Word of the day

17/04/2012

Deturpate – to defile, disfigure, make ugly.


Rural round-up

17/04/2012

The Ploughman’s Lunch – Quote Unquote:

Yesterday we attended the 57th New Zealand Ploughing Championships, held nearby. Thirty-seven farmers had come from as far afield (geddit?) as Temuka, Winton, Asburton and Gore to demonstrate their skill in the conventional (i.e. with a modern tractor), reverse, vintage and horse ploughing (shown above) categories. Judging ploughing is a serious business, requiring assessment of the opening split (10 points), crown (20), main bodywork (40), finish (20), ins and outs (10), general appearance (10) and straightness (20. . .

Last week the Farming Show celebrated its 18th birthday – Farming Show Blog:

It seems only like yesterday two young blokes from Gore took a huge punt by purchasing 4ZG, the first, and only Radio New Zealand station sold to private enterprise.

Even our landlord to be, a delightful old farmer by the name of Bert Horrell, thought we were mad. But once we’d convinced him of our conviction to see this through, he gave us his blessing and some advice I’ve never forgotten. You don’t regret the things you do, you regret the things you don’t do.

What started as a five minute rural segment on a fledgling private radio station way back in 1994, has today grown to a one hour programme broadcast nationwide on a national network. . .

NZ sheep milk heads to Indonesia:

The Prime Minister is in Indonesia pushing New Zealand’s trade links there,  which includes the export of sheep milk there.

Indonesia already has plenty of interest in New   Zealand – in buying our  farm land.

An Indonesian billionaire with close links to former President Suharto’s  family has taken a 50 per cent share in a Southland farming operation based in  Brydon, Winton, and Hedge Hope.

It is a seemingly typical Southland dairy farm, but a closer look shows they  are milking sheep – a flock of 15,000.

Southlander Keith Neylon came up with the idea, saying they produce better  milk than cows. . .

AFFCO and meatworkers both holding firm – Allan Barber:

Getting on for two months into the lock out interspersed with strikes, both sides in this struggle are holding firm. There was a brief moment of hope of some degree of resolution at last week’s mediation, but it appears that after some progress in the morning, it all went downhill in the afternoon with some suggestion the union representatives weren’t all in agreement about what they were after.

At present the meat workers who are union members are in the middle of a seven day strike (or five day depending on your definition of a week) until Friday. However AFFCO says more than half its workforce are on individual employment agreements which means it can continue operating at something close to three quarter capacity. . .

Dexters smallest. oldest UK cattle – Sally Rae:

It’s a long way from Turiwhati to Fairlie.   

 But Dexter cattle enthusiasts Richard and Angela Stevens made  the journey from their West Coast home with their two heifers, Silk and Viyella, to the 114th Mackenzie Highland  Show on Easter Monday.   

 The Dexter breed is the smallest and also one of the oldest types of British cattle. It was the feature breed in the beef  cattle section at the show. . .

A2 signs supply agreement with Synlait Milk:

A2 Corp, the NZAX-listed alternative milk company, has signed a supply agreement with Canterbury processor Synlait Milk as it seeks to launch its infant formula into Asian markets.

The deal will see Synlait Milk source A2 milk from accredited Canterbury suppliers, and manufacture A2 brand nutritional powders for A2 Corp to sell in international markets. With the supply agreement sealed, A2 Corp said it will press on with negotiations to enter into marketing and distribution partnerships. . .

Drive and passion earns upreme title in Otago:

An “enthusiastic and incredibly driven” couple has been named Supreme winners of the 2012 Otago Ballance Farm Environment Awards

Blair and Jane Smith run Newhaven Farms Ltd – a North Otago sheep, beef, forestry and dairy support operation that spans three family-owned properties totalling 1528ha.

Their win was announced at a special Ballance Farm Environment Awards (BFEA) ceremony on April 13. As well as the Supreme award, the Smiths also collected the Ballance Agri-Nutrients Nutrient Management Award, the Massey University Discovery Award, PGG Wrightson Land and Life Award and the Otago Regional Council Sustainable Resource Management Award. . .


NOIC wins irrigation innovation award

17/04/2012

North Otago Irrigation Company has won the 2012 Irrigation New Zealand innovation award for its audited self-management system.

The company’s entry featured a comprehensive programme of  environmental management which had been developed during the last six years.    

The company’s scheme irrigates 10,000ha, with work under way on stage two.   

         Environmental stewardship was part of everything the company  did, NOIC chairman Leigh Hamilton said in a statement.   

         “It starts with our culture and values and is a central part      of all our day-to-day operations, and has been so since the very start  of  the company.”   

        Environmental sustainability was not just something that happened on its own.   

        The company has invested significant time, money and effort into developing environmentally sound farm plans and improving environmental performance right across its scheme, Mr Hamilton said.  

The need to look after the land and soil were important has been a focus of NOIC from the start.

Environmental farm plans were requirements of its resource consent.

They’re independently audited and just part of the company’s determination to ensuring that its commitment to greening North Otago doesn’t just refer to the colour of the grass irrigation helps to grow.


Offenders bi-product of bed hoppers

17/04/2012

It’s harsh – is it also true?:

. . . Most of these young offenders are the bi-product of a bed hopping sperm donor that has no interest in the well-being of the child he produces and contributes little or nothing as the child is bandied around from caregiver to social worker.

Chances are the mother will be on a benefit as the sole bread-winner struggling to make ends meet with the only opportunity of getting more cash being to have another baby.

These children don’t know the love and discipline of a normal Mum and Dad and it is only natural a flirt with the law will occur at a young age. But here again the liberals have ensured any boundaries or consequences are virtually non-existent, at least until the offender has matured into a hard core criminal . . . Garth McVicar.


