Word of the day

August 4, 2011

Redacted –  edit text for publication; censor or obscure part of a text for legal or security purposes.


Thursday’s quiz

August 4, 2011

1. Who said: “I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond.”?

2. Graphite and diamonds are both composed of what?

3. It’s bijoux in French, gioielliin Italian and  joyas in Spanish, what is it in English?

4. Name one of the two gems varieties of the mineral corundum.?

5. What percentage of silver is in sterling silver?


Slow post go telegrams return

August 4, 2011

New Zealand Post has announced the end international surface mail, saying three weeks is too long for the internet generation.

But the internet has facilitated the rebirth of telegrams.

Run by Madewell Enterprises, telegramstop.com enables you to compose a telegram online. They’ll then email you a copy and post the original to the recipient.

This might lead to a renaissance for wedding telegrams. We still have ours – the real ones and the odd joke one our best man slipped in.

They were replaced by faxes then emails and texts, but Telegram Stop’s product would make the message much more of a keep-sake than any of those.

The Sydney Morning Herald has more on the company which was founded by former MYOB owner Craig Winkler.


Another wee party dreaming

August 4, 2011

How conservative am I? The answer I got after completely the newly launched Conservative Party questionnaire was not enough for them to want me.

I agreed with a few of the propositions, disagreed with more and like  Zen Tiger  and Lindsay Mitchell I found some difficult to answer. They were either too black and white to fit my views or multi-pronged.

But I won’t bother taking a further look.

A party needs a lot more than a big ego a a few hot-button ideas to succeed.

It has to get at least 500 members and a constitution before it can be registered and then it has to do a lot of work to persuade voters to support it.

Results from the last election show just how difficult it is for the really wee parties: 

Total Votes Counted:

2,356,536*
Party

Party
Votes

%
Votes

Electorate
Seats

List
Seats

Total
Seats

National Party
1,053,398
44.93
41
17
58
Labour Party
796,880
33.99
21
22
43
Green Party
157,613
6.72
0
9
9
ACT New Zealand
85,496
3.65
1
4
5
Māori Party
55,980
2.39
5
0
5

Jim Anderton’s Progressive

21,241
0.91
1
0
1
United Future
20,497
0.87
1
0
1
New Zealand First Party
95,356
4.07
0
0
0

The Bill and Ben Party

13,016
0.56
0
0
0
Kiwi Party
12,755
0.54
0
0
0

Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party

9,515
0.41
0
0
0
New Zealand Pacific Party
8,640
0.37
0
0
0
Family Party
8,176
0.35
0
0
0
Alliance
1,909
0.08
0
0
0

Democrats for Social Credit

1,208
0.05
0
0
0
Libertarianz
1,176
0.05
0
0
0
Workers Party
932
0.04
0
0
0

RAM – Residents Action Movement

465
0.02
0
0
0
The Republic of New Zealand Party
313
0.01
0
0
0
 
70
52
122

If you find you’re conservative enough for the party to want you (a score of 10 or more in the quiz) it would pay to look around for another party with views which match yours and has a better chance of getting into parliament.


Someone might miss out on TV debate

August 4, 2011

Prime Minister John Key and Opposition leader Phil Goff have sensibly agreed that they will debate each other on television but not take part in the circus which will be the minor-party leaders’ debates.

However, the ODT (not online) reports another aspect to this story:

. . . a  multiparty debate would be open to party leaders represented in Parliament, a TVNZ spokeswoman said party leaders not represented in parliament were required to reach a 3% threshold in at least one of the network’s two Colmar Brunton Polls.

The most recent CB poll results were:

National is up to 53% while Labour sheds seven points to 27%. The Greens take some of that vote, bouncing up to 10%, while Act and the Maori Party are both sitting around 3%.

New Zealand First (2.4%) would need to double its support to make it back, and the Mana Party (0.5%) and United Future (0.3%) are barely registering.

Last time I counted 2.4% was under 3%.

But I wouldn’t rule out its leader using this to his advantage, it wouldn’t be the first time he’s pulled the lone warrior against the establishment card.


August 4 in history

August 4, 2011

On August 4:

1265 Second Barons’ War: Battle of Evesham – the army of Prince Edward defeated the forces of rebellious barons led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, killing de Montfort and many of his allies.

1532 the Duchy of Brittany was annexed to the Kingdom of France.

1578 Battle of Al Kasr al Kebir – the Moroccans defeaed the Portuguese. King Sebastian of Portugal was killed leaving his elderly uncle, Cardinal Henry, as his heir which initiated a succession crisis in Portugal.

1693 Date traditionally ascribed to Dom Perignon’s invention of Champagne

1704  War of the Spanish Succession: Gibraltar was captured by an English and Dutch fleet, commanded by Admiral Sir George Rooke and allied with Archduke Charles.

