4/10

September 18, 2011

4/10  in the Herald’s entertainment quiz– all but one of which were guesses.


Rural round-up

September 18, 2011

Complete control of supply chain impossible – Allan Barber:

Nuffield Scholar and recently elected Meat and Wool Director, James Parsons, has been promoting the need for an integrated supply chain from farmer to consumer, if farmers are to reap the rewards of their endeavours. His solution for New Zealand to get out of the commodity trap – which means farmers are far removed from the consumer and last in line to receive a share of the returns – is to redesign the supply chain . . .

 In reponse to that he also writes Supply chain debate :

Trudi Baird from Southland has written a very full response to my recent column in Farmers Weekly about the difficulty of controlling the supply chain and I have published her comments in full because I am very impressed by her arguments and the thoroughness of her analysis . . .

New Zealand to host ag-biotech international conference :

The Government is investing $100,000 to bring international agricultural biotechnology experts to New Zealand next year, Minister of Science and Innovation Wayne Mapp announced today.

New Zealand was announced as the host for the 2012 Agricultural Biotechnology International Conference at the closing of the 2011 conference in South Africa.

“This prestigious conference will bring hundreds of international delegates to New Zealand,” said Dr Mapp. “It is a chance to showcase New Zealand and Australian biotech capability.” . . .

North Otago couples’ little piggies got to market – Sally Rae:

North Otago pig farmers Gus and Sue Morton are not only bringing home the bacon – they are selling it direct to the public.   

Mr and Mrs Morton, who market their produce through the Waitaki Bacon and Ham label – focusing on a “farm gate to plate” experience for the consumer, have added a retail shop      to their business.   

A top dogs’ tale – Debbie Gregory:

EFFORTS to make the Whatatutu Sheep Dog Trial Club’s annual dog sale one of the best in the country are paying dividends with the good reputation of the East Coast dogs leading the way.

A top price of $5000 was paid for a three-year-old huntaway bitch offered by Graeme Cook and the top price in the heading dogs was $4600 among 40 dogs offered for sale at the club’s second annual sale during the weekend.

Among the dogs sold were two bought to become celebrities overseas. . .

Farmers urged to clean up act – Gerald Piddock:

Synlait boss John Penno is urging the dairy industry to do more to influence
farmers to improve their environmental record.

The industry’s dairy companies should play a major role in this by ensuring
their farmers produced their milk at a high environmental standard, he told
farmers and environmentalists at the Lower Waitaki River Management Society’s
annual meeting in Glenavy . . .

Good reason for optimism in dairying – Gerald Piddock:

Dairy farmers are going into the new season with a high level of optimism.
This is due to the extremely mild winter and the unchanged opening forecast
payout from Fonterra.

Good autumn growing conditions meant most dairy farms went into the winter
with good pasture covers and cows in good condition.

Covers at the start of calving in August around South Canterbury were high
and some farmers had to bring their cows back earlier from winter grazing to
keep pasture levels under control, Federated Farmers South Canterbury dairy
chairman Ryan O’Sullivan said.

Preparing ewes for triplets now the aim – Gerald Piddock:

Forty years ago a major topic of discussion among sheep farmers in New Zealand was would they be able to manage ewes with twins.

Fast forward to today and a similar debate is occurring over how farmers should be managing triplets, AgResearch scientist Tom Fraser says.

“I think we do have to come to grips with it and I’m not sure what the answer
is,” Mr Fraser told farmers at a Beef+Lamb field day held near Mt Somers.

Grass-fed beef a hit at major Tokyo festival:

Over three quarters of a million Japanese people attended the Super Yosakoi food, music and dance festival in Tokyo recently and many got a taste of New Zealand grass-fed beef. By the end of the festival, 400 kilograms of the beef had been barbecued and eaten.

Introducing Japanese consumers to New Zealand grass-fed beef was the point of Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s (B+LNZ) food stand at the festival and those who tasted the beef loved it, B+LNZ Market Manager Japan, John Hundleby said.

A fistful of whiter than white wool – Jon Morgan:

Alan Johanson stretches down the side of the romney ram his heading dog Ozzie
has baled up for him and clutches a fistful of fleece.

