Word of the day

March 21, 2011

Ratiocinate – form judgments by a process of logic; reason or argue logically.


Rural round-up

March 21, 2011

Water rich New Zealand points to a brigther future

“Being ‘water-rich’ means that future trade prospects, and therefore future standards of living, for New Zealanders are very bright,” Water NZ CEO, Murray Gibb told a meeting of the Kapiti Central Combined Probus Club yesterday.

His presentation showed how New Zealand is one of only very few developed countries that are net food exporters. “We are actually a sustainable virtual water exporter,” he said.

Woolly walls new dream for telco deal maker:

A prominent figure in the hi-tech sector, former CallPlus shareholder and managing director Martin Wylie, has put together a new investment group and finalised its first deal, purchasing the fast growing Eco Insulation Group of companies.

Eco, with franchised operations throughout New Zealand, is a leader in the supply and installation of insulation, specialising in unique green products using planet-friendly locally-sourced sheep’s wool insulation products. The company has seen huge growth in revenue in the last three years. . .

EU relaxes GM rules – NZ Farmers Weekly reports:

British farmers could soon be given access to genetically modified animal feed after the European Union voted to relax its zero-tolerance policy to contaminated feed being imported into Europe.

It marks a step-change in the EU’s approach to GM and comes following warnings of feed shortages and inflated prices with importers increasingly wary of shipments being turned away from ports in the EU.

Europe imports about 80% of its animal feed, much of it from GM growing countries in North and South America. . .

Farmy Army comes from far and wide –  Rural News reports:

FARMERS FROM all over the country have converged on Christchurch to help clean up the February 22 quake aftermath.

A force of 800 went in during the first weekend, at first using shovels and wheelbarrows before wheeled loaders got clearance.

“It’s been incredible the number of offers of help we’ve had,” Federated Farmers Dairy chairman for North Canterbury, Kieran Stone, told Dairy News. . .

McNee the man? – Rural News picks the man most likely to head the new Primary Industry Ministry:

THE MOST likely head of the new super ministry is current MAF Director General, Wayne McNee. He will oversee the merger and be acting Fisheries CE as well as DG of MAF, until the merger takes effect on 1 February 2012.

McNee is highly regarded in government circles. He’s seen as a skilled leader and change manager. He’s also credited with re-organising MoF – which was said to be in poor shape when he took it over two years ago. Prior to heading up fisheries, McNee worked in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC).

Since taking over at MAF, just before Christmas, McNee has already been ringing the changes. . .

 


Irrigation companies unite

March 21, 2011

Five irrigation companies which use water from the Waitaki River have joined together to make the most of their collective strengths.

After a decade of battling to protect their rights to water, lower Waitaki irrigation companies have formed a collective to pool financial resources and knowledge.

The new Waitaki Irrigators’ Collective Ltd has just appointed a policy manager – Elizabeth Soal, of Dunedin – and plans to take a more proactive approach to issues that will affect them all.

The collective brings together the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company, Morven-Glenavy-Ikawai Irrigation Company, Maerewhenua District Water Resources Company, North Otago Irrigation Company and Upper Waitaki Community Irrigation Company, representing interests on both sides of the river.

The collective irrigates about 61,000ha in North Otago and Waimate . It will:

• Set up to protect members’ existing water rights and reliability by negotiating-bargaining with or lobbying interested parties who could influence or restrict existing rights
• To facilitate through research and best practice efficient, sustainable use of water
• Where efficiency and development result in surplus water, expand the area under irrigation
• Educate the wider community on the benefits of irrigation to the local and national economy, including reliable supply of water
• Support the interests of other irrigators and extractors whose interests do not conflict with the collective’s North Otago/WaimateWater companies pool resources

This is a very sensible initiative. It’s far better for the companies to work with each other than separately and at odds with each other as has sometimes happened in the past.



No frills, no fluff, just news

March 21, 2011

TV3 has started broadcasting early morning news again, no frills, no fluff, just news.

I like that in theory but it doesn’t fit my with morning routine in practice.

Television has pictures which mean you need to look at them at least some of the time and that’s not easy to do when doing other things which need to be done at that hour of day.

And when the pictures are rarely more than the faces of the interviewer and interviewee there’s not a great deal of difference between that and radio.

TV1’s morning business half hour is similar to TV3’s new morning news and both are much better than the chit chat and advertisements which take up most of the time on TV1’s Breakfast programme.

But if I’m not looking at the pictures I might as well be listening to the radio.


Open and closed

March 21, 2011

Today isn’t Otago Anniversary Day – that’s a couple of days away on the 23rd.

That is the date on which the John Wickliffe arrived in Port Chalmers with the first settlers.

But our provincial holiday is a nominated day which means people can choose to take it today, the closest Monday to the actual date, or any other day they see fit.