1789 In France members of the National Constituent Assembly tookan oath to end feudalism and abandon their privileges.

1790 A newly passed tariff act created the Revenue Cutter Service (the forerunner of the United States Coast Guard).

1791 The Treaty of Sistova was signed, ending the Ottoman-Habsburg wars.

1792 Percy Bysshe Shelley, English poet, was born (d. 1822).

1821  Atkinson & Alexander published the Saturday Evening Post for the first time.

 1821 Louis Vuitton, French designer, was born (d. 1892).

 

1824 Battle of Kos  between Turks and Greeks.

1834  John Venn, English mathematician, was born (d. 1923).

1854 The Hinomaru was established as the official flag to be flown from Japanese ships.

1870 Sir Harry Lauder, Scottish entertainer, was born (d. 1950).

1873  The United States 7th Cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, clashed for the first time with the Sioux, one man on each side was killed.

1900 Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, (Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother), was born (d. 2002) 

1901 Louis Armstrong, American jazz musician, was born (d. 1971).

A picture of Louis Armstrong. Short-haired black man in his fifties blowing into a trumpet. He is wearing a light-colored sport coat, a white shirt and a bow tie. He is faced left with his eyes looking upwards. His right hand is fingering the trumpet, with the index finger down and three fingers pointing upwards. The man's left hand is mostly covered with a handkerchief and it has a shining ring on the little finger. He is wearing a wristwatch on the left wrist.

1902 The Greenwich foot tunnel under the River Thames opened.

1906  Central Railway Station, Sydney opened.

1914   Germany invaded Belgium. In response, the United Kingdom declared war on Germany. The United States declares its neutrality.

1916  Liberia declared war on Germany.

1936  Prime Minister of Greece Ioannis Metaxas suspended parliament and the Constitution and established the 4th of August Regime.

1942 David Lange,   former New Zealand Prime Minister, was born (d. 2005).

1943 Vicente Alberto Álvarez Areces, President of the Government of the Principality of Asturias in Spain, was born.

1944 A tip from a Dutch informer led the Gestapo to a sealed-off area in an Amsterdam warehouse where they foundd  Anne Frank and her family.

1946 Dominican Republic earthquake of magnitude 8.0;  100  killed and 20,000 left homeless.

1947 The Supreme Court of Japan was established.

1952 Moya Brennan, Irish singer, was born.

1954  The Government of Pakistan approved Qaumi Tarana, written by Hafeez Jullundhry and composed by Ahmed G. Chagla, as the national anthem.

1958  The Billboard Hot 100 was founded.

 1960 – Tim Winton, Australian author, was born. 

1960 Paul Henry,  New Zealand broadcaster, was born.

1960 José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, Prime Minister of Spain, was born.

1961  Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, was born.

A young boy possibly in his early teens, a younger girl (about age 5), a grown woman and an elderly man, sit on a lawn wearing contemporary circa-1970 attire. The adults wear sunglasses and the boy wears sandals. 

1964  Civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney were found dead after disappearing on June 21.

1964  Gulf of Tonkin Incident: United States destroyers USS Maddox and USS Turner Joy reported coming under attack in the Gulf of Tonkin.

1965  The Cook Islands gained Self Government.

Cook Islands achieve self-government

1965 Fredrik Reinfeldt, Prime Minister of Sweden, was born.

1969  Vietnam War: at the apartment of French intermediary Jean Sainteny in Paris, U.S. representative Henry Kissinger and North Vietnamese representative Xuan Thuy began secret peace negotiations.

1974  A bomb exploded in the Italicus Express train at San Benedetto Val di Sambro, Italy, killing 12 people and wounding 22.

1975  The Japanese Red Army took more than 50 hostages at the AIA Building housing several embassies in Kuala Lumpur.

1984  The African republic Upper Volta changed its name to Burkina Faso.

1987 The Federal Communications Commission rescinded the Fairness Doctrine which had required radio and television stations to present controversial issues “fairly”.

1991  The Greek cruise ship MTS Oceanos sank off the Wild Coast of South Africa.

1995 Operation Storm began in Croatia.

2002 Soham murders: 10 year old school girls Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells went missing from Soham, Cambridgeshire.

2005 Prime Minister Paul Martin announced that Michaëlle Jean would be Canada’s 27th — and first black — Governor General.

2006 2006 Trincomalee massacre of NGO workers by Sri Lankan government forces, killing 17 employees of the French INGO Action Against Hunger (known internationally as Action Contre la Faim, or ACF).

2007 NASA’s Phoenix spaceship was launched.

2007 – Airport police officer María del Luján Telpuk discovered a suitcase containing an undeclared amount of US$800,000 as it went through an x-ray machine in Buenos Aires’ Aeroparque Jorge Newbery, sparking an international scandal involving Venezuela and Argentina known as “Maletinazo“.

2010 – California’s Proposition 8, the ballot initiative prohibiting same-sex marriage passed by the state’s voters in 2008, was overturned by Judge Vaughn Walker in the case Perry v. Schwarzenegger.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia

If you want history with pictures click here.


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