“Feel that,” he offers. “You can squeeze it as hard as you can but you can’t move it. It won’t compress any further. It stays one big thick handful.”

He’s right. A grab of the greasy wool confirms this. It is a solid, unmoving mass . . .

Science still the key to our future – Jon Morgan:

Scientists by nature are cautious. The thoroughness of their methods teaches them that. Even when they arrive at a tried, tested and peer-reviewed result they are reluctant to speak in absolutes.

The word “breakthrough” is anathema to them. They would rather run naked across a Rugby World Cup pitch than use it.

So it was with some surprise that I saw “breakthrough” in the tag line of an email from the Crown science institute, AgResearch . . .


More deaths without 1080

September 18, 2011

Peter Dunne reckons the death of seven keas from 1080 poisoning is unacceptable.

“DoC currently spends less than $2 million a year on researching and developing alternatives. With that level of investment taxpayers dollars will still be killing kea for many years to come.”

“If we are to save our native bird populations we need to substantially increase the amount of funding available to develop anti-1080 alternatives. DoC and other agencies responsible for pest control need to significantly contribute to this out of their existing budgets,” said Mr Dunne.

DoC’s budget is already overstretched. One of the reasons for that is the large amount of extra land added to the conservation estate by the previous government in which Dunne was a minister.

Alternatives to 1080 would be good but until we get some using the poison is the lesser of two evils.

While no deaths of native birds should be considered acceptable, not using 1080 would result in more death and destruction.

Trapping and shooting is used to kill possums and other pests where possible but they can’t be used in dense bush and rough terrain.

At the moment 1080 is the best method of control in these areas. Without it uncontrolled populations of pests would kill many more native birds and trees.

He wants DoC


Money for irrigation and cleaner water

September 18, 2011

Agriculture Minister David Carter  has announced the opening 0f applications for the Irrigation Acceleration Fund:

“NZIER research suggests the fund could support 340,000ha of new irrigation, which could boost exports by $1.4 billion a year by 2018, rising to $4 billion a year by 2026.

“All successful projects will need to be committed to good industry practice that promotes efficient water use and environmental management, particularly around land-use intensification.  Irrigation good practice is essential if we are to protect our vital water resource for tomorrow,” says Mr Carter.  

The fund will support regional scale rural water infrastructure proposals that address:

  • regional rural water infrastructure
  • community irrigation schemes
  • strategic water management studies.

Mr Carter says the Government will contribute up to 50 percent through the fund to successful proposals.  Applications will be assessed by MAF, with input from a panel of independent experts.  The final decision will be made by the Director General of MAF.

The same day Environment Minister Nick Smith announced the criteria and assessment panel for the new fund to help councils and communities clean-up nationally significant water bodies that have been polluted.

That fund was one of the recommendations of the Land and Water Forum which has been engaged by the Government to progress the next stage of policy work on setting limits on water quality, quantity and allocation.

Progress on fresh water reform stalled for a decade because of highly polarised positions. The Land and Water Forum has done a great job bringing together farmers, environmentalists, industry and iwi to develop an agreed way forward. We are releasing today the Government’s high level response to the Land and Water Forum’s April report and are engaging the Forum to do further work on the complex issue of setting water limits and improving systems for allocation,” the Ministers said.

Federated Farmers says the announcements are about the cleaning up from the  past and looking after the future:

The Irrigation Acceleration Fund will help transform and future proof New Zealand agriculture on the same day another fund, the ‘Fresh Start for Fresh Water Clean Up Fund’, will help communities remedy the legacy of the past. . . .

Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers RMA and environment spokesperson said:

“There’s no coincidence that it is announced concurrently with the ‘Fresh Start for Fresh Water Clean Up Fund’. This is about the future every bit as much as the past.

“The $35 million Irrigation Acceleration Fund is a positive step forward to developing water as a resource. That’s because 95 percent of the water used in agriculture does not come from storage and when I use the term agriculture, I include horticulture and the wine industry too.

