Word of the day

February 20, 2012

Pallucid – transparent, translucent. shining through; reflecting light evenly from all surfaces; admitting the passage of light; easily understood, clear.


Iwi occupying Crafar farm

February 20, 2012

Members of an Iwi have moved on to one of the farms in the Crafar group, claiming it’s their ancestral land and should be returned to them.

Someone with a better understanding of these matters might contradict me but I thought that claims over ancestral land were between Maori and the Crown and could not involve privately owned land.


Rural round-up

February 20, 2012

Council and Transpower overstep mark with buffer zone proposal:

Federated Farmers is opposing the Western Bay of Plenty District Council’s moves to create buffer zones of up to 32 metres either side of electricity transmission lines.

“Federated Farmers strongly opposes the creation of these Electricity Transmission Buffer Zones, because they are solely designed to protect transmission line companies’ interests and circumnavigate individual easement agreements with landowners,” Federated Farmers Bay of Plenty provincial president John Scrimgeour says.

“Transpower says it wants these buffer zones to ensure safety and supply continuity. However, Federated Farmers feels the width of the zones is excessive, as is the level of proposed regulation around them.

“We believe the resulting raft of new rules for earthworks, buildings and subdivision within those zones would hamper landowners’ ability to farm, without meeting Transpower’s original goals. . .

Dairy farmers are better-off  with  industry competition:

All New Zealand dairy farmers are better off because Synlait Milk and other independent dairy companies exist, says Synlait Milk Chief Executive John Penno.

“While independent dairy companies make up a very small portion of the industry, the competitive pressure that Synlait Milk and others bring has brought about faster change within Fonterra than would have occurred had competition not emerged,” Penno said.

Competition between New Zealand dairy companies is not about the international markets. It is all about competition for farmer’s milk. Because of competition, Fonterra pays farmers more for their milk, which forces independent dairy companies to develop their businesses faster to keep one step ahead, says Penno. . .

Visit to top kiwi farm impresses Swedish delegation:

Members of a Swedish delegation will go home with positive views of New Zealand agriculture after visiting an award-winning farm in the Waikato

On February 9, delegates from the Swedish Parliamentary Committee on Environment and Agriculture were hosted by the New Zealand Farm Environment (NZFE) Trust on Gray and Marilyn Baldwin’s organic dairy farm near Putaruru.

The Baldwins and their sharemilkers, Hamish and Jane Putt, were Supreme winners of the 2009 Waikato Ballance Farm Environment Awards. . .

Dairy debate is getting really interesting – Allan Barber:

My piece last week supporting the OIO decision on the Crafar farms deal provoked a lot of comment, most of it negative, but also, interestingly, it sparked a sometimes acrimonious debate between several respondents about the Israeli – Palestinian situation. Now that was something I didn’t expect, not considering myself to be remotely competent to cover that sort of global issue.

Since my piece appeared I have picked up some really interesting columns by Fran O’Sullivan in the NZ Herald and Rod Oram in the Sunday Star Times which took diametrically opposing views on the same topic, O’Sullivan in support and Oram totally against. . .

Hawke’s Bay shearers head to world champs:

Two Hawke’s Bay shearers will represent New Zealand at the world shearing championships, to be held during the Golden Shears in Masterton, later this month.

It is an upset for David Fagan who was the favourite heading into the final shear-off, the Southern Shears, in Gore at the weekend. . .

RD1 gets behind Dairy Women’s Network:

In an exclusive agreement, RD1 has committed to sponsoring the Dairy Women’s Network regional groups. The partnership is aimed at growing the reach and effectiveness of these groups over a three year period, helping to increase the success of women in dairying.

RD1 CEO Sarah Kennedy, now a leading woman in the dairy industry, sees some direct correlations between the two organisations.

“RD1 and the Dairy Women’s Network aspire to add value to dairy businesses. We also both have nationwide networks with a strong regional focus” says Kennedy. “The Dairy Women’s Network regional groups are not only the heart of that organisation, they are the grassroots of our industry, much like the RD1 store network. . .

Dairy Women’s Network partners with training leader AgITO:

Dairy Women’s Network has announced its partnership with one of New Zealand’s largest and most respected industry training organisations, AgITO. The partnership was formed in an effort to open up further education possibilities for New Zealand dairying women.

“We are very excited about this partnership,” said Kevin Bryant, Chief Executive for AgITO. “It gives us the opportunity to further support and help upskill women who are such an important group in making the daily business management decisions within the dairy industry.”

According to Mr Bryant, AgITO has a number of qualification options suitable for dairy women who are looking to further develop their careers or gain skills and knowledge in specific key areas from improving milk quality to business management and planning. . .


Should it be Redpeace?

February 20, 2012

A criticism of many green parties and organisations is that they are watermelons with a green shell covering a red heart.

Dr Patrick Moore, a founding member of Greenpeace, provides support for that contention in his book Confessions of  Greenpeace dropout: the making of a sensible environmentalist.

You could call me a Greenpeace dropout, but that is not an entirely  accurate description of how or why I left the organization 15 years  after I helped create it. I’d like to think Greenpeace left me, rather  than the other way around, but that too is not entirely correct.

