Word of the day

September 2, 2011

 Jaculiferous – bearing prickles or dart-like spines; covered with sharp points.


Friday’s answers

September 2, 2011

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do that by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”?

2. Who is the author who wrote Cut and Run and Slaughter Falls under the pseudonym Alix Bosco?

3. It’s miel in French and Spanish, miele in Italian and honi or miere in Maori, what is it in English?

4. Who was Piglet’s grandfather?

5. Which teams met for the Bronze final in the 2007 Rugby World Cup?

Points for answers:

PDM got a bonus for being so familiar with A.A. Milne.

Andrei won an electrronic chocolate cake with 3 1/2 right and a bonus for extra information.

GD got two with a bonus for preferring Argentina (and a good try for #4).

Cadwallader got a bonus for turning up.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


It’s Aftersocks Day

September 2, 2011

Rural Women NZ have declared today Aftersocks Day.

“Our aftersocks™ have been a huge success since their launch in July, with tens of thousands of dollars raised for the Christchurch Mayoral Fund,” says RWNZ National President, Liz Evans.

On 2 September Rural Women New Zealand is urging all its aftersocks™ customers to pull on a pair and to send in photos of where they get to in their socks.

Rural Women New Zealand members around the country will be hitting the streets selling aftersocks™, making sure everyone around the country has a pair to wear.

Sunday is the first anniversary of the Canterbury earthquake and the earth is still moving.

A 4.9 magnitude shake woke up Christchurch this morning, following  4.0 and 4.8 shakes yesterday.


Rural training good for trainees and communities

September 2, 2011

Health Minister Tony Ryall and Education Minister Anne Tolley have announced a partnership with the Universities of Auckland and Otago that will train more doctors and nurses and other health professionals at Gisborne and Whakatane Hospitals.

The partnership is part of a new $4.5 million programme to train health students in rural areas so that they will return to work in rural communities.

“Over the next three years an estimated 300 plus student doctors, nurses, pharmacists, physiotherapists and dentists will train side by side, in the classroom and out on the job at Whakatane and Gisborne Hospitals” says Mrs Tolley.

Otago started sending students to rural hospitals a few years ago. I think it was an initiative of the late Dr Pat Farry who was passionate about rural medicine.

The idea is that if students train in rural and provincial areas they will be more likely to consider working there once they graduate.

The experience is good for the trainees and the communities where they train which often suffer from an exodus of youth in search of further education.


Spot the link

September 2, 2011

Could there be a link between this:

Biofuels regain momentum:

Global biofuel production increased by 17 percent in 2010 to reach an all-time high of 105 billion liters.1 (See Figure 1.) The increase exceeded the 10 percent growth experienced in 2009, when production was at 90 billion liters.2 Biofuels provided 2.7 percent of all global fuel for road transportation—an increase from 2 percent in 2009.3

And this:

Price of breakfast soars:

The average cost of feeding a family breakfast is 11.7 per cent higher today   than it was one year ago, with the price of some staple items rising by over   40 per cent. Official figures last week put overall inflation in the UK at   4.4 per cent . . .  

The rising prices of basic commodities such as wheat, sugar, coffee and   vegetable oil – which form the basis of many breakfast foods – have been   blamed for the inflation-busting increases.

Tim Worstall thinks so. He says breakfast is getting more expensive and biofuels are to blame:

You’ll note that three of the four are items that are used to make biofuels. . .

The price of eggs is largely determined by the price of corn which is….yes,
another crop that is used to make biofuels. I think I’m right in saying that
some 40% of the entire American crop is currently turned into ethanol.

This is, quite sadly, simply evidence of the quite lunatic idea that we
should be putting food into cars rather than people. The idea itself is bad
enough but we then have the governmental insistence (on both sides of the
Atlantic, the US and the EU) that such fuels must be used. There is no choice in
the matter, we are not allowed to avoid starving people.

An increase in renewable fuels, particularly if they are cleaner burning, is a worthy aim but feeding people is more important than heating and moving them.

Crops for food should always take precedence over crops for fuel.


September 2 in history

September 2, 2011

44 BC  Pharaoh Cleopatra VII of Egypt declared her son co-ruler as Ptolemy XV Caesarion.

44 BC  The first of Cicero’s Philippics (oratorical attacks) on Mark Antony.

31 BC  Final War of the Roman Republic: Battle of Actium – off the western coast of Greece, forces of Octavian defeated troops under Mark Antony and Cleopatra.

1649  The Italian city of Castro was completely destroyed by the forces of Pope Innocent X, ending the Wars of Castro.

1666  The Great Fire of London broke out and burned for three days, destroying 10,000 buildings including St Paul’s Cathedral.

1752  Great Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar, nearly two centuries later than most of Western Europe. 

1789  The United States Department of the Treasury was founded.

 

1792  During what became known as the September Massacres of the French Revolution, rampaging mobs slaughtered three Roman Catholic Church bishops, more than two hundred priests, and prisoners believed to be royalist sympathisers. 

1807  The Royal Navy bombarded Copenhagen with fire bombs and phosphorus rockets to prevent Denmark from surrendering its fleet to Napoleon.

 

1833  Oberlin College was founded by John Shipherd and Philo P. Stewart.

1856  Tianjing Incident in Nanjing, China.

1862  American Civil War:  President Abraham Lincoln reluctantly restored Union General George B. McClellan to full command after General John Pope’s disastrous defeat at the Second Battle of Bull Run.

1867 Mutsuhito, Emperor Meiji of Japan, married Masako Ichijō.  

1870  Franco-Prussian War: Battle of Sedan – Prussian forces took Napoleon III of France and 100,000 of his soldiers prisoner.

1885  Rock Springs massacre:  150  miners, who were struggling to unionize so they could strike for better wages and work conditions, attacked their Chinese fellow workers, killing 28, wounding 15, and forcing several hundred more out of town.

 

1898 Battle of Omdurman – British and Egyptian troops defeat ed Sudanese tribesmen and establish British dominance in Sudan.

1901  Vice President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt uttered the famous phrase, “Speak softly and carry a big stick” at the Minnesota State Fair. 

1925  The U.S. Zeppelin the USS Shenandoah crashed, killing 14. 

1935  Labor Day Hurricane  hit the Florida Keys killing 423.

 

1937 Derek Fowlds, British actor, was born.

 

1945 World War II: Combat ended in the Pacific Theatre: the Instrument of Surrender of Japan was signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. 

1945 Vietnam declared its independence, forming the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.

 

1946  Interim Government of India was formed with Jawaharlal Nehru as Vice President.

1957 President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam became the first foreign head of state to make a state visit to Australia

1958 United States Air Force C-130A-II was shot down by fighters over Yerevan, Armenia when it strayed into Soviet airspace while conducting a sigint mission. All crew members were killed.

1959 Guy Laliberté, founder of Cirque du Soleil, was born.

1960  New Zealand enjoyed perhaps its greatest day ever at an Olympic Games. First Peter Snell won gold in the 800 m, and then within half an hour Murray Halberg won the 5000 m to complete a remarkable track double in Rome’s Olympic Stadium.

Golden day for Kiwi runners in Rome

1960 The first election of the Parliament of the Central Tibetan Administration. The Tibetan community observes this date as Democracy Day.

1967 The Principality of Sealand was established, ruled by Prince Paddy Roy Bates.

1990  Transnistria was unilaterally proclaimed a Soviet republic; the Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev declared the decision null and void.

1992  An earthquake in Nicaragua killed at least 116 people.

1996  A peace agreement was signed between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the Moro National Liberation Front in Malacañang Palace.

1998  Swissair Flight 111 crashed near Peggys Cove, Nova Scotia. All 229 people on board were killed.

 

1998 The UN’s International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda found Jean Paul Akayesu, the former mayor of a small town in Rwanda, guilty of nine counts of genocide.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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