“Federated Farmers has enthusiastically pushed for a ‘new water’ policy because this is about storing what falls from the sky. Economic studies done on the Opuha Dam during the last Labour Government showed an 8:1 economic payback.

“The $35 million Irrigation Acceleration Fund could well unlock billions of dollars in benefits.

“What’s more, native fish and water fowl can’t prosper in dry river beds. Water also provides recreational and community gains. . . .

Those community gains are environmental, recreational and economic.

Water storage provides opportunities for fishing and water sports, it can enhance waterways to ensure they have a reasonable minimum flow during dry spells and also protect soils from wind erosion.

Storing water for irrigation safe-guards farms during droughts which ensures money keeps flowing through to the people and businesses who work for, supply and service farmers.

We had about 10 mls of rain yesterday, it’s the first significant precipitation since the two winter snow falls. Without irrigation we’d be starting to worry, with reliable water we know we can grow grass whatever the weather.

There is potential for more irrigation here and in other places. The Irrigation Acceleration Fund will help the development of new schemes while the work of the Land and Water Forum will ensure past mistakes are cleaned up and not repeated in the future.


More than Irish eyes smiling

September 18, 2011

The upset win by Ireland over Australia last night will have more than Irish eyes smiling.

Rugby World Tournament organisers will be delighted that the competition, which was warming up anyway, has been well and truly set alight.

Blue and white ruled in Invercargill where Argentina won 43 – 8 against Romania and the Springboks beat Fiji 49 – 3.

The Welsh players will no doubt be thinking of the death of four men after a flood in a coal mine near Swansea on Friday when they meet Samoa this afternoon.

I’m backing Samoa in that game, Canada against France and for what might be the only time in the tournament I’ll be siding with England when the team meets Georgia in Dunedin.

 


Tailing tells tale of snow losses

September 18, 2011

The rare falls of snow in Auckland and Wellington in August captured media attention and rural areas were overlooked.

However, now that tailing (or what they call docking in the North Island) is underway, large lamb losses are being noticed.

They’re not as bad as the devastating number of deaths in Southland last spring but with lamb prices expected to be high again this year the losses will make sizable dents in budgets.


September 18 in history

September 18, 2011

96  Nerva was proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian was assassinated.

324 Constantine the Great decisively defeated Licinius in the Battle of Chrysopolis, establishing Constantine’s sole control over the Roman Empire.

 

1180  Philip Augustus became king of France. 

1454  In the Battle of Chojnice, the Polish army was defeated by the Teutonic army during the Thirteen Years’ War.

1709 Samuel Johnson, English writer and lexicographer, was born (d. 1784).

1739  The Treaty of Belgrade was signed, ceding Belgrade to the Ottoman Empire.

1793  The first cornerstone of the Capitol building was laid by George Washington.

 

1809 The Royal Opera House in London opened. 

1810  First Government Junta in Chile. 

1812  The 1812 Fire of Moscow died down after destroying more than three quarters of the city. Napoleon returned from the Petrovsky Palace to the Moscow Kremlin, which was spared from the fire. 

1837  Tiffany and Co. (first named Tiffany & Young) was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and Teddy Young in New York City. 

1838 The Anti-Corn Law League was established by Richard Cobden. 

1850  The U.S. Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. 

1851  First publication of The New-York Daily Times, which later became The New York Times.

1863  American Civil War: Battle of Chickamauga.

1870  Old Faithful Geyser was observed and named by Henry D. Washburn during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition to Yellowstone.

 

1872 King Oscar II acceded to the throne of Sweden-Norway.

 

1873  The Panic of 1873 began.

1876 James Scullin, 9th Prime Minister of Australia, was born (d. 1953). 

1879 The Blackpool Illuminations were switched on for the first time. 

1882 The Pacific Stock Exchange opened.

1885  Riots broke out in Montreal to protest against compulsory smallpox vaccination.

1889  Doris Blackburn, Australian politician, was born (d. 1970).

 

1895  Booker T. Washington delivered the “Atlanta Compromise” address.

1895  Daniel David Palmer gave the first chiropractic adjustment. 

1895 John Diefenbaker, 13th Prime Minister of Canada, was born (d. 1979). 

1898  Fashoda Incident – Lord Kitchener’s ships reached Fashoda, Sudan. 

1900 Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, 1st Prime Minister of Mauritius, was born (d. 1985).

