Word of the day

July 7, 2011

Babag – argument or fight; barrier, blockade,  hazard, obstruction; thwart.


Discipline is . . .

July 7, 2011

. . . having the self-restraint to suck a lozenge or sweet until it dissolves rather than hastening the process by chewing or biting.


Thursday’s quiz

July 7, 2011

1.  Which novel opens:  “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” and who is the author?.

2. Who said: “Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess “?

3. What are malbec  and tempranillo?

4. In which ocean is Madagascar?

5. It’s feu in French,fuoco in Italian,  feugo fuego in Spanish and ahi  in Maori, what is it in English?


Milk price down again

July 7, 2011

The trade weighted index price dropped 6.7% at Fonterra’s golobalDairy Trade auction yesterday.

Whole milk powder was down 6.8% to $3,638/MT; skim milk powder was down 7.2% to $3,704/MT; anhydrous milk fat fell 1.4% to $5,278/MT;  rennet casein went up 1% to $10,161/MT and milk protein concentrate dropped 3.6% to $6,174/MT.

Prices are still above the long term average and about 3% higher than at this time last year.


Australia repopens live cattle trade to Indonesia

July 7, 2011

Australian Agriculture Minister Joe Ludwig  has reopened live cattle trade to Indonesia on condition exporters are responsible for the welfare of stock sent for slaughter. 

Although there have been no inspections of Indonesian abattoirs by Australian officials, Senator Ludwig said export permits would be issued only if exporters complied with a new system that ensured individual cattle were tracked and slaughtered under international standards.

The ban, which was imposed after evidence emerged of Australian cattle being treated brutally in Indonesian abattoirs, has devastated the $320 million a year industry and sparked tension with Australia’s nearest neighbour. Senator Ludwig’s decision means Australian exporters can now apply for export licences to start shipping stranded cattle to Indonesia if they meet strict conditions to track animal movements to ensure their humane treatment.

Cattle producers in the Northern Territory and northern Western Australia have few other options for selling prime stock.

When we were there last year, Indonesia had changed the rules, reducing the weight of cattle which could be imported and that was putting huge pressure on station budgets.

The change was made because Indonesia wanted to increase domestic production to reduce its reliance on imports. The ban has added impetus to that:

The Indonesian government described the scrapping of the ban as ”great news”.

Deputy agriculture minister Bayu Krisnamurthi said Jakarta is now rethinking its reliance on live cattle imports in the wake of the ban.

He said Indonesia’s recent experiences with Australia show that depending on food imports is risky.

The ban cost Australia 10s of millions of dollars. If Indonesia does manage to increase its self-sufficiency it will have a major impact on Australia and northern cattle producers in particular.

 

 


Governments in waiting need to broaden appeal

July 7, 2011

Political parties in opposition need to consolidate their voting base then broaden their appeal.

Labour’s policy announcements so far will probably work for its core constituency but they’re not likely to help it appeal to to many floating voters.

Its latest, which was leaked rather than announced, is for a capital gains tax . That will gladden the hearts of its die-hard supporters and might staunch the bleeding of some votes to the Greens, Mana and New Zealand First.

But it’s not likely to appeal to floating voters towards the centre and further right if they have any aspiration or understand the implications.

Simple taxes are better taxes.

Labour’s planned CGT appears to be complex with exemptions which opens the way for avoidance and could take 15 years to take affect.

That looks more like the policy of a party appealing to its own and destined for at least another term in opposition rather than a government in waiting attempting to broaden its appeal.


July 7 in history

July 7, 2011

1456 A retrial verdict acquitted  Joan of Arc of heresy 25 years after her death.

 

1534 European colonization of the Americas: first known exchange between Europeans and natives of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, in New Brunswick.

1543  French troops invaded Luxembourg.

1575  Raid of the Redeswire, the last major battle between England and Scotland.

1585  Treaty of Nemours abolishesdtolerance to Protestants in France.

1770 The Battle of Larga.

1777 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Hubbardton.

1777BurgoyneTiconderoga.jpg

1798 Quasi-War: the U.S. Congress rescinded treaties with France sparking the “war”.

USS Constellation

1799  Ranjit Singh‘s men took up their positions outside Lahore.

 
Ranjitsingh.gif

1807 Napoleonic Wars: Peace of Tilsit between France, Prussia and Russia ended the Fourth Coalition.

 

1846 Mexican-American War: American troops occupied Monterey and Yerba Buena (now San Francisco), beginning the United States conquest of California.

