Word of the day

June 7, 2012

Minatory –  expressing or conveying a threat; of a menacing or threatening nature.


Thursday’s quiz

June 7, 2012

The floor is yours again.

The questions are yours for the asking with an electronic jelly sponge for anyone who stumps everyone.


Rural round-up

June 7, 2012

Europe not a lost lamb market – Tim Cronshaw:

Large South Island meat exporter Alliance Group plans to grow its sheepmeat trade even further in China, but is cautious about over-reliance on that market. 

    Chief executive Grant Cuff said China was an important destination for the meat processing co-operative, and it was eyeing future growth and aimed to be the largest exporter of lamb to that country. . .

Growing business but staying home – Collette Devlin:

The traditional 50:50 sharemilking career path is declining as land, farm and herd numbers increase. Reporter Collette Devlin speaks with the van der Straatens on equity partnerships in dairying.

    Yesterday, with the arrival of Gypsy Day, the van der Straatens didn not move house or cows; instead they shifted the focus of their business. 

    Contract milkers Arjan and Tracy van der Straaten had been 50:50 sharemilkers but found it difficult to take the final step to ownership, so looked at alternative options. . .  

Nature’s land anchor:

MEASURING the root growth of poplar tree is part of an ongoing study by Landcare Research to look at which trees species are best suited to erosion control.

The roots of a three-year-old poplar tree have been excavated using compressed air and a long lance gun and then laid out in a glasshouse to carry out the tree measurements.

Landcare research scientist Dr Mike Marden says the research initiative has been running for a number of years. . .

Licences plan to keep bees – Gerald Piddock:

Moves are underway to tighten compliance within the beekeeping industry in an effort to curb the spread of diseases. 

Beekeepers currently have to register their hives as required under the National American Foulbrood Pest Management Strategy. 

    They are also encouraged but not required to hold a Disease Elimination Conformity Agreement (DECA). . .

Precision farming better at Lincoln – Gerald Piddock:

The Lincoln University Dairy Farm has had a successful season after moving to precision farming. 

    The new system focuses on a high-energy intake when feeding the cow herd and ensuring good grass growth for the next grazing rotation instead of chasing every blade of grass. . .

    Milk production, profit and cow health were all well above last year’s figures on the 185ha farm.

Breeding dogs still on the agenda – Sally Rae:

Barry Hobbs freely admits that moving from managing    20,000 stock units to just 100 is going to be a major    adjustment.   

Mr Hobbs, who manages Thornicroft Station, a 2832ha property near Lake Mahinerangi, and his wife Pamela are moving to an 11ha property at Herbert in North Otago this winter. . .   

Hereford bull sale a big one – Sally Rae:

Millers Flat Hereford breeders Gray and Robyn Pannett had an      outstanding bull sale on their property last week.   

 Mr and Mrs Pannett, from the Limehills stud, sold 42 bulls      for an average of $7921, with a top price of $39,000 to David and Rosemary Morrow from the Okawa stud, near Mt Somers . . .

Finalist liked getting stuck in – Sally Rae:

Last Monday morning, Pete Gardyne was out shifting calves.   

It was back to work as usual for the Gore sheep, beef and arable farmer after a gruelling few days in Dunedin at the grand final of the National Bank Young Farmer Contest. . .


US dairy offer not up to scratch – Groser

June 7, 2012

Trade Minister Tim Groser says the USA is yet to produce an acceptable offer on dairy access in Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade talks.

Despite two years of formal negotiations, he says, the US is yet to produce anything of substance on the dairy market, the biggest prize for New Zealand in the TPP.

“We are not going to sign up to a deal that doesn’t improve the export position of our principal exports,” he says. “We will wait and play our cards in the endgame.”

The USA dairy lobby must have strength far in excess of its numbers to keep negotiations stalling on the issue of access for our produce.

Any benefit to the relatively small number of them from protection comes at the cost of higher prices and less choice for many millions of consumers.


Overseas worker scheme benefits all

June 7, 2012

New research on the Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme shows it continues to have major benefits for workers, employers and the countries involved, says Immigration Minister Nathan Guy.

“The RSE policy was designed to help with seasonal labour shortages in the horticulture and viticulture industries, and this new research by the Department of Labour shows the scheme is working well.

“Research on earnings and return rates found that the majority of new workers will return to work another season in New Zealand, many for the same employer.

“RSE workers are paid the same rate as New Zealand workers and have the same protections under law. Data shows that mean gross seasonal earnings are around NZ$12,700 per worker, most of whom spend between three and seven months working in New Zealand.

“The 2011 survey of RSE employers found that most have enjoyed better quality, more productive workers and a more stable workforce. Many say that RSE workers have helped their businesses to expand.

“At the same time it is providing valuable income, skills and experience that workers can take back to their home countries.

“Up to 8,000 overseas workers come to New Zealand under the RSE scheme every year. Employers have an obligation to get unemployed New Zealanders into jobs, but there are some industries that just cannot find enough workers, particularly at peak times.

“Up to 50,000 seasonal workers across New Zealand can be required at harvest time and RSE workers make up 6-7,000 of that, which equates to 10-15%.

The scheme could be regarded as a form of foreign aid as most of the money earned goes back to the home countries of the workers and they also gain new skills which could be of use when they go back home.

RSE is working as it was intended and it is good to have the benefits for all concerned confirmed.