 1905  Agnes de Mille, American choreographer, was born (d. 1993).

1905  Greta Garbo, Swedish actress, was born(d. 1990) .

1906 A typhoon with tsunami killed an estimated 10,000 people in Hong Kong.

1910  In Amsterdam, 25,000 demonstrated for general suffrage.

1911  Russian Premier Peter Stolypin was shot at the Kiev Opera House.

 

1914 The Irish Home Rule Act became law, but was delayed until after World War I.

1919 The Netherlands gave women the right to vote.

1919 – Fritz Pollard became the first African-American to play professional football for a major team, the Akron Pros.

1923 Queen Anne of Romania was born.

 

1928  Juan de la Cierva made the first autogyro crossing of the English Channel. 

1931 The Mukden Incident gave Japan the pretext to invade and occupy Manchuria.

 

1937 David and Mary McGregor moved in to New Zealand’s first state house.

First state house opened in Miramar

1939 Jorge Sampaio, President of Portugal, was born.

 

1939 World War II: Polish government of Ignacy Mościcki fled to Romania.

 

1939   William Joyce made his first Nazi propaganda broadcast.

1940  World War II: Italian troops conquered Sidi Barrani.

1942  The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was authorized.

 

1943  World War II: The Jews of Minsk were massacred at Sobibór.

1943 – World ar II: Adolf Hitler ordered the deportation of Danish Jews.

1944  World War II: The British submarine HMS Tradewind torpedoed Junyō Maru, 5,600 killed.

 

1948  Communist Madiun uprising in Dutch Indies.

1948 –Margaret Chase Smith of Maine became the first woman elected to the US Senate without completing another senator’s term, when she defeated Democratic opponent Adrian Scolten.

 

1948 – The Donald Bradman-led Australian cricket team completed the unprecedented feat of going through an English summer without defeat. 

1952 Dee Dee Ramone, American bassist (The Ramones), was born (d. 2002).

 

1959 Vanguard 3 was launched into Earth orbit.

1961  U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld died in a plane crash while attempting to negotiate peace in the war-torn Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

1964  Constantine II of Greece married Danish princess Anne-Marie

1971 Lance Armstrong, American cyclist, was born. 

1972  First Ugandans expelled by Idi Amin arrived in the United Kingdom.

1974 Hurricane Fifi struck Honduras with 110 mph winds, killing 5,000 people. 

1975 Patty Hearst was arrested after a year on the FBI Most Wanted List.

 

1976 Mao Zedong‘s funeral in Beijing.

1980 Soyuz 38 carried 2 cosmonauts (including 1 Cuban) to Salyut 6 space station.

 

1981 Assemblée Nationale voted to abolish capital punishment in France.

1982  Christian militia began killing six-hundred Palestinians in Lebanon.

1984  Joe Kittinger completed the first solo balloon crossing of the Atlantic.

 

1988 End of pro-democracy uprisings in Myanmar after a bloody military coup by the State Law and Order Restoration Council. 

1991 Yugoslavia began a naval blockade of 7 Adriatic port cities.

1992  An explosion rocks Giant Mine at the height of a labour dispute, killing 9 replacement workers.

1997  United States media magnate Ted Turner donated $US1 billion to the United Nations.

1997 – Voters in Wales voted yes (50.3%) on a referendum on Welsh autonomy.

1998  ICANN was formed.

 

2001  First mailing of anthrax letters from Trenton, New Jersey in the 2001 anthrax attacks.

 

2006 Right wing protesters riot the building of the Hungarian Television in Budapest. 

2007 Pervez Musharraf announced he would step down as army chief and restore civilian rule to Pakistan, but only after he was re-elected president.

2007 Buddhist monks joined anti-government protesters in Myanmar, starting the Saffron Revolution

2009 The 72 year run of the soap opera The Guiding Light ended as its final episode is broadcast.

 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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