The truth is Greenpeace and I underwent divergent evolutions. I  became a sensible environmentalist; Greenpeace became increasingly  senseless as it adopted an agenda that is antiscience, antibusiness, and downright antihuman. . .

While it might be anti-business, Greenpeace is not above exploiting people or using dubious commercial methods to raise money and lure new recruits.

Those people, usually young, who badger you to join up in the street are on commission and only get paid if and when those they sign up don’t pull out within the few day’s grace period in which they’re permitted to do so after joining.

. . . During the early 1980s two things happened that altered my  perspective on the direction in which environmentalism, in general, and  Greenpeace, in particular, were heading. The first was my introduction  to the concept of sustainable development at a global meeting of  environmentalists. The second was the adoption of policies by my fellow  Greenpeacers that I considered extremist and irrational. These two  developments would set the stage for my transformation from a radical  activist into a sensible environmentalist.

In 1982, the United Nations held a conference in Nairobi to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the first UN Environment Conference in  Stockholm, which I had also attended. I was one of 85 environmental  leaders from around the world who were invited to craft a statement of our  collective goals for environmental protection. It quickly became  apparent there were two nearly opposite perspectives in the room—the  antidevelopment  perspective of environmentalists from wealthy industrialized countries  and the prodevelopment perspective of environmentalists from the poor  developing countries.

As one developing country activist put it, taking a stand against  development in his woefully poor country would get him laughed out of  the room. It was hard to argue with his position. A well-fed person has  many problems, a hungry person has but one. The same is true for  development, or lack of it. We could see the tragic reality of poverty  on the outskirts of our Kenyan host city. Those of us from  industrialized countries recognized we had to be in favor of some kind  of development, preferably the kind that didn’t ruin the environment in  the process. Thus the concept of sustainable development was born.

This was when I first fully realized there was another step beyond  pure environmental activism. The real challenge was to figure out how to take the environmental values we had helped create and weave them into  the social and economic fabric of our culture. This had to be done in  ways that didn’t undermine the economy and were socially acceptable. It  was clearly a question of careful balance, not dogmatic adherence to a  single principle. . .

It is rank hypocrisy for people from developed countries with all the benefits of first world economies and the first world infrastructure and services that supports to tell people in poor countries development is bad.

Sustainable development is the balance between economic, environmental and social requirements. Its proponents aren’t anti-business or anti-people and they welcome science because it provides evidence-based information and solutions rather than greenwash which might look fine but might do no good and at times causes harm to the environment.

An example of this is recycling. It certainly reduces the amount of waste sent to landfills but the environmental cost of transporting and processing is sometimes greater than that of dumping.

. . .  By the early 1980s a  majority of the public, at least in the Western democracies, agreed with us that the environment should be taken into account in all our  activities. When most people agree with you it is probably time to stop  beating them over the head and sit down with them to seek solutions to  our environmental problems. 

At the same time I chose to become less militant and more diplomatic, my Greenpeace colleagues became more extreme and intolerant of  dissenting opinions from within.

In the early days we debated complex issues openly and often. It was a wonderful group to engage with in wide-ranging environmental policy  discussions. The intellectual energy in the organization was infectious. We frequently disagreed about specific issues, yet our ultimate vision  was largely shared. Importantly, we strove to be scientifically  accurate. For years this had been the topic of many of our internal  debates. I was the only Greenpeace activist with a PhD in ecology, and  because I wouldn’t allow exaggeration beyond reason I quickly earned the nickname “Dr. Truth.” It wasn’t always meant as a compliment. Despite  my efforts, the movement abandoned science and logic somewhere in the  mid-1980s, just as society was adopting the more reasonable items on our environmental agenda.

Ironically, this retreat from science and logic was partly a response to society’s growing acceptance of environmental values. Some activists simply couldn’t make the transition from confrontation to consensus; it was as if they needed a common enemy. When a majority of people decide  they agree with all your reasonable ideas the only way you can remain  confrontational and antiestablishment is to adopt ever more extreme  positions, eventually abandoning science and logic altogether in favor  of zero-tolerance policies. . .

We have only one world and most people agree on the importance of looking after it. There is however, disagreement on the how and finding a way to do it in a way which is not anti-business or anti-people is much more likely to succeed than the radical recipe promoted by red-greens.

To a  considerable extent the environmental movement was hijacked by political and social activists who learned to use green language to cloak agendas that had more to do with anticapitalism and antiglobalization than with science or ecology. I remember visiting our Toronto office in 1985 and  being surprised at how many of the new recruits were sporting army  fatigues and red berets in support of the Sandinistas.

I don’t blame them for seizing the opportunity. There was a lot of  power in our movement and they saw how it could be turned to serve their agendas of revolutionary change and class struggle. But I differed with them because they were extremists who confused the issues and the  public about the nature of our environment and our place in it. To this  day they use the word industry as if it were a swear word. The same goes for multinational, chemical, genetic, corporate, globalization, and a  host of other perfectly useful terms. Their propaganda campaign is aimed at promoting an ideology that I believe would be extremely damaging to  both civilization and the environment. . .

Those perfectly useful terms are almost always used with negative connotations by radical environmentalists and their ideology is dangerous.

. . . The main purpose of this book is to establish a new approach to  environmentalism and to define sustainability as the key to achieving  environmental goals. This requires embracing humans as a positive  element in evolution rather than viewing us as some kind of mistake. The celebrated Canadian author Farley Mowat has described humans as a “fatally flawed species.” This kind of pessimism may be politically  correct today, but it is terribly self-defeating. Short of mass suicide  there doesn’t seem to be an appropriate response. I believe we should  celebrate our existence and constantly put our minds toward making the  world a better place for people and all the other species we share it  with. . .

Unlike those he criticise, Moore is optimistic about the future of the world and people’s place in it.

He also has some suggestions on what we could do to protect and enhance the environment at no great cost to the economy or people:

• We should be growing more trees and using more wood, not  cutting fewer trees and using less wood as Greenpeace and its allies  contend. Wood is the most important renewable material and  energy resource.

• Those countries that have reserves of potential hydroelectric  energy should build the dams required to deliver that energy. There is  nothing wrong with creating more lakes in this world.

• Nuclear energy is essential for our future energy supply,  especially if we wish to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. It has  proven to be clean safe, reliable, and cost-effective.

• Geothermal heat pumps, which too few people know about, are far  more important and cost-effective than either solar panels or wind mills as a source of renewable energy. They should be required in all new  buildings unless there is a good reason to use some other technology for heating, cooling, and making hot water.

• The most effective way to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels is  to encourage the development of technologies that require less or no  fossil fuels to operate. Electric cars, heat pumps, nuclear and  hydroelectric energy, and biofuels are the answer, not cumbersome  regulatory systems that stifle economic activity.

• Genetic science, including genetic engineering, will improve  nutrition and end malnutrition, improve crop yields, reduce the  environmental impact of farming, and make people and the environment  healthier.

• Many activist campaigns designed to make us fear useful chemicals are based on misinformation and unwarranted fear.

• Aquaculture, including salmon and shrimp farming, will be one of  our most important future sources of healthy food. It will also take  pressure off depleted wild fish stocks and will employ millions of  people productively.

• There is no cause for alarm about climate change. The climate is  always changing. Some of the proposed “solutions” would be far worse  than any imaginable consequence of global warming, which will likely be  mostly positive. Cooling is what we should fear.

• Poverty is the worst environmental problem. Wealth and urbanization will stabilize the human population. Agriculture should be mechanized  throughout the developing world. Disease and malnutrition can be largely eliminated by the application of modern technology. Health care,  sanitation, literacy, and electrification should be provided to  everyone.

• No whale or dolphin should be killed or captured anywhere, ever.  This is one of my few religious beliefs. They are the only species on  earth whose brains are larger than ours and it is impossible to kill or  capture them humanely.

Hat tip: Kiwiblog and NZ Conservative

 


Death stats reflect aging population

February 20, 2012

The number of deaths registered in New Zealand last year passed 30,000 for the first time.

There were 30,080 deaths registered in the December 2011 year, an increase of 1,640 (6 percent) from the December 2010 year.

“The increase in deaths is not unexpected,” Population Statistics manager Andrea Blackburn said. “The number of deaths is gradually increasing due to population growth in the older age groups.”

Statistics NZ’s mid-range population projections indicate that deaths will continue to increase, and are expected to surpass 40,000 in 2029 and 50,000 in 2042.

While more of us are dying fewer are being born:

Meanwhile, births decreased in the December 2011 year. There were 61,400 live births registered in New Zealand in the December 2011 year, down 2,490 from the December 2010 year. Live births, combined with the deaths, resulted in a natural increase (live births minus deaths) of 31,320, down from 35,460 in the December 2010 year.

With the aging population and more people having fewer children and having them later, the trend for more deaths and smaller natural population increases will continue.

If we want a bigger population, faster, we’ll have to rely on immigration.


Night milk potent sleeping potion

February 20, 2012

A warm drink of milk is an old fashioned remedy for sleeplessness and Synlait has come up with something to make the sleeping potion even more potent.

Canterbury dairy company Synlait is trialling a new milk powder designed to help people with sleeping disorders.

Synlait Night Milk is made from milk collected from cows during the hours of darkness and is processed at the company’s nutritional plant in Dunsandel.

General manager for market and product development, Dr Tony McKenna, says cows produce a sleep-promoting hormone called melatonin at night and this is then expressed in their milk.

The company wants cows to be milked at 2am and is paying a premium for milk produced then.

It would need to.

Getting up before the sun makes milking hard enough on staff. If they are required to get up in the middle of the night to milk they would deserve extra pay.


Quote of the day

February 20, 2012

Mr Familton said there were two possible reactions – accepting the increase as a one-off and the council “going  happily about its business”, or reducing the increase.   

 Personally, he was inclined towards the latter, he said. While the council had performed well in the past four years, it needed to be innovative.   

 “The total increase of 7.4% is a concern. It is a challenge  to those on fixed incomes and a drag on business,” he said.   

 “Let this be a warning – we need to do something about it,”  he said.   Waitaki District mayor Alex Familton responding to a projected rates increase of 7.4% .


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