Labour signs down but party unrepentant

April 21, 2011

The Labour Party has had to take down its look-alike signs from a Hutt Valley street but is unrepentant:

A number of Labour Party campaign signs have been removed from a Hutt Valley street after being found to be in breach of road requirements.

The signs, which emulate road stop signs in shape and colour, but contain the message “Stop asset sales vote Labour”, had been erected along the median strip of a road in Petone.

The story credits David Farrar with breaking the story.

General secretary of the Labour Party Chris Flatt said the party had not been formally told of any rules the signs had breached.

“We were told they were taken down within an hour,” Mr Flatt told NZPA.

“Any reasonable person would see that the nature of the writing and the ‘vote Labour’ on there indicates they’re not traffic control devices.”

Mr Flatt said the party would continue to use the signs and had told members to be cautious near roads.

“We’re aware of these things but we think this is a little bit of a campaign by National Party bloggers and right-wing groups to take the issue away from the actual campaign.”

Oh dear – they’ve broken the law, which is quite explicit, and it’s all the fault of National party bloggers and right-wing groups.

There’s no mention about whether or not the signs had a promoter’s statement as required by electoral regulations.

The signs might also have fallen foul of local body regulations – individuals and groups putting up signs require consent.

I wouldn’t put any money on Labour having applied for it.


Word of the day

April 21, 2011

Macrophobia – fear of long waits.


Thursday’s quiz

April 21, 2011

1. Who said: “To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine.”?

2. On which hill was Jesus crucified?

3. What is the title of the poem which starts: They went with songs to the battle. . .

4. Who, in response to an observation that New Zealand soldiers didn’t salute very often said, “You should try waving to them. They always wave back.”?

5. It’s Elizabeth II’s birthday today – how old is she?


12/15

April 21, 2011

The Dom Post has a licence test – I scored 12/15 in it.

One of those I got wrong was the amount of alcohol (which I underestimated) but I never have more than a single glass of wine if I’m going to be driving so I know I’m under the limit without needed to know what it is.


Labour doesn’t care about breaking law – again

April 21, 2011

If the three strikes law applied to breaking the law on campaigning then Labour would be well and truly out by now.

You’d think after the condemnation from across the political spectrum for previous breaches (pledge card anyone?) they’d be especially careful about sticking to the law this time.

But no, they’re using stop-sign look-alikes which are on or visible from the road.

Kiwiblog, Keeping  Stock , Whaleoil   and Roarprawn all posted on how this contravenes Land Transport Rules and Andrew Geddis pointed out it also contravenes the Electoral Act because there’s no promotor’s statement on them.

Whaleoil has also found Facebook entries which shows they’re going to carry on breaking the law with car stickers.

It’s bad enough that a party which is supposed to be one of the major ones doesn’t know the law as it applies to campaigning. Worse still is Phil Goff’s reaction:

Labour leader Phil Goff, who launched the campaign last week, said he didn’t know who within his party had put the signs up, “but if the council has a problem of course they can talk to whoever might have put them out”.

While the signs were modelled on stop signs “nobody’s going to mistake it as a stop sign, that’s just silly”. . .

. . .”We’ll keep using those signs. If the council’s got a problem we’ll listen to them of course, but nobody thinks they’re going to be a traffic hazard, that’s just nonsense.”

The leader of the second biggest party in parliament thinks law is silly and Labour is going to keep on ignoring it – that’s not a responsible stance for anyone let alone a party which is supposed to be a government in waiting.

Cactus Kate says Labour should stop the bad social media campaigns. The party should also stop thinking the law doesn’t apply to them.

A party which doesn’t know the law with a leader that doesn’t care about it can’t be trusted back into government where it can make the law.


Labour doesn’t get it, National and the public do

April 21, 2011

Trans Tasman gets to the nub of Labour’s failure and National’s support:

Labour’s bigger problem is its failure to communicate a relevant message in the current political climate.

On the other side of the fence, Finance Minister Bill English reckons there hasn’t been a time in NZ’s recent history when the need for change in how the country is run has been more widely understood by the public. Get spending down, cut out waste, make the country more efficient, lift exports, start paying our way in the world again: it’s a simple plan which every household understands.

Rob Muldoon once said, “Most people wouldn’t recognise a deficit if they fell over it.”

Whether or not that was true at the time it certainly isn’t now.

There can’t be many people who don’t understand the dire state of the economy and the need for tough medicine to cure it.

We can’t keep spending more than we earn and the situation is sufficiently grave that a bit of tinkering won’t fix it.

Election year Budgets usually have a few sweeteners. The government has made it quite clear this one won’t – no more extra spending in total, increases in any areas will have to be matched by cuts in others.

National recognises the problem and has a solution. The public understands what they’re doing and why. 