Some businesses observe today, some prefer to tack an extra day’s holiday on to Easter and some take it on another day.

That means confusion reigns today. Government agencies, council offices, banks, shops and other businesses with which we might want to interact will be open and some will be closed today, the Tuesday after Easter and whichever other day they choose.

Had the captain of the John Wickliffe been able to foresee the confusion the date of his ship’s arrival would cause, he might have chosen a better one – but which would that be?


March 21 in history

March 21, 2011

On March 21:

717 Battle of Vincy between Charles Martel and Ragenfrid.

Steuben - Bataille de Poitiers.png

1188  Accession to the throne of Japan by Emperor Antoku.

Emperor Antoku.jpg

1413 Henry V became King of England.

1556 Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer was burned at the stake.

1788 A fire in New Orleans left most of the town in ruins.

1800  Pius VII was crowned Pope in Venice with a temporary papal tiara made of papier-mâché.

Jacques-Louis David 018.jpg

1801 The Battle of Alexandria was fought between British and French forces near the ruins of Nicopolis in Egypt.

1804 Code Napoléon was adopted as French civil law.

 

1811 Nathaniel Woodard, English educationalist, was born  (d. 1891).

 

1821 First revolutionary act in Monastery of Agia Lavra, Kalavryta, Greek War of Independence.

Epanastasi.jpg

1844 The Bahá’í calendar began.

Bahai star.svg

1844 – The original date predicted by William Miller for the return of Christ.

1857  An earthquake in Tokyo  killed more than 100,000.

1863 George Owen Squier, American inventor and Major General in U.S. Signal Corp, was born (d. 1934).

 George Owen Squier.jpg

1871 Otto von Bismarck was appointed Chancellor of the German Empire.

1871 – Journalist Henry Morton Stanley began his trek to find the missionary and explorer David Livingstone.

1904 Forrest Mars Sr., American candymaker, was born  (d. 1999).

MBar 700.jpg

1905 Albert Einstein published his theory on special relativity.

1913 Over 360 are killed and 20,000 homes destroyed in the Great Dayton Flood in Ohio.

 

1918 The first phase of the German Spring Offensive, Operation Michael, began.

1919 The Hungarian Soviet Republic was established becoming the first Communist government to be formed in Europe after the October Revolution in Russia.

 

1928 Charles Lindbergh was presented the Medal of Honor for his first trans-Atlantic flight.

1933 Construction of Dachau, the first Nazi Germany concentration camp, was completed.

 

1935 Shah Reza Pahlavi formally asked the international community to call Persia by its native name, Iran, which means ‘Land of the Aryans’.

Reza Pahlavi.jpg

1936 – Margaret Mahy, New Zealand author, was born.

1937 18 people in Ponce, Puerto Rico were gunned down by a police squad acting under orders of US-appointed PR Governor, Blanton C. Winship.

 

1943 Vivian Stanshall, English musician, artist, actor, writer, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, was born.

1945  British troops liberated Mandalay, Burma.

1945 Operation Carthage – British planes bombed Gestapo headquarters in Copenhagen but also hit a school; 125 civilians were killed.

Shellhuset12.jpg

1945 Rose Stone, American musician (Sly & the Family Stone), was born. 

Seven young adults in garish clothes and hair. The most prominent is a black man in a vest with chains; he wears an enormous afro with sideburns, and looks with narrowed eyes and closed mouth at the camera.  A black woman is in a gray wig and black dress. A white man with red hair wears a leopard print shirt and pants. There are two other black men, also in afros, another white man, with a short beard and glasses, and another black woman.

1946  Ray Dorset, English Musician (Mungo Jerry)

1946 Timothy Dalton, British actor, was born.

1950 Roger Hodgson, English musician, former member of Supertramp, was born.

1951 Russell Thompkins Jr, American singer (The Stylistics), was born.

1952  Alan Freed presented the Moondog Coronation Ball, the first rock and roll concert, in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

1960 Massacre in Sharpeville: Police opened fire on a group of unarmed black South African demonstrators, killing 69 and wounding 180.

1963 Alcatraz closed.

1964 Gigliola Cinquetti won the ninth Eurovision Song Contest for Italy singing “Non ho l’età” (“I’m not old enough”).

Gigliola Cinquetti - Non ho l'età.jpg

1965 NASA launched Ranger 9, the last in a series of unmanned lunar space probes.

Ranger 9
 

1965 – Martin Luther King Jr led 3,200 people on the start of the third and finally successful civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

Martin Luther King Jr NYWTS.jpg

1968 Battle of Karameh in Jordan between Israeli Defense Forces and Fatah.

Israeli raid in house during Karama.jpg

1970 The first Earth Day proclamation was issued by San Francisco Mayor Joseph Alioto.

 

1974