Will Grayling Young Farmer of Year

03/07/2011

Will Grayling is the 2011 Young Farmer of the Year.

Twenty five year old Will from the Pendarves Club was representing the Aorangi Region. He’s a manager on a 1600 cow dairy farm in Ashburton and is due to marry Kim in December this year. He has a Masters of Applied Science from Lincoln University and was a first time Contestant at Grand Final level.

It didn’t look like it was going to be Will’s night earlier on and even he was worried that the title could be out of his grasp after he made some mistakes in the early question buzzer rounds.

“I thought it was slipping away several times – I got off to a rough start.”

In the end though, his all-round performance secured him the win; he took out the AGMARDT Agri-business Challenge after delivering a presentation on the supply of colostrum earlier in the week. He received an AGMARDT Scholarship towards a career development programme valued at $15,000. He also won the Lincoln University Agri-growth Challenge, taking away a Lincoln University conference package for an industry related conference – domestically or internationally to the value of $8,000. It was a tight race though; Will won the Challenge by only .2 of a mark over Tim van de Molen.

Will also won a $62,000 Grand Final prize package that includes 12 month’s complimentary use of an Isuzu D-Max valued at approximately $15,000, a Honda TRX420FPM power steer four-wheel drive manual ATV $ valued at 15,000, $10,000 cash from The National Bank, quality products and services from Ravensdown to the value of $7,000, a selection of quality outdoor power equipment from ECHO to the value of $7,000, a Lincoln University scholarship for study towards a Specialist Masters of Professional Studies or entry to the Kellogg Programme valued at $5,000, an AGMARDT Scholarship towards a career development programme valued at $2,000 and a range of Swanndri clothing to the value of $1,000.Isuzu Agri-Sports winner – 12 month’s complimentary use of a Isuzu D-Max valued at $15,000.

RivettingKateTaylor has update #3 on the contest and update #4 with photos of the winner..

When my farmer was runner up in the 10th contest he won a Honda 90 motorbike. The winner, Steve Ryan who very sadly died about 10 years later, got a tractor and a trip round the world.

In those days, when there were fewer alternative social and leadership opportunites for rural youth, Young Farmers had about 7,000 members.

Membership dropped to about 1,500 a few years ago but that was its nadir. It has turned around and is increasing again.


Word of the day

03/07/2011

Zatetic – pondering, questioning.


6/10

03/07/2011

6/10 in the NZ Herald news quiz.

I’m not sure exactly where Southland becomes Otago but I am sure the question asking which of four towns isn’t in Southland had two in Otago.


Too little support for Little?

03/07/2011

Understatement of the week from Trans Tasman:

It would be a serious blow to Little’s ambitions if he had to rely on a list placing to get him into Parliament.

It’s referring to a poll in which Jonathan Young gained 41% and Labour’s recently ex-president gained only 25%.

However, David Farrar sees some light for Little:

His 25.3 per cent on the electorate vote is more rosy if you accept Labour’s party vote figure of 16.5 per cent. That is saying that for every 10 Labour party voter, Little is picking up 15 votes. And by contrast Jonathan Young is picking up nine votes for every 10 National Party voters.

Now if the party vote turned out to be the same as in 2008, then applying the above ratios would have Young on 46 per cent and Little on 48 per cent.

This is not to say that this poll shows Little ahead of Young. It does not. But it does show that he is attracting more electorate votes than his party, and that if Labour lifts its party vote, then the seat would be closer than this poll suggests at first glance.

Little has a reasonably safe place on the Labour list but that would be seen as a second best option.

All MPs are supposed to be equal but in the eyes of many electorate MPs are more equal than those who enter parliament on the party list.


Celebrating winners counters tall poppy syndrome

03/07/2011

Fonterra CEO Andrew Ferrier is Federated Farmers Agribusiness Person of the Year.

This is fair recognition of the work he has done in the nearly eight years he’s led the company.

Agri-Personality of the Year  was awarded to John Hartnell and the Farmy Army.

John Hartnell was nominated to recognise his leadership of the ‘Farmy-Army’, which assisted Christchurch’s earthquake recovery from February of this year and again in June.

John was prepared to lead the Federation’s efforts to help the people of urban Christchurch in the recovery phase of the earthquake’s aftermath. In taking on the role as Federated Farmers Earthquake Spokesperson the morning after the earthquake, John worked closely with Civil Defence to understand the immediate needs of Christchurch residents and to identify assistance that would fit with the abilities and enthusiasm of our farmer members.

Over the next two days, John worked closely with a core group of Federated Farmers members to assemble a volunteer group and a base at the A+P Showgrounds. This included a team of support staff, team leaders and cooks. Sponsors were very keen to help in tangible ways, including cash donations, equipment, food and drinks.

The media were inspired by the actions of Federated Farmers and thus, the ‘Farmy Army’ was born.

We all know the efforts and achievements in the four weeks of help given to Christchurch and now, a further week jointly with the Student Volunteer Army.

What has amazed many, are the number of Christchurch people who, upon learning you are a farmer, very quickly and without prompting say, “are you part of the Farmy Army? What a magnificent job”, or “they arrived an cleared my elderly neighbour’s section” and “they cleaned up my driveway when I was away working”, “They were a Godsend”

The actions of the Farmy Army did a tremendous job in breaking down the rural-urban divide with compassion and caring shown by country people; something not so often seen in big cities today.

Most certainly John was assisted by a large team, but his leadership, inspiration and dedication to that team was a pivotal part of the success of the Farmy Army. John’s trademark “hand on the shoulder” is his most genuine was of saying “Thanks, your help is most appreciated”.

Mr Hartnell played tribute in his acceptance to Murray Rowlands, North Canterbury Grain & Seed chairperson, for his leadership during last year’s Canterbury earthquake. Overall, John Hartnell, Commander in Chief of the Farmy Army, is a deserved winner of the 2011 Agri-Personality of the Year on behalf of everyone who volunteered in the Farmy Army.

 Federated Farmers Cream of the Crop awards recognise those who have won various national awards over the past twelve months went to:

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Sharemilker / Equity Farmers of the Year – Jason & Lisa Suisted

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Sharemilker / Equity Farmers of the Year Federated Farmers Leadership Award – Richard and Joanna Greaves

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Farm Manager of the Year -Jason Halford

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Dairy Trainee of the Year – Ben Smith

Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Women Supreme Awards – Lisa Harper

Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award – Waipapa 9 Trust (Dawson Haa, Chairman)

NZ Young Farmers National Bank Young Farmer of the Year 2010 – Grant McNaughton

New Zealand Farm Environment Award Trust Ballance Farm Environment Award – Grant and Bernadette Weller.

One way to counter the tall poppy syndrome  is to celebrate winners and this initiative by Federated Farmers does that well.


Too much taking offence offends

03/07/2011

Talking point from Trans Tasman:

Time was (and we’re old enough to remember it) if a journalist heard the word “problem,” they’d know they had a story. One of the biggest shifts in journalism in the last 20-odd years is the word problem has been replaced. Now, the word is “offended.”

We now have a generation of journalists who believe as soon as they have someone saying they are offended by something someone else said – or wrote on the Internet – they have a story.

People say and do things at which many people take offence often but too often  the substance of the issue being discussed is swamped by stories on people taking offence.

Alasdair Thompson’s comments on women’s sick problems and Damien O’Connor’s gaggle of gays and unionists are recent examples of this.

This is unhealthy, for a number of reasons.

In a free society with freedom of expression, you are going to hear things you don’t agree with. People are going to say things which might even upset you. But turning the “offence” into the issue encourages two things, neither of them very wholesome.

One is a certain degree of adolescent, emotive self-dramatisation. Much more damaging is it discourages people from expressing views which might run counter to the group-think.

In a small society like NZ’s there is already a tendency, in a tussle between honesty and excessive politeness, for excessive politeness to win.

By rights, the media should try, quite consciously, to lean against this tendency. Instead, it seems to be aiding and abetting it. Not a healthy development.

Emotion often makes better headlines than facts but it’s lazy journalism to concentrate on the offended rather than the issue.


July 3 in history

03/07/2011

324  Battle of Adrianople Constantine I defeated Licinius.

Constantine-cameo.jpgConstantine I crowned as a victorious general.

987 Hugh Capet was crowned King of France, the first of the Capetian dynasty.

 

1608  Québec City was founded by Samuel de Champlain.

1728 Robert Adam, Scottish architect, was born (d. 1792).

 
Robert-adam.jpg

1754  French and Indian War: George Washington surrendered Fort Necessity to French forces.

1767  Pitcairn Island was discovered by Midshipman Robert Pitcairn on an expeditionary voyage commanded by Philip Carteret.

1767  Norway’s oldest newspaper still in print, Adresseavisen, was founded and the first edition published.

1775 American Revolutionary War: George Washington took command of the Continental Army.

1778 American Revolutionary War: British forces massacred 360 people in the Wyoming Valley massacre.

 
ChappelWyomingMassacre.jpg

1819 The Bank of Savings in New York City, the first savings bank in the United States, opened.

1839  The first state normal school in the United States, the forerunner to today’s Framingham State College, opened in Lexington, Massachusetts with 3 students.

1844 The last pair of Great Auks was killed.

 
A large, stuffed bird with a black back, white belly, heavy bill, and white eye patch stands, amongst display cases and an orange wall.

1848  Slaves were freed in the Danish West Indies (now U.S. Virgin Islands) by Peter von Scholten in the culmination of a year-long plot by enslaved Africans.

 

1849  The French entered Rome to restore Pope Pius IX to power.

Pope-pius-ix-02.jpg

1852  Congress established the United States’ 2nd mint in San Francisco, California.

1863  U.S. Civil War: The final day of the Battle of Gettysburg culminated with Pickett’s Charge.

 

1866  Austro-Prussian War was decided at the Battle of Königgratz, resulting in Prussia taking over as the prominent German nation from Austria.

Battle of Koniggratz by Georg Bleibtreu.jpg

1884  Dow Jones and Company publishes its first stock average.

Dow Jones & Company logo

1886  Karl Benz  officially unveiled the Benz Patent Motorwagen – the first purpose-built automobile.

1885Benz.jpg

1886  The New York Tribune became the first newspaper to use a linotype machine, eliminating typesetting by hand.

1898  Spanish-American War: The Spanish fleet, led by Pascual Cervera y Topete, was destroyed by the U.S. Navy in Santiago, Cuba.

 

1913  Confederate veterans at the Great Reunion of 1913 reenacted Pickett’s Charge; upon reaching the high-water mark of the Confederacy they were met by the outstretched hands of friendship from Union survivors.

 

1937 Tom Stoppard, Czech-born, British playwright, was born.

 

1938  World speed record for a steam railway locomotive was set in England, by the Mallard, which reaches a speed of 126 miles per hour (203 km/h).

 

1938  President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Eternal Light Peace Memorial and lights the eternal flame at Gettysburg Battlefield.

 

1940  World War II: the French fleet of the Atlantic was bombarded by the British fleet, coming from Gibraltar, causing the loss of three battleships: Dunkerque, Provence and Bretagne, and death of 1200 sailors.

1944 World War II: Minsk was liberated from Nazi control by Soviet troops during Operation Bagration.

1947 Dave Barry, American humorist and author, was born.

 

 1950 – Ewen Chatfield, New Zealand cricketer, was born.

 1951  Richard Hadlee, New Zealand cricketer

1952  Puerto Rico’s Constitution was approved by the Congress of the United States.

1952  The SS United States set sail on her maiden voyage to Southampton. During the voyage, the ship took the Blue Riband away from the RMS Queen Mary.

 

1959 Julie Burchill, British journalist and author, was born.

1960 Vince Clarke, British songwriter (Depeche Mode, Yazoo, and Erasure), was born.

1962  Tom Cruise, American actor, was born.

 

1962  The Algerian War of Independence against the French ended.

Semaine Barricades Alger 1960.jpg

1963 In New Zealand’s worst internal civil aviation accident, all 23 passengers and crew were killed when a DC3 crashed in the Kaimai Range. Helicopters were used for the first time in the search and rescue operation that followed.

DC-3 crashes in Kaimai Range

1964 Joanne Harris, British author, was born.

1969  The biggest explosion in the history of rocketry occurred when the Soviet N1 rocket exploded and destroyed its launchpad.

1970 The Troubles: the “Falls Curfew” began in Belfast.

1970  A British Dan-Air De Havilland Comet chartered jetliner crashed into mountains north of Barcelona killing 113 people.

1977 The Senegalese Republican Movement was founded.

1979  US President Jimmy Carter signed the first directive for secret aid to the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul.

1986  US President Ronald Reagan presided over the relighting of the renovated Statue of Liberty.

1988  United States Navy warship USS Vincennes shot down Iran Air Flight 655 killing all 290 people aboard.

1988 Winston Reid,   New Zealand– Danish Football Player, was born.

1988  The Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge in Istanbul, Turkey was completed, providing the second connection between the continents of Europe and Asia over the Bosporus.

 

1994 The deadliest day in Texas traffic history when 46 people were killed in crashes.

1996 Stone of Scone was returned to Scotland.

 

2001 A Vladivostok Avia Tupolev TU-154 jetliner crashed on approach to landing at Irkutsk, Russia killing 145 people.

2004  Official opening of Bangkok’s subway system.

2005  Same-sex marriage was legalised in Spain.

2006 Valencia metro accident left 43 dead.

2006  Asteroid 2004 XP14 flew within 432,308 kilometres (268,624 mi) of Earth.

 

2009  Mark II.5 Skytrain cars entered service in Metro Vancouver.

Skytrain Mark II-300.jpg
 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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