Meanwhile on anotehr planet Labour is still talking of spending increases and tinkering with GST and that’s one of the reasons they’re not making traction.

They don’t get it but National and the public do.


April 21 in history

April 21, 2011

On April 21:

753 BC – Romulus and Remus founded Rome (traditional date).

 

43 BC Battle of Mutina: Mark Antony was again defeated in battle by Aulus Hirtius, who was killed.

M Antonius.jpg 

1509  Henry VIII ascended the throne of England on the death of his father, Henry VII.

1519 Hernán Cortés landed in Veracruz.

1651 Blessed Joseph Vaz, Apostle of Ceylon, was born.

1671 John Law, Scottish economist, was born  (d. 1729) .

1729 Catherine II of Russia, known as ‘Catherine the Great’, was born  (d. 1796) .

1792 Tiradentes, a revolutionary leading a movement for Brazil’s independence, was hung, drawn and quartered.

Figueiredo-MHN-Tiradentes.jpg

1809 Two Austrian army corps were driven from Landshut by a First French Empire army led by Napoleon I of France as two French corps to the north held off the main Austrian army on the first day of the Battle of Eckmühl.

Echmühl.jpg

1816  Charlotte Brontë, English author, was born  (d. 1855) .

1836 Texas Revolution: The Battle of San Jacinto – Republic of Texas forces under Sam Houston defeated troops under Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

The Battle of San Jacinto (1895).jpg

1838 John Muir, Scottish environmentalist, was born (d. 1914) .

1863 Bahá’u’lláh, considered the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, declared his mission as “He whom God shall make manifest“.

 

1894 Norway formally adopted the Krag-Jørgensen rifle as the main arm of its armed forces, a weapon that would remain in service for almost 50 years.

Norwegian K-J M1912 closeup.png

1898 Spanish-American War: The U.S. Congress, recognised that a state of war existed between the United States and Spain.

1915 Anthony Quinn, Mexican-born American actor, was born (2001) .

1918 World War I: German fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, known as “The Red Baron”, was shot down and killed over Vaux sur Somme.

 

1922 The first Aggie Muster was held as a remembrance for fellow Aggies who had died in the previous year.

 

1923 John Mortimer, English barrister and writer, was born (d. 2009) .

Rumpole.png

1926  Queen Elizabeth II was born.

Head and shoulders portrait of a thoughtful-looking toddler with curly, fair hair 

1942 World War II: The most famous (and first international) Aggie Muster was held on the Philippine island of Corregidor, by Brigadier General George F. Moore (with 25 fellow Aggies who are under his command), while 1.8 million pounds of shells pounded the island over a 5 hour attack.

 

1952 Secretarys’ Day (now Administrative Professionals’ Day) was first celebrated.

1959 Robert Smith, British musician (The Cure), was born.

1960 Brasília, Brazil’s capital, was officially inaugurated. At 9:30 am the Three Powers of the Republic were simultaneously transferred from the old capital, Rio de Janeiro.

1960 – Founding of the Orthodox Bahá’í Faith in Washington, D.C.

1961 The first Golden Shears contest was held – won by Ivan Bowen.

First Golden Shears competition

 1962 The Seattle World’s Fair (Century 21 Exposition) opened – the first World’s Fair in the United States since World War II.

 

1963 The Universal House of Justice of the Bahá’í Faith was elected for the first time.

 

1964 A Transit-5bn satellite failed to reach orbit after launch; as it re-entered the atmosphere, 2.1 pounds of radioactive plutonium in its SNAP RTG power source was widely dispersed.

 

1965 The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair opened for its second and final season.

1966  Rastafari movement: Haile Selassie of Ethiopia visited Jamaica, an event now celebrated as Grounation Day.

1967  A few days before the general election in Greece, Colonel George Papadopoulos led a coup d’état, establishing a military regime that lasted for seven years.

1970 The Hutt River Province Principality seceded from Australia.

Hutt River Flag.jpg Hutt River Seal.jpg

1975  Vietnam War: President of South Vietnam Nguyen Van Thieu fled Saigon, as Xuan Loc, the last South Vietnamese outpost blocking a direct North Vietnamese assault on Saigon, fell.

 

1987 Tamil Tigers were blamed for a car bomb that exploded in Colombo, killing 106 people.

Ltte emblem.jpg

1989 – Tiananmen Square Protests: In Beijing, around 100,000 students gathered in Tiananmen Square to commemorate Chinese reform leader Hu Yaobang.

 

1993 – The Supreme Court in La Paz, Bolivia, sentenced former dictator Luis Garcia Meza to 30 years in jail without parole for murder, theft, fraud and violating the constitution.

1994 – The first discoveries of extrasolar planets were announced by astronomer Alexander Wolszczan.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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