Labour’s already forgotten lesson

17/04/2012

It’s not easy being in opposition.

You’re criticised if you don’t have policy and you’re criticised when you do.

For several weeks Labour leader David Shearer has been criticised for being missing in action – or is that inaction?

Last week he turned up to comment on Paid Parental leave and yesterday he made a speech about research.

Bill English did the maths and reckons that’s a lot of extra extra spending and borrowing:

“In the past week, it has proposed doubling paid parental leave entitlements, which  would cost taxpayers another $150 million a year.

“And today,  Labour’s leader confirms he backs research and development tax credits,  which would cost at least $300 million a year. He claims this could be  paid for from a new capital gains tax, but that’s not possible as Labour already concedes this would raise little extra revenue in its first few years.

“This from a leader who says he will be thrifty with  taxpayers’ money, but in reality wants to spend more, borrow more and  tax more.

“Together, these two Labour promises alone would amount  to almost $2 billion of more debt over a four-year forecast period.  Labour has clearly learned nothing from its past extravagance. Less than five months since the election, it is already going back to its bad old habits.

“New Zealanders and businesses are being careful with  their own money, prioritising their spending and getting on top of debt. They expect nothing less of the Government. We need only look to many  other countries to see the dire consequences of governments spending and borrowing too much.

“This Government does not want that for New  Zealand. That’s why we’re focused on getting back to surplus by 2014/15, which will provide us with more choices such as repaying debt,  delivering better results from public services and building a more  competitive economy based on higher savings and less debt.

The difference is stark – a government focused on returning to surplus and an opposition that wants to borrow and spend its way back to power .

Labour said they’d accepted the need for a more disciplined approach to spending but they’re obviously already forgotten the lesson.


April 17 in history

17/04/2012

1397  Geoffrey Chaucertold the Canterbury Tales for the first time at the court of Richard II.

1492 Spain and Christopher Columbus signed the Capitulations of Santa Fe for his voyage to Asia to acquire spices.

1521 Martin Luther spoke to the assembly at the Diet of Worms, refusing to recant his teachings.

1524 Giovanni da Verrazzano reached New York harbour.

1555 After 18 months of siege, Siena surrendered to the Florentine-Imperial army. The Republic of Siena was incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Tuscany.

1620 Marguerite Bourgeoys, founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame, was born (d. 1700) .

1797  Sir Ralph Abercromby attacked San Juan, Puerto Rico in what became one of the largest invasions of the Spanish territories in America.

1820 Alexander Joy Cartwright, Inventor of the Modern Game of Baseball, was born (d. 1892).

1837  J. P. Morgan, American financier, was born  (d. 1913) .

1861 American Civil War: Virginia seceded from the United States.

1864 American Civil War: The Battle of Plymouth began.

1865 Mary Surratt was arrested as a conspirator in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

1880 New Zealand’s first inter-city brass band contest was held.

First inter-city brass band contest

1885 Karen Blixen (Isak Dinesen), Danish author, was born (d. 1962) .

1895 The Treaty of Shimonoseki between China and Japan was signed. This marked the end of the First Sino-Japanese War, the defeated Qing Empire was forced to renounce its claims on Korea and to concede the southern portion of the Fengtien province, Taiwan and the Pescadores Islands to Japan.

1905 The Supreme Court of the United States decided Lochner v. New York which held that the “right to free contract” was implicit in the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

1907 The Ellis Island immigration centre processed 11,747 people, more than on any other day.

1918 William Holden, American actor, was born  (d. 1981).

1924 – Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios was formed by the merger of Metro Pictures, Goldwyn Pictures, and the Louis B. Mayer Company.

1929 James Last, German band leader, was born.

1941 World War II: The Kingdom of Yugoslavia surrendered to Germany.

1942 French prisoner of war General Henri Giraud escaped from his castle prison in Festung Königstein.

1945 Brazilian forces liberated the town of Montese, Italy, from German forces.

1949 At midnight 26 Irish counties officially left the British Commonwealth. A 21-gun salute on O’Connell Bridge, Dublin, ushered in the Republic of Ireland.

1957  Nick Hornby, English author, was born.

1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion: A group of CIA financed and trained Cuban refugees landed at the Bay of Pigs in Cuba with the aim of ousting Fidel Castro.

1964 The Ford Motor Company unveiled the Ford Mustang at the New York World’s Fair.

1964  Jerrie Mock became the first woman to circumnavigate the world by air.

1969 Sirhan Sirhan was convicted of assassinating Robert F. Kennedy.

1969 Czechoslovakian Communist Party chairman Alexander Dubček was deposed.

1970 Apollo 13 returned to Earth safely.

1971 The People’s Republic of Bangladesh formed, under Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.

1971  Sierra Leone became a republic.

1973 German counter-terrorist unit GSG 9 founded.

1974 Victoria Beckham, English singer (Spice Girls), was born.

1975  The Cambodian Civil War ended. The Khmer Rouge captureed the capital Phnom Penh and Cambodian government forces surrendered.

1982 Patriation of the Canadian constitution in Ottawa.

1984  Police Constable Yvonne Fletcher was killed by gunfire from the Libyan People’s Bureau in London during a small demonstration outside the embassy. Ten others were wounded.

1986 The Three Hundred and Thirty Five Years’ War between the Netherlands and the Isles of Scilly ended.

2006 – Sami Hammad, a Palestinian suicide bomber, detonated an explosive device in Tel Aviv, killing 11 people and injuring 70.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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