1851 Charles Tindley, American gospel music composer, was born (d. 1933).

1860 Gustav Mahler, Austrian composer, was born  (d. 1911).

 Middle-aged man, seated, facing towards the left but head turned towards the right. He has a high forehead, rimless glasses and is wearing a dark, crumpled suit 

1863  United States began first military draft; exemptions cost $300.

1892 Katipunan: the Revolutionary Philippine Brotherhood was established leading to the fall of the Spanish Empire in Asia.

1898  President William McKinley signed the Newlands Resolution annexing Hawaii as a territory of the United States.

 

1915 Margaret Abigail Walker Alexander, African-American novelist and poet, was born (d. 1998).

1915 World War I: end of First Battle of the Isonzo.

Italian Front 1915-1917.jpg

1916 The NZ Labour Party was founded.

NZ Labour Party founded

1915  An International Railway (New York – Ontario) trolley with an extreme overload of 157 passengers crashed near Queenston, Ontario, killing 15.

1917  Russian Revolution: Prince Georgy Yevgenyevich Lvov formed a Provisional Government in Russia after the deposing of the Tsar Nicholas II.

 

1919 Jon Pertwee, English actor, was born (d. 1996).

1922  Pierre Cardin, French fashion designer, was born.

1924 Arthur Porritt won a bronze medal for New Zealand in the 100 m at the Olympic Games (portrayed as Tom Watson in the film Chariots of Fire).

'Tom Watson' wins bronze for New Zealand

1924 Mary Ford, American singer, was born (d. 1977).

 

1927 Doc Severinsen, American composer and musician, was born.

1928  Sliced bread was sold for the first time by the Chillicothe Baking Company of Chillicothe, Missouri. It was described as “the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped”.

 

1930  Industrialist Henry J. Kaiser began construction of the Boulder Dam (now known as Hoover Dam).

1933 Sir Murray Halberg, New Zealand runner, was born.

1937 Sino-Japanese War: Battle of Lugou Bridge – Japanese forces invaded Beijing.

 
The National Revolutionary Army troops defending the Marco Polo Bridge, 1937

1940 Ringo Starr, English drummer and singer (The Beatles), was born.

1941  Bill Oddie, English comedian and ornithologist, was born.

 
TheGoodies.jpg

1941 World War II: U.S. forces landed in Iceland to forestall an invasion by Germany.

1941  World War II: Beirut was occupied by Free France and British troops.

1942 Carmen Duncan, Australian actress, was born.

1946  Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini became the first American to be canonized.

1946   Howard Hughes nearly died when his XF-11 spy plane prototype crashed.

1947 Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev, King of Nepal, was born.

1947 Alleged and disputed Roswell UFO incident.

 

1953 Che Guevara set out on a trip through Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador.

1956 Fritz Moravec reached the peak of Gasherbrum II (8,035 m).

1958 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Act into United States law.

 

1959  Venus occultes the star Regulus. This rare event is used to determine the diameter of Venus and the structure of the Venusian atmosphere.

1967 Beginning of the civil war in Biafra.

Biafra independent state map-en.svg

1969  In Canada, the Official Languages Act was adopted making French equal to English throughout the Federal government.

1974 West Germany won the FIFA World Cup, beating Netherlands 2-1 in the Final.

Fifa world cup org.jpg

1978 The Solomon Islands became independent from the United Kingdom.

1980  Institution of sharia in Iran.

1980 The Safra massacre in Lebanon.

1983 Cold War: Samantha Smith, a U.S.  schoolgirl, flew to the Soviet Union at the invitation of Secretary General Yuri Andropov.

1991  Yugoslav Wars: the Brioni Agreement ended the ten-day independence war in Slovenia against the rest of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

 
Jna t-55 slovenia.jpg

2002 News reports accused MI6 of sheltering Abu Qatada, the supposed European Al Qaeda leader.

2005  A series of four explosions occurs on London’s transport system killing 56 people, including four alleged suicide bombers and injuring over 700 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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