Word of the day

June 21, 2011

Rantipole  – a wild rambunctious young man; roving; rakish.


And in our spare time we . . .

June 21, 2011

Men and women work similar hours but men get paid for more of what they do.

That’s the unsurprising finding in Statistics New Zealand’s time use survey.

Data collected from two-day time use diaries showed how much time people spent sleeping, on childcare, working, watching television or video, eating, socialising, and on sports and hobbies. 

“This time use survey provides information to help assess New Zealanders’ standard of living. It adds to knowledge from other survey types, such as economic change indicators, to provide a wider view of our country’s progress and the well-being of its people,” Social and Population statistician Paul Brown said.

Men and women spent 6 hours and 44 minutes each day in 2009/10 on paid and unpaid work activities (productive activities). Productive activity includes work for pay (and commuting to work) as well as household work, child care, purchasing goods and services, and other unpaid work.

“However, while 63 percent of men’s work was paid, 65 percent of women’s work was unpaid,” Mr. Brown said. Women spent 4 hours and 20 minutes daily doing unpaid work in 2009/10, less than their 4 hours and 36 minutes in 1998/99, in the first time use survey. Mr Brown said spending 13 minutes less on household work was a key factor. Men spent 2 hours and 32 minutes a day on unpaid productive activity in 2009/10.

I wonder if doing less household work indicates increased efficiency, more sharing of duties with men or just lower standards?

“The only unpaid work activities where men spent more time than women were home maintenance and grounds maintenance.”

People aged 65 and over spent the most time on unpaid work, at 4 hours and 31 minutes a day. People aged 12 to 24 years spent 1 hour and 46 minutes on unpaid work activities, the lowest of all age groups.

Can we take heart from the acknowledgement that a lot of the unpaid work we do is regarded as productive?

I suspect that not too long ago it wouldn’t have been seen as such.


Aftersocks for aftershocks

June 21, 2011

Warming hearts, warming toes, warming Cantabrians – that’s the idea behind aftersocks.

It’s a fundraising venture for Canterbury earthquake relief which was thought up by Justine and Jo Ottey. They went to Rural Women NZ who enlisted the help of Ashburton company NZ Socks.

The result is red and black merino blend socks with a fault-line pattern  selling for $20 a pair with all proceeds going to the Mayoral Relief Fund.

The socks will be officially launched on Thrusday  by Wellington Mayor of Wellington, Celia Wade Brown then at parliament by Jackie Blue MP.

You can read more on Facebook.


Waiting for the white stuff

June 21, 2011

Today is the winter solstice with the sun reaching its northern-most point this evening.

It’s not unusal to get the worst of winter after the mid-point but we’ve only had a couple of frosts so far this month.

Normally I’d hesitate before driving through the LIndis Pass late in the evening in mid-June but on Friday the temeperature didn’t get below 3 degrees and there was no danger of frost or ice.

South Island tourism has taken a hit from the Canterbury earthquakes and the slow start to winter is making life more difficult.

Wanaka was cold, overcast and there was a half-hearted attempt to rain on Saturday morning but there no sign of snow.

The town is usually quieter from after Easter until early June then it gets busier again when skiers and ski field staff arrive. It was still very quiet at the weekend.

It’s no better over the hill in Queenstown and the ODT reports closed ski fields have left 540 people without work.

The Winter Festival opens on Friday. Celebrations will go ahead snow or no snow but organisers will be regard bad weather as good weather as everyone waits for the white stuff.


Homes cost less, food costs more

June 21, 2011

A fall in house prices, record low mortgage interest rates and slow increases in wages and salaries slowly are making homes more affordable.

The Roost Home Loan affordability report for May showed that home loan affordability was at its best since April 2004.

The report calculates how much of a single median take-home income is required to service an 80% mortgage on a median-valued home.

Roost considers a mortgage unaffordable if servicing it requires 40% or more of one person’s median weekly take-home wage.

Queenstown was the least affordable place in the country with an affordability index of  79.3%. However, that’s still a lot better than it’s been:

Servicing a mortgage in Queenstown has become significantly more affordable in recent years, the report showed. A year ago it would have taken 111% of the median wage, with 120.1% required five years ago. The index reached its highest point of 154.3% in December 2005.

The most affordable place to own a home was Southland with an index of 28%.

While house prices and mortgage rates have declined, the price of food has been increasing. That is putting pressure on family budgets but it’s not a bad thing when we export so much of what we produce.

No-one likes paying more for food. But a reduction in interest rates leaves most people with more disposable income and therefore better able to cope with higher grocery prices and higher food prices mean better export returns.

That’s much better for the economy showing unsustainable consumption fuelled by taxing and borrowing is changing to savings, investment and export-led growth.