However, its success does raise a question: when unemployment is as high as it is, why aren’t more locals willing and able to do this sort of work?


June 7 in history

June 7, 2012

1099 –  The First Crusade: The Siege of Jerusalem began.

1420 – Troops of the Republic of Venice captured Udine, ending the independence of the Patriarchate of Aquileia.

1494 –  Spain and Portugal signed the Treaty of Tordesillas which divided the New World between the two countries.

1628 – The Petition of Right, a major English constitutional document, became law when granted the Royal Assent by Charles I.

1654 –  Louis XIV was crowned King of France.

1692- Port Royal, Jamaica, was hit by a catastrophic earthquake; in just three minutes, 1,600 people were killed and 3,000 seriously injured.

1761 –  John Rennie, Scottish engineer, was born  (d. 1821).

1776 –  Richard Henry Lee presented the “Lee Resolution” to the Continental Congress; it was seconded by John Adams and led to the United States Declaration of Independence.

1778 –  Beau Brummell, English fashion leader, was born  (d. 1840).

1800  David Thompson reached the mouth of the Saskatchewan River in Manitoba.

1831 Amelia Edwards, English author and Egyptologist, was born  (d. 1892).

1832 Asian cholera reached Quebec brought by Irish immigrants, and killed about 6,000 people..

1862  The United States and Britain agreed to suppress the slave trade.

1863 During the French intervention in Mexico, Mexico City wais captured by French troops.

1866  1,800 Fenian raiders were repelled back to the United States after they looted and plundered around Saint-Armand and Frelighsburg, Quebec.

1868 Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Scottish architect, designer, and watercolourist, was born (d. 1928).

1880  War of the Pacific: The Battle of Arica, assault and capture of Morro de Arica (Arica Cape), that ended the Campaña del Desierto (Desert Campaign).

1893 Gandhi’s first act of civil disobedience.

1905  Norway’s parliament dissolved its union with Sweden.

1906  Cunard Line’s RMS Lusitania was launched at the John Brown Shipyard, Glasgow.

1909 Mary Pickford made her screen debut at the age of 16.

1917 Gwendolyn Brooks, American poet, was born (d. 2000).

1917 Dean Martin, American actor, was born (d. 1995).

1917  World War I: Battle of Messines –  the attack on Messines  began at 3.10 a.m. with the explosion of huge mines that had been placed under the German lines by tunnellers. Almost immediately, New Zealand troops of 2nd and 3rd (Rifle) brigades left their trenches and advanced towards the ridge in front of them, on which lay the ruins of Messines village. Australian and British troops on either side of them did the same.

The Battle of Messines

1919  Sette giugno: Riot in Malta, four people killed.

1921 Dorothy Ruth, American horse breeder; adopted daughter of Babe Ruth, was born (d. 1989).

1929 John Napier Turner, Canadian seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada, was born.

1931 Malcolm Morley, English painter, was born.

1936 The Steel Workers Organizing Committee, was founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Philip Murray was elected its first president.

1938 The Douglas DC-4E made its first test flight..

1940 Tom Jones, Welsh singer, was born.

1940  King Haakon VII of Norway, Crown Prince Olav and the Norwegian government left Tromsø  and went into exile in London.

1942  World War II: The Battle of Midway ended.

1942 World War II: Japanese soldiers occupied the American islands of Attu and Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska.

1944 World War II: The steamer Danae carrying 350 Cretan Jews and 250 Cretan partisans was sunk without survivors off the shore of Santorini.

1944  World War II: Battle of Normandy – At Abbey Ardennes members of the SS Division Hitlerjugend massacred 23 Canadian prisoners of war.

1945  King Haakon VII of Norway returned with his family to Oslo after five years in exile.

1948  Edvard Beneš resigned as President of Czechoslovakia rather than signing a Constitution making his nation a Communist state.

1952 Liam Neeson, Northern Irish actor, was born.

1955  Lux Radio Theater signed off the air permanently.

1958 Prince, American musician, was born.

1965  The Supreme Court of the United States decided on Griswold v. Connecticut, effectively legalizing the use of contraception by married couples.

1967  Israeli forces entered Jerusalem during the Six-Day War.

1971  The United States Supreme Court overturned the conviction of Paul Cohen for disturbing the peace, setting the precedent that vulgar writing is protected under the First Amendment.

1972 Karl Urban, New Zealand actor, was born.

1975  Sony introduced the Betamax videocassette recorder for sale to the public.

1976  MacDonalds opened for the first time in New Zealand at Cobham Court, Porirua.

McDonald's arrives in NZ

1977 – 500 million people watched on television as the high day of Jubilee got underway for Queen Elizabeth II.

1981 The Israeli Air Force destroyed Iraq’s Osiraq nuclear reactor during Operation Opera

1982 –  Priscilla Presley opened Graceland to the public

1989  A Surinam Airways DC-8 Super 62 crashed near Paramaribo Airport  Suriname  killing 168.

1991 Mount Pinatubo exploded generating an ash column 7 km (4.5 miles) high.

1993  The Holbeck Hall Hotel in Scarborough, UK, fell into the sea following a landslide.

1995  The long range Boeing 777 entered service with United Airlines.

1998  James Byrd, Jr. was dragged to death in a racially-motivated crime.

2006 British Houses of Parliament were temporarily shut down becasue of an  anthrax alert.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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