16, 2012

Betimes – before the usual or expected time, early; in good time; seasonably; Promptly, speedily; once in a while,  occasionally.


6/10, 5/10

June 16, 2012

I blamed the passing of time for 6/10 in last week’s Stuff’s Biz Quiz, but got only 5/10 in this week’s.


Saturday smiles

June 16, 2012

Various versions of this have been circulating the Internet for a while.

They’re usually attributed to John Cleese, though Snopes rejects that.

The English are feeling concerned about recent events in Syria and have therefore raised their security level from “Miffed” to “Peeved”. Soon, though, security levels may be raised yet again to “Irritated” or even “A Bit Cross”. The English have not used “A Bit Cross” since the blitz in 1940 when tea supplies nearly ran out. Terrorists have been reclassified from “Tiresome” to “A Bloody Nuisance”. The last time the English  issued a “Bloody Nuisance” warning level was in 1588 when threatened by the Spanish Armada.
 
The Scots have raised their level from “Pissed Off” to “Let’s get the Bastards”. They don’t have any other levels. This is the reason they have been used on the front line of the British Army for the last 300 years.
The French have raised their alert level from “Shall We Have Some Wine?” to “White or Red.” That is one step down from ” More Wine”.
 
Italy has increased the alert from “Shout Loudly and Excitedly” to “Elaborate Military Posturing”. Two more levels remain: “Ineffective Combat Operations” and “Change Sides”.
 
The Germans have increased their alert state from “Disdainful Arrogance” to “Dress in Uniform and Sing Marching Songs”. They also have two higher levels: “Lend to a Neighbour” and “Lend them More”.
 
Belgians, on the other hand, are on holiday as usual; the only threat thay are worried about is NATO pulling out of Brussels.
 
The Spanish are all excited to see their new submarines ready to deploy. These beautifully designed subs have glass bottoms so the new Spanish Navy can get a really good look at the old Spanish Navy.
 
Australia, meanwhile, has raised it’s security level from “No Worries” to “She’ll be alright, Mate”. Two more escalation levels remain; “Crikey! I think we’ll have to cancel the barbie this weekend!” and “The barbie is cancelled”. So far no situation has ever warranted use of the final escalation.
What would New Zealand’s security levels be? “A Wee Bit Worried” or “Form a Committee”?

How many’s he got now

June 16, 2012

Winston Peters wants more members for his party.

That should be the aim of all parties ?

The more people actively involved in politics the better it is for democracy.

But I wonder how many NZ First has now?

Parties need only a couple of hundred members to register. I’d be very surprised if NZ First has many more than that.


Fonterra to buy NZ Dairies’ assets

June 16, 2012

Fonterra has conditional agreement to buy NZ Dairies’ assets in South Canterbury.

The acquisition, which is subject to Commerce Commission clearance, would result in NZDL’s existing farmer suppliers being paid in full by the receivers and being able to have their milk processed and paid for from the start of the new dairy season which commences in a few weeks.

Suppliers are owed tens of millions of dollars in total, individuals will be owed hundreds of thousands. If Fonterra’s offer gets Commerce Commission approval and enables receivers to pay then in full that will be a lifeline for not just them but their creditors too.

The Russian-owned dairy factory was placed into receivership on 17 May 2012. The receivers, Colin Gower, Stephen Tubbs and Brian Mayo-Smith of BDO Chartered Accountants, called for bids to buy the business and assets of NZDL soon after.

Fonterra CEO Theo Spierings said the acquisition ensures that the Studholme plant continues to operate and its farm suppliers have certainty that they will be able to sell their milk on a commercial basis from the start of next season.

“The Studholme plant is processing around 150 million litres of milk a year into milk powders for export,” said Mr Spierings.

“It will complement our new Darfield plant which is due to start taking milk in August.

“Our Strategy Refresh has clearly identified the importance of growing milk volumes and optimising our New Zealand manufacturing operations. This transaction helps deliver on that priority.”

As part of the agreement, NZDL’s existing suppliers have been offered the opportunity to supply Fonterra on contracts, which will enable them to become Fonterra fully share backed after the 2012/2013 season and require them to be shareholders within six years.

Fonterra plans to operate the Studholme plant up until the end of the 2012/2013 season pending a decision by the Commerce Commission on Fonterra’s clearance application.

“This means that we are able to collect and process farmers’ milk from the start of the new season, avoiding the prospect of them having to spill milk,” said Mr Spierings.

“The solution we’ve developed with the receivers will mean that suppliers who continue to supply NZDL have a tanker coming up their driveway to take their milk and ensures they still have an income.

“It also means we are able to provide for continued employment to many of NZDL’s staff during this period.”

Many  of NZ Dairies’ suppliers would have been attracted to the company by not needing to buy shares. Fonterra’s offer to take their milk on contract with time to acquire shares gives them breathing space.

If the Commerce Commission takes into account the benefits for suppliers, staff and the wider community there should be no problem with approving the purchase.

