Word of the day

September 29, 2011

Perspicaciousness – keenness of perception and discernment; having or showing penetrating mental discernment; clear-sighted.


8/15

September 29, 2011

8/15 in Stuff’s food and fashion quiz (most correct answers for food rather than fashion).


Thursday’s quiz

September 29, 2011

1. Who said: “Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy,
boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence. In other words, it is war minus the shooting.”?

2. It’s guerrier in French,  guerriero in Italian, guerrero in Spanish (to my surprise I couldn’t find it in Maori, there’s a bonus if you can), what is it in English?

3. A statue of whom overlooks the Octagon in Dunedin?

4. What are the capital cities of Romania, Samoa and Tonga?

5. The Hang Seng is the stock exchange of which country?


Rage against the writing of a slight

September 29, 2011

Diana Wichtel was less than enthusiastic in her review in The Listener of Rage, a drama based on the 1981 Spirngbok tour.

Co-writerTom Scott responded with this letter to the editor:

RAGE, RAGE
I have just read Diana Wichtel’s scornful review of Rage, which I co-wrote and co-produced for TV1 (Television, September 17).
My first response was to wonder if Diana and I had just recently gone through a particularly nasty and brutal divorce, but I have no recollection of marrying her. This doesn’t mean I didn’t marry her. I’m just saying I could well have blacked it out.

I am prepared to go to counselling with her if you think this would help sort out this mystery.

I missed seeing Rage when it screened but I’m now planning to watch it in the hope that the script is as witty as the co-writer’s letter.


Gallagher gains lifetime achievement award

September 29, 2011

Bill (now Sir William) Gallagher made his first electric fence in 1937.

How he did it and the development of his business makes inspirational reading.

He has made a significant contribution to farming, business and New Zealand in general. The  New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Trust has recognised his contribution to the dairy sector, in particular by presenting him with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Trust chair Barbara Kuriger says SWilliam is ir known as one of New Zealand’s most astute businessmen and chairs the successful Hamilton exporter of animal management, fencing and security systems, Gallagher Group.

“We selected Sir William for this award as he has taken a proud and iconic New Zealand company and succeeded internationally. He is also viewed by the trustees as an outstanding New Zealander and a fine example to current and prospective business people.

“His company’s contribution to New Zealand farming systems has been huge.”

. . . In presenting the award, Mrs Kuriger said: “Sir William is a natural leader, whose communication skills and business influence is nationally and internationally recognised. He has created a work environment that encourages personal empowerment and independent thinking.

“A true entrepreneur, he has a sense of urgency and controlled risk taking, which is supported and managed by the positive team he works with.”

She said Sir William’s major skill was his ability to communicate across language and social barriers with an emphasis on ethics and integrity in his professional and personal dealings.

“Sir William has a strong and active commitment to the environment he lives and works in – he is a major sponsor of the Rescue Helicopter, Waikato Stadium, Mounted Police, Gallagher Family Hospice, Gallagher Hockey Centre and the establishment of the Performing Arts centre at Waikato University.”

There probably isn’t a farm in New Zealand which doesn’t use electric fences and Galaher’s electric fencing has also been one of New Zealand’s export success stories.

NZDIAT’s lifetime award is well deserved recognition of not only what Sir William has done but the way he has done it.


Accidental MPs

September 29, 2011

Retiring MP Sue Kedgley admitted in her valedictory speech that she entered parliament by accident:

I am what you might call an accidental MP – someone who arrived in this House by accident, not by design. I casually agreed to put my name on a Green Party list for the ninety-nine election, at a time when the Green Party was polling at zero per cent. And the next thing I knew Jeanette Fitzsimons was on the phone, telling me I had just become an MP.

This isn’t the first time MPs who thought they had no hope of being MPs have found themselves with a  seat in parliament.

In 2002 National bled votes to Act, United Future (or whatever it was called then) and New Zealand First candidates who stood with little if any hope of winning gained a list seat. Few of those accidental MPs did anything of note and most have now thankfully been forgotten.

MMP’s lists enable people who would never win an electorate to get into parliament. But we got accidental MPs with FPP too. In 1990 a high tide for National brought in candidates in seats previously thought unwinnable by the party, for example Gilbert Myles who won the seat of Roskill.

This reinforces the importance of parties having strong membership and quality candidates.

It’s all very well running people who haven’t got what it takes to be MPs in seats they’ll never win to wave their parties’ flags. But putting them on the list where they might be swept into parliament by an unexpected tail wind or selecting them in electorates they could win inflicts them on us all.

