Rural round-up

Current season better than last – Allan Barber blogs:

After what all processors termed a challenging season last year, the mood this season is decidedly more buoyant after a solid first four months when dry weather throughout the country produced good stock flows. Regular rain since early February in the main farming regions has slowed things down a bit, but the onset of autumn and the dairy cow cull will ensure reasonably consistent livestock availability without any likelihood of a seasonal peak.

Showing ’em how – Martin van Beynen reckoned mustering was easy:

I am often asked for advice – as in “How would you like your face smashed in?” – so it was no surprise when Steve Palmer and Kara Lynn sought my help for the autumn muster on their high- country station, Tinline Downs, near Waiau in North Canterbury.

Steve and Kara had heard about my mustering expertise via an article in this newspaper about Lakes Station near Lake Sumner.

In the course of investigating a controversial gate on a paper road, a photographer and I found ourselves in the middle of a muster run by the legendary Ted Phipps, who owns the Lakes Station with Chief Justice Sian Elias.

One of Phipps’ farmhands, a raw young lad, took exception to the position of our vehicle, blaming it for the way some of the sheep were returning through a gate.

This was nonsense, of course, and I attempted to explain that the problem might, in fact, be a lack of dogs or men behind the sadly disjointed mob coming up the road. 

This advice came from the benefit of many years mustering our eight chooks and the flock of sheep – so vast that we knew the name of each individual – on my parents’ 10-acre block.

The advice was taken very much in the spirit in which it was intended, and some very rude language ensued.

Then Phipps arrived, and some more rude language followed, in which the word “townie” was used in a less than favourable way. . .  

The original story which prompted the invitation to muster is here.

NZ wool carpets and rugs launched in US:

New Zealand rugs and carpets using strong wool drawn from Wool Equities Ltd and New Zealand Romney suppliers will be unveiled in prestigious US stores on Friday.

The Just Shorn collection will be launched surrounded by in store displays including wool bales, woolshed doors and videos of New Zealand farmers telling their stories about working with sheep and wool. About 30 rug stores and 85 carpet stores in the luxury IDG chain (part of CCA Global) will feature the collection. . .

Steve and Jane win first East Coast environment award – rivettingKate Taylor posts on the Wyn-Harris’s win:

Congratulations to Steve and Jane Wyn-Harris – the inaugural winners of the East Coast Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

You know, I’m actually looking forward to not typing that ECBFEA phrase for a while! . .

US milk production – shouting down the suply chain – Dr Jon Hauser at X-Cheque blog writes:

If you are into numbers, the trends in demand and supply are a fascinating topic and especially when you apply the concept to the dairy industry. The theory is simple – an increase in demand allows prices to rise, encouraging supply growth. As stocks and supply increase to the point of excess prices fall resulting in a contraction of supply and reset of the supply demand balance. The reality is a long way from simple and that has certainly proved to be the case in our research on the US dairy market. . .

Better communicaton = better in-calf rates – Pasture to Profit writes:

I’ve just seen a simple idea to improve communication between staff on a pasture based spring calving dairyfarm in Dorset, UK. This came to light at the “Realfarmer” discussion group…..a group for Herdsmen & Herd Managers/farm staff on pasture based dairy farms. “Tail Tape Id”…. yes that’s right “Tail Tape Id”! . . .

This is one for the X-files – Anti Dismal writes:

There have been some seriously weird things said about the price of milk recently but this comment in an article from stuff.co.nz has to be the strangest yet:

Dairy market heavyweight Fonterra is artificially inflating the price of milk in New Zealand in a deliberate campaign to lessen competition, says an official complaint to the Commerce Commission.

Now I can not for the life of me see how inflating the price of milk can lesson competition.

We wrote about the milk price investigation here, all very exciting.

However, a new article on the stuff site started with this:

Dairy market heavyweight Fonterra is artificially inflating the price of milk in New Zealand in a deliberate campaign to lessen competition

What?  This is beyond my understanding – I need someone to get in here and explain to me how increasing the wholesale price of milk will lead to a reduction in competitive pressures.

There have been some seriously weird things said about the price of milk recently but this comment in an article from stuff.co.nz has to be the strangest yet:

Dairy market heavyweight Fonterra is artificially inflating the price of milk in New Zealand in a deliberate campaign to lessen competition, says an official complaint to the Commerce Commission.

Now I can not for the life of me see how inflating the price of milk can lesson competition. . .

The Visible Hand in Economics has similar thoughts in a couple more points on milk:

We wrote about the milk price investigation here, all very exciting.

However, a new article on the stuff site started with this:

Dairy market heavyweight Fonterra is artificially inflating the price of milk in New Zealand in a deliberate campaign to lessen competition

What?  This is beyond my understanding – I need someone to get in here and explain to me how increasing the wholesale price of milk will lead to a reduction in competitive pressures. . .

GE – 10,000 years in the making – Jon Morgan writes:

Pamela Ronald is trying to talk around a mouthful of kiwifruit, yoghurt and muesli. She’s eating breakfast at the Intercontinental in Wellington and it’s the only spare time she has in a busy round of media interviews and public meetings before flying to Auckland for a conference.

Between bites she talks about food.

“I’ve just spend a few days with friends in the Bay of Islands. They fed me really well and everything I ate, except the fish, was genetically altered.”

No, it wasn’t a meal of secretly imported food from a country that allows genetic modification. It was food bought in the local supermarket.

“Everything we eat that is farmed is genetically altered,” she explains.

“It is just the result of a long line of 10,000 years of gene manipulation.”

She should know. She is professor of plant pathology at University of California’s Davis research campus. With husband Raoul Adamchak, she has written Tomorrow’s Table on the worlds-colliding idea of integrating genetic engineering with organic farming. . .

Shearing captial’s title takes a serious hit:

Te Kuiti’s quarter-century boast to being the shearing capital of the world took a hit when young Hawke’s Bay-based Far North gun Rowland Smith won the New Zealand Open final in the town’s Cultural Centre last night, without a single local hope in the final field.

For the first time since the event was revived in 1985, there were no Te Kuiti or other King Country shearers in the big final. It is thought also to have been the only time the field did not include Te Kuiti icon David Fagan, who was eliminated in the afternoon’s semi-finals.

Stirring anthem written for vegetables #997 at Will Type for Food:

We are the turnips my friend
We’ll keep on growin’ till the end . . .

(This could be a winner in Southland during Swede season).

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