June 21 in history

June 21, 2011

524  Godomar, King of the Burgundians defeated the Franks at the Battle of Vézeronce.

1307  Külüg Khan enthroned as Khagan of the Mongols and Wuzong of the Yuan.

 
YuanEmperorAlbumQaishanKulugPortrait.jpg

1528 Maria of Spain, Holy Roman Empire Empress, was born (d. 1603).

1582  The Incident at Honnō-ji  in Kyoto.

Honnoj.jpg

1621  Execution of 27 Czech noblemen on the Old Town Square in Prague as a consequence of the Battle of White Mountain.

 

1732 Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach, German composer, was born  (d. 1791).

1734  In Montreal, a slave known by the French name of Marie-Joseph Angélique was put to death, having been convicted of the arson that destroyed much of the city.

1749  Halifax, Nova Scotia, was founded.

1768   James Otis, Jr. offended the King and parliament in a speech to the Massachusetts General Court.

1788   New Hampshire ratified the Constitution of the United States and is admitted as the 9th state in the United States.

1791 Robert Napier, British engineer, was born  (d. 1876).

 

1798   Irish Rebellion of 1798: The British Army defeated Irish rebels at the Battle of Vinegar Hill.

Vinhill.gif

1813   Peninsular War: Battle of Vitoria.

Vitoria - Monumento Batalla Vitoria1.JPG

1824   Greek War of Independence: Egyptian forces captured Psara in the Aegean Sea.

1826   Maniots defeated Egyptians under Ibrahim Pasha in the Battle of Vergas.

IbrahimBaja.jpg

1854  First Victoria Cross won during bombardment of Bomarsund in the Aland Islands.

A bronze cross pattée bearing the crown of Saint Edward surmounted by a lion with the inscription FOR VALOUR. A crimson ribbon is attached

1864   New Zealand Land Wars: The Tauranga Campaign ended.

1877   The Molly Maguires, ten Irish immigrants, were hanged at the Schuylkill County and Carbon County, Pennsylvania prisons.

 A “coffin notice”, allegedly posted by Molly Maguires in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania.

1895  The Kiel Canal was officially opened.

 

1898   The United States captured Guam from Spain.

1905 Jean-Paul Sartre, French philosopher and writer, Nobel Prize  laureate, was born  (declined) (d. 1980).

1912  Mary McCarthy, American writer, was born  (d. 1989).

1915  The U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in Guinn v. United States 238 US 347 1915, striking down an Oklahoma law denying the right to vote to some citizens.

1919  The Royal Canadian Mounted Police fired a volley into a crowd of unemployed war veterans, killing two, during the Winnipeg General Strike.

 

1919   Admiral Ludwig von Reuter scuttled the German fleet in Scapa Flow, Orkney. The nine sailors killed were the last casualties of World War I.

1921  Judy Holliday, American actress, was born  (d. 1965)

1921  Jane Russell, American actress, was born. 

1940  The first successful west-to-east navigation of Northwest Passage began at Vancouver, British Columbia.

 

1942   World War II: Tobruk fell to Italian and German forces.

1942  World War II: A Japanese submarine surfaced near the Columbia River in Oregon, firing 17 shells at nearby Fort Stevens in one of only a handful of attacks by the Japanese against the United States mainland.

1944 Ray Davies, English musician (The Kinks), was born.

1945  World War II: The Battle of Okinawa ended.

Two Marines from the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines advance on Wana Ridge on May 18, 1945

1947  Joey Molland, English musician (Badfinger), was born.

1948 Ian McEwan, English writer, was born.

1948  Columbia Records introduced the long-playing record album in a public demonstration at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

Most LPs were pressed in black vinyl with a paper label in the center of each side. However, colored and picture discs were also made

1952  Philippine School of Commerce, through a republic act, was converted to Philippine College of Commerce; later to be the Polytechnic University of the Philippines.

1957  Ellen Louks Fairclough was sworn in as Canada’s first woman Cabinet Minister.

1964 The Beatles landed in New Zealand.

The Beatles land in NZ

1964  Three civil rights workers, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Mickey Schwerner, were murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi,, by members of the Ku Klux Klan.

   

1973   In handing down the decision in Miller v. California 413 US 15, the Supreme Court of the United States established the Miller Test, which now governs obscenity in U.S. law.

 

1982 Prince William of Wales, British prince and heir, was born.

1982  John Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity for the attempted assassination of U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

 

2000   Section 28 (outlawing the ‘promotion’ of homosexuality in the United Kingdom) was repealed in Scotland with a 99 to 17 vote.

2001  A federal grand jury in Alexandria, Virginia, indictws 13 Saudis and a Lebanese in the 1996 bombing of the Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 American servicemen.

 

2004   SpaceShipOne became the first privately funded spaceplane to achieve spaceflight.

2006   Pluto’s newly discovered moons were officially named Nix & Hydra.

Plutonian system.jpg 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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