Being a good MP is a very demanding job, parties owe it to us to ensure the people they select have not just the skills and abilities to do it well but also have the will to do it at all.


September 29 in history

September 29, 2011

522 BC – Darius I of Persia killed the Magian usurper Gaumâta, securing his hold as king of the Persian Empire.

480 BC  Battle of Salamis: The Greek fleet under Themistocles defeats the Persian fleet under Xerxes I.

61 BC  Pompey the Great celebrated his third triumph for victories over the pirates and the end of the Mithridatic Wars on his 45th birthday.

1227  Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, was excommunicated by Pope Gregory IX for his failure to participate in the Crusades.

1364  Battle of Auray: English forces defeated the French in Brittany; end of the Breton War of Succession.

1547 Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes  Saavedra was born (d. 1616).

1650 Henry Robinson opened his Office of Addresses and Encounters – the first historically documented dating service – in Threadneedle Street, London.

1717  An earthquake struck Antigua Guatemala, destroying much of the city’s architecture and making authorities consider moving the capital to a different city.

1758 Horatio Nelson was born (d. 1805).

1810 English author Elizabeth Gaskell was born (d. 1865).

1829  The Metropolitan Police of London, later also known as the Met, was founded.

1848  Battle of Pákozd: Hungarian forces defeated Croats at Pákozd; the first battle of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848.

1850  The Roman Catholic hierarchy was re-established in England and Wales by Pope Pius IX.

1862  The first professional opera performance in New Zealand was put on by members of ‘The English Opera Troupe’ and the Royal Princess Theatre Company.

NZ's first professional opera performance

1864  American Civil War: The Battle of Chaffin’s Farm.

1885 The first practical public electric tramway in the world opened in Blackpool.

1907 The cornerstone was laid at Washington National Cathedral.

1907 US singer Gene Autry was born (d. 1998).

1911 Italy declared war on the Ottoman Empire.

1913 US film director Stanley Kramer was born (d. 2001).

1916 John D. Rockefeller became the first billionaire.

1918  World War I: The Hindenburg Line was broken by Allied forces. Bulgaria signed an armistice

1932  Chaco War: Last day of the Battle of Boquerón between Paraguay and Bolivia.

1935 US musician Jerry Lee Lewis was born.

1936 Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi was born.

1941  World War II: Holocaust in Kiev German Einsatzgruppe C began the Babi Yar massacre.

1943 Polish president Lech Walsea was born.

1943  World War II: U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio signed an armistice  aboard the Royal Navy battleship HMS Nelson off Malta.

1951 Michelle Bachelet, former President of Chile, was born.

1954  The convention establishing CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) was signed.

1956 English athlete Sir Sebastian Coe was born.

1957 20 MCi (740 petabecquerels) of radioactive material was released in an explosion at the Soviet Mayak nuclear plant at Chelyabinsk.

1961 Julia Gillard, Australian politician, Prime Minister of Australia, was born.

1962  Alouette 1, the first Canadian satellite, was launched.

1963 The second period of the Second Vatican Council opened.

1963  The University of East Anglia was established in Norwich.

1964  The Argentine comic strip Mafalda, by Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known by his pen name Quino, was published for the first time.

1966  The Chevrolet Camaro, originally named Panther, was introduced.

1975  WGPR in Detroit, Michigan, becomes the world’s first black-owned-and-operated television station.

1979  Pope John Paul II became the first pope to set foot on Irish soil.

1988 Space Shuttle: NASA launched STS-26, the return to flight mission.

1990  Construction of the Washington National Cathedral was completed.

1990 The YF-22, which later became the F-22 Raptor, flew for the first time.

1991  Military coup in Haiti.

1992  Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Mello resigned.

1995 The United States Navy disbanded Fighter Squadron 84 (VF-84), nicknamed the “Jolly Rogers”.

2004 The asteroid 4179 Toutatis passed within four lunar distances of Earth.

2004 – The Burt Rutan Ansari X Prize entry SpaceShipOne performed a successful spaceflight, the first of two required to win the prize.

2006  Gol Transportes Aéreos Flight 1907 collided in mid-air with an Embraer Legacy business jet, killing 154 total people, and triggering a Brazilian aviation crisis.

2007  Calder Hall, the world’s first commercial nuclear power station, was demolished in a controlled explosion.

2008  The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell  777.68 points, the largest single-day point loss in its history.

2009 An 8.0 magnitude earthquake near the Samoan Islands caused a tsunami .

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: