Word of the day

May 14, 2011

FOMO – fear of missing out.

Hat Tip: Rob’s Blockhead Blog.


Saturday smiles

May 14, 2011

The teacher tried to come up with problems which her class of country children could relate to.

During a maths lesson she put the question: “If there are twenty sheep in a field, and one gets out through a hole in the fence, how many sheep are left in the field?”

The class was silent for a moment as they did the calculation then a girl put up her hand and said, “None.”

The teacher told her she was wrong and asked another pupil who also replied “None.”

The teacher tried a third child who said, “Well I was going to say none too, but if that’s not the right answer I don’t know what is.”

This was a problem the class ought to have been able to solve easily so the teacher thought they were having her on.

“What’s wrong, you obviously don’t know much about maths today.”

There was a moment’s silence then a pupil put up her hand.

“Sorry Ms Jones, it’s not that we don’t know about maths it’s that we do know about sheep. If there are 20 in a paddock and one goes through a hole in the fence the other 19 will follow it.”


9/10

May 14, 2011

My other trivia quiz scores this week have been underwhelming but I managed 9/10 in the Herald’s Question Time.


6/10

May 14, 2011

6/10 in Stuff’s Biz Quiz.


Are these within the rules?

May 14, 2011

My farmer spotted these signs near Waitati a couple of days ago.

It’s not easy to see in the photos but there does appear to be an authorisation statement so they probably comply with the Electoral Act.

But the Dunedin City Council has a by-law prohibiting such signs outside the three month campaign period and it’s a little more than six months until the election.

Unless they have special consent these signs are another sign that Labour has a very casual attitude towards the rules.


Discipline not passion leads to success

May 14, 2011

Quote of the week from Joanne Black in The Listener:

“So here we are a mite over six months from the general election, and the idea of Hone Harawira, John Minto, Annette Sykes, Sue Bradford and Nandor Tanczos et al joining together in a political party induces the same warning bells that used to ring when a group of friends announced they were going to flat together. You could run a sweepstake on whether it would all fall apart once the meat-eaters were told they had to use a separate fridge, or over whether there should be a roster of whose turn it was to write the roster.

In this case, there might also be the potential for seeds of discord, with Minto having led a successful anti-racism group and Harawira being uncomfortable with the thought his kids might date Pakeha. There’s no shortage of passion among the names so far associated with the Mana Party, but it is discipline rather than passion that is the hallmark of the most successful political parties. . . “

Black did omit Matt McCarten from the list of party people and he does have a track record in getting start-up parties going. He was active in the early days of the Maori Party and played an important role in the campaigns which got co-leaders Tariana Turia and Pita Sharples into parliament under for the Maori Party.

However, one good strategist and organiser isn’t enough. Successful parties also need cohesion and unity of purpose.

The Mana Party looks a lot more like a collection of activists with individual platforms than a group of people united by shared vision and values.


May 14 in history

May 14, 2011

1264  Battle of Lewes: Henry III was captured and forced to sign the Mise of Lewes, making Simon de Montfort the de facto ruler of England.

 

1483  Coronation of Charles VIII of France (Charles l’Affable).

1509 Battle of Agnadello: French forces defeated the Venetians.

1608  The Protestant Union was founded in Auhausen.

1610 Henry IV of France was assassinated bringing Louis XIII to the throne.

1643  Four-year-old Louis XIV became King of France upon the death of his father, Louis XIII.

 

1727 Thomas Gainsborough, English artist ,was born (d. 1788).

1747  A British fleet under Admiral George Anson defeated the French at first battle of Cape Finisterre.

Bay of Biscay map.png

1796  Edward Jenner administered the first smallpox vaccination.

1804 The Lewis and Clark Expedition departed from Camp Dubois and began its journey by traveling up the Missouri River.

 

1811 Paraguay gained independence from Spain.

1836 The Treaties of Velasco were signed.

1861 The Canellas meteorite, an 859-gram chondrite type meteorite, struck  the earth near Barcelona.

1863 American Civil War: The Battle of Jackson.

Battle of Jackson
 

1868 Japanese Boshin War: end of the Battle of Utsunomiya Castle.

UtsunomiyaCastle.jpg

1870 The first game of rugby in New Zealand was played in Nelson between Nelson College and the Nelson Rugby Football Club.

1879  The first group of 463 Indian indentured labourers arrives in Fiji aboard the  Leonidas.

1889  The children’s charity the NSPCC was launched in London.

 

1907 The Plunket Society was formed.

Plunket Society formed

1913   New York Governor William Sulzer approved the charter for the Rockefeller Foundation, which began operations with a $100 million donation from John D. Rockefeller.

Rockefeller Foundation logo.png

1925  Virginia Woolf‘s novel Mrs Dalloway was published.

 
Mrs. Dalloway cover.jpg

1926 Eric Morecambe, British comedian, was born  (d. 1984).

 

1927 Cap Arcona was launched at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg.

Cap Arcona 1.JPG

1929 Barbara Branden, Canadian writer and lecturer, was born.

The Passion of Ayn Rand.jpg

1929 – Wilfred Rhodes took his 4000th first-class wicket during a performance of 9 for 39 at Leyton.

A man with a moustache, wearing a cap, white shirt with rolled-up sleeves, white trousers, cricket pads and gloves, holds a cricket bat on his left side. The bat has white stripes at the bottom. He is walking on grass in front of a wall behind which can be seen spectators.

1931  Ådalen shootings: five people were killed in Ådalen, Sweden, as soldiers open fired on an unarmed trade union demonstration.

 

1935 The Philippines ratified an independence agreement.

1939 Lina Medina became  the world’s youngest confirmed mother in medical history at the age of five.

1940 ‘H’.  (Herbert) Jones, British Soldier (VC recipient), was born (d. 1982).

San-Carlos-Cemetery.JPG

1940  World War II: Rotterdam was bombed by the German Luftwaffe.

1940  World War II: The Netherlands surrendered to Germany.

1940  The Yermolayev Yer-2, a long-range Soviet medium bomber, has its first flight.

1943  A Japanese submarine sank  AHS Centaur off the coast of Queensland.

A single-funnelled merchant ship at rest. The ship is painted white, with a dark horizontal band along the hull, interspersed by dark crosses. The number "47" is painted near the bow, in a black box above the line.

1948  Israel was declared to be an independent state and a provisional government established.

A white flag with horizontal blue bands close to the top and bottom, and a blue star of David in the middle

1955 Cold War: Eight communist bloc countries signed a mutual defense treaty -the Warsaw Pact.

1961  American civil rights movement: The Freedom Riders bus was fire-bombed near Anniston, Alabama, and the civil rights protesters were beaten by an angry mob.

1966 Fabrice Morvan, French music artist (Milli Vanilli), was born.

1970  The Red Army Faction was established in Germany.

RAF-Logo.svg

1973 Human Space Flight: Skylab, the United States’ first space station was launched.

1975 Carlos Spencer, New Zealand rugby player, was born.

Carlos Spencer.jpg

1986 Pride of Baltimore was lost at sea.

Pride of Baltimore II

1988 Carrollton bus collision: a drunk driver travelling the wrong way hit a converted school bus carrying a church youth group killing  27.

2004 The Constitutional Court of South Korea overturned the impeachment of President Roh Moo-hyun.

2005  The former USS America, a decommissioned supercarrier was deliberately sunk in the Atlantic Ocean after four weeks of live-fire exercises.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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