Word of the day

June 8, 2012

Prink – to primp; Spend time making minor adjustments to one’s appearance; to adorn oneself in a showy manner;  dress or groom oneself with elaborate care or vanity; fuss over one’s dress, especially before the mirror.


Friday’s answers

June 8, 2012

Thursday’s questions are here.

An electronic jelly sponge was the prize for anyone who stumped everyone, I’ll accept appeals from the question posers but I don’t think there was a winner.


How matters not who

June 8, 2012

A KPMG survey found that people who work the land aren’t bothered by who owns it:

KPMG interviewed 98 industry leaders for its Agribusiness Agenda, which reveals restricting foreign investment in agriculture land and assets is among their lowest priorities.

No surprises there, anyone with a real connection to farming knows it’s not who owns the land but how they farm it that matters.

Head of Agribusiness Ian Proudfoot told NBR ONLINE industry leaders realise that throughout New Zealand’s history, offshore investment has always featured.

“Initially it came from Britain, then Europe, the United States and Australia, and now the Asian countries who have got surplus cash and are looking for good investment opportunities.

“We can’t turn our back on foreign investment now. That would be inappropriate just because it’s coming from a country where we have less in common than we did with previous investors.”

While people who rarely get closer to a farm than looking over the fence as they travel along main highways are exercised over foreign investment, those directly affected welcome it.

Farmers’ main concern around the Crafar farms issue is that if you refuse offshore investors, there are not enough New Zealand buyers to purchase the land, despite claims to the contrary, he says.

“Without those foreign investors to support market prices, the value of the assets the farmers have are worth less in reality.

“Therefore the amount they can borrow goes down and the ability to grow their business is reduced.”

One argument put forward by opponents of foreign investment is that it puts land prices out of the reach of locals.

Land has never been easy to buy.  The harm done to the businesses of the many who aren’t selling would far outweigh the benefits to the few who might get a bargain if there was less foreign investment or worse, none at all.


Poverty’s poverty

June 8, 2012

First we had child poverty, now we’ve got fuel poverty.

An analysis of hundreds of print media stories on the death of Auckland resident, Mrs Folole Muliaga, after her power was cut off by Mercury Energy in 2007 has found that the wider issue of ‘fuel poverty’ was largely ignored.

Poverty’s poverty.

The people affected and what their families can’t afford are symptoms not the problem.

If you’re poor your budget doesn’t stretch far enough full stop. That won’t improve by taking individual items or family members and tagging them with the word poverty.


June 8 in history

June 8, 2012

68  The Roman Senate accepted emperor Galba.

793 Vikings raided the abbey at Lindisfarne in Northumbria, commonly accepted as the beginning of the Scandinavian invasion of England.

1191 Richard I arrived in Acre thus beginning his crusade.

1405  Richard le Scrope, Archbishop of York and Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk, were executed in York on Henry IV’s orders.

1671 Tomaso Albinoni, Italian composer, was born (d. 1751).

1690  Siddi general Yadi Sakat, razed the Mazagon Fort in Mumbai.

1776  American Revolutionary War: Battle of Trois-Rivières – American  attackers were driven back at Trois-Rivières, Quebec.

1783 Laki, in Iceland, began an eight-month eruption which killed over 9,000 people and started a seven-year famine.

1789  James Madison introduced 12 proposed amendments to the United States Constitution in the United States House of Representatives, 10 of which were ratified by the state legislatures and become the Bill of Rights.

1810 Robert Schumann, German composer, was born (d. 1856).

1856 The community of Pitcairn Islands and descendants of the mutineers of HMS Bounty consisting of 194 people arrived on the Morayshire at Norfolk Island commencing the Third Settlement of the Island.

1862 American Civil War: Battle of Cross Keys – Confederate forces under General Stonewall Jackson saved the Army of Northern Virginia from a Union assault on the James Peninsula led by General George B. McClellan.

1867  Frank Lloyd Wright, American architect, was born (d. 1959).

1868 Three settlers were killed near Ketemarae, Hawera, by Nga Ruahine warriors acting on the orders of the spiritual leader Titokowaru.

Titokowaru's war begins

1887  Herman Hollerith received a patent for his punched card calculator.

1906  Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law, authorising the President to restrict the use of certain parcels of public land with historical or conservation value.

1912  Carl Laemmle incorporated  Universal Pictures.

1916 Francis Crick, English molecular biologist; Nobel laureate (d. 2004).

1928 Second Northern Expedition: The National Revolutionary Army captured Peking, (Beijing).

1933 Joan Rivers, American comedian and author, was born.

1934 Millicent Martin, English singer and actress, was born.

1940 Nancy Sinatra, American singer, was born.

1941 World War II: Allies invaded  Syria and Lebanon.

1942 Chuck Negron, American singer (Three Dog Night), was born.

1942  World War II: Japanese imperial submarines I-21 and I-24 shelled the Australian cities of Sydney and Newcastle.

1948 Milton Berle hosted the debut of Texaco Star Theater.

1949 Celebrities Helen Keller, Dorothy Parker, Danny Kaye, Fredric March, John Garfield, Paul Muni and Edward G. Robinson were named in an FBI report as Communist Party members.

1950 Sir Thomas Blamey became the only Australian-born Field Marshal in Australian history.

1953   A tornado hit Flint, Michigan, and killed 115.

1953  The United States Supreme Court ruled that Washington, D..C. restaurants could not refuse to serve black patrons.

1959  The USS Barbero and United States Postal Service attempted the delivery of mail via Missile Mail.

1962 Nick Rhodes, English musician (Duran Duran), was born.

1966 One of the XB-70 Valkyrie prototypes was destroyed in a mid-air collision with a F-104 Starfighter chase plane during a photo shoot. NASA pilot Joseph A. Walker and United States Air Force test pilot Carl Cross were  killed.

1966  Topeka, Kansas was devastated by a tornado that registers as an “F5″ on the Fujita Scale: the first to exceed US$100 million in damages. Sixteen people were killed, hundreds more injured, and thousands of homes damaged or destroyed.

1967  Six-Day War: The USS Liberty incident occurred , killing 34 and wounding 171.

1968  James Earl Ray was arrested for the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968 – The body of assassinated U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

1974  An F4 tornado struck  Emporia, Kansas,  killing six.

1979 Adine Wilson, New Zealand netball player, was born.

1982 Falklands War: Up to 50 British servicemen were killed in an Argentine air attack on two supply ships – RFA Sir Galahad and RFA Sir Tristram.

1984 Homosexuality was declared legal in New South Wales.

1984 An F5 tornado struck  Barneveld, Wisconsin, killing 9 and injuring 200; 90% of the homes, seventeen out of the eighteen businesses, and the three churches are destroyed.

1986  Kurt Waldheim, former Secretary-General of the United Nations, was elected president of Austria.

1987  The New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament and Arms Control Act was passed into law, establishing this country as a nuclear and biological weapon-free zone.

New Zealand becomes nuclear free

1992 The first World Ocean Day was celebrated.

1995 Downed U.S. Air Force pilot Captain Scott O’Grady was rescued by U.S. Marines in Bosnia.

1995  The first release of the PHP programming language was released by Rasmus Lerdorf.

2001  Mamoru Takuma stabbed 8 elementary school pupils to death during the Osaka school massacre.

2007 Newcastle, New South Wales, was hit by the State’s worst storms and flooding in 30 years resulting in the death of nine people and the grounding of trade ship, the MV Pasha Bulker.

2008 The Akihabara massacre: Tomohiro Katō drove a two-ton truck into a crowded pedestrianised area before leaving the truck and attacking people with a knife, killing seven and injuring ten.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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