It will have to take into account other processors and the presence of a Synlait plant in Canterbury might help.


“Failed” policies didn’t fail

June 16, 2012

The left likes to label the very necessary reforms from the mid 80s to early 90s as “failed” policies.

Au contraire, it’s the countries which haven’t brought their economies into the real world that are in the worst state, as Prime Minister John Key observed after his return from Europe:

 

Look at those countries that are experiencing significant policy challenges today: it’s because they have failed to have the right policy prescriptions.”

Right as in correct as well as right, or at least centre right, politically that is.


June 16 in history

June 16, 2012

1487  Battle of Stoke Field, the final engagement of the Wars of the Roses.

1586 Mary, Queen of Scots, recognised Philip II of Spain as her heir.

1738  – Mary Katharine Goddard, American printer and publisher, was born (d. 1816).

1745  British troops took  Cape Breton Island,.

1745 – Sir William Pepperell captured the French Fortress Louisbourg,  during the War of the Austrian Succession.

1746  War of Austrian Succession: Austria and Sardinia defeated a Franco-Spanish army at the Battle of Piacenza.

1755  French and Indian War: the French surrendered Fort Beauséjour to the British, leading to the expulsion of the Acadians.

1779  Spain declared war on  Great Britain, and the siege of Gibraltar began.

1815  Battle of Ligny and Battle of Quatre Bras, two days before the Battle of Waterloo.

1821 Old Tom Morris, Scottish golfer, was born (d. 1908).

1829 Geronimo, Apache leader, was born  (d. 1909).

1836  The formation of the London Working Men’s Association gave rise to the Chartist Movement.

1846  The Papal conclave of 1846 concluded. Pius IX was elected pope, beginning the longest reign in the history of the papacy (not counting St. Peter).

1858  Abraham Lincoln delivered his House Divided speech in Springfield, Illinois.

1858  Battle of Morar during the Indian Mutiny.

1871  The University Tests Act allowed students to enter the Universities of Oxford,  Cambridge and Durham without religious tests, except for courses in theology.

1883  The Victoria Hall theatre panic in Sunderland killed 183 children.

1890 Stan Laurel, British actor and comedian, was born  (d. 1965).

1891 John Abbott became Canada’s third prime minister.

1897  A treaty annexing the Republic of Hawaii to the United States was signed.

1903  The Ford Motor Company was incorporated.

1903– Roald Amundsen commenced the first east-west navigation of the Northwest Passage.

1904  Eugen Schauman assassinated Nikolai Bobrikov, Governor-General of Finland.

1904 Irish author James Joyce began a relationship with Nora Barnacle, and subsequently used the date to set the actions for his novel Ulysses; traditionally “Bloomsday“.

1911  A 772 gram stony meteorite struck the earth near Kilbourn, Columbia County, Wisconsin damaging a barn.

1912 Enoch Powell, British politician, was born  (d. 1998).

1915  The foundation of the British Women’s Institute.

1922  General election in Irish Free State: large majority to pro-Treaty Sinn Féin.

1923 Baby farmer Daniel Cooper was hanged..

1924  The Whampoa Military Academy was founded.

1925  The most famous Young Pioneer camp of the USSR, Artek, was established.

1929 Pauline Yates, English actress, was born.

1930 Sovnarkom established decree time in the USSR.

1934 Dame Eileen Atkins, English actress, was born.

1937 Erich Segal, American author, was born  (d. 2010).

1938  Joyce Carol Oates, American novelist, was born.

1940  World War II: Marshal Henri Philippe Pétain becomes Premier of Vichy France.

1939 Billy Crash Craddock, American country singer, was born.

1940 – A Communist government was installed in Lithuania.

1948 The storming of the cockpit of the Miss Macao passenger seaplane, operated by a subsidiary of the Cathay Pacific Airways, marked the first aircraft hijacking of a commercial plane.

1955 Pope Pius XII excommunicated Juan Perón.

1958  Imre Nagy, Pál Maléter and other leaders of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising were executed.

1961  Rudolf Nureyev defected at Le Bourget airport in Paris.

1963   Vostok 6 Mission – Cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space.

1967  The three-day Monterey International Pop Music Festival began.

1972 Red Army Faction member Ulrike Meinhof was captured by police in Langenhagen.

1972  The largest single-site hydro-electric power project in Canada started at Churchill Falls, Labrador.

1976 Soweto uprising: a non-violent march by 15,000 students in Soweto turned into days of rioting when police open fire on the crowd and kill 566 children.

1977 Oracle Corporation was incorporated as Software Development Laboratories (SDL) by Larry Ellison, Bob Miner and Ed Oates.

1989  Imre Nagy, the former Hungarian Prime Minister, was reburied in Budapest.

1997 The Dairat Labguer massacre in Algeria; 50 people killed.

2000 Israel complied with UN Security Council Resolutiwen 425  and withdrew from all of Lebanon, except the disputed Sheba Farms.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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