Meeting market without mangling message

An Australian priest is asking for crosses to be removed from hot cross buns  which are on sale in supermarkets already –  13 weeks before Easter.

Burnie priest Father Tony Kennedy said hot cross buns were originally eaten on Good Friday to remind people of the day Jesus died on the cross but they had lost much of their religious significance.

Lost much of their significance? I’d say they’ve lost all significance and have merely become another seasonal food item sold well out of season.

Meanwhile, Coles media spokesman Jon Church said it was up to Coles customers to decide how they would mark religious holidays.

“We put the cross on our buns because that’s how they like them,” he said. The buns went on sale early because customers wanted it.

If customers like a cross why give it to them for only 13 weeks before Easter, why not give them crosses for the other 39 weeks as well?

Has the supermarket asked customers if they want the cross or if it’s just that the cross identifies a type of bun they want?

Has the supermarket tried selling the buns made to that recipe without the cross?  That way they could meet the market without mangling the message of Easter.

Hot crossless buns might be just as popular.

They might be even more popular because they’d sell to people like me who react against all these desperate attempts to  get customers to buy more by ignoring them completely.

3 Responses to Meeting market without mangling message

  1. Andrei says:

    Has the supermarket tried selling the buns made to that recipe without the cross?

    Don’t you recall a huge fuss some years ago when a bakery marketed “Easter Buns” without the cross?

    Good Friday is a strict fast day, stricter for us than for the Latins who presumably came up with Hot Cross Buns as a way to keep the fast with something palatable and unique to the day to make it easier.

    They are not very special if you can buy them anytime – the year looses something of its rhythm I suppose.

    The priest making a fuss is spitting into the wind though – who values traditions anymore – except for the superficial aspects which can be deployed to make a dollar.

    Like

  2. Stephanie says:

    I much prefer to make my own. Nom nom nom nom

    Like

  3. homepaddock says:

    “who values traditions anymore – except for the superficial aspects which can be deployed to make a dollar.”

    Those of us who deliberately don’t buy in response to such things.

    Stephanie – Homemade are definitely best – do you have a recipe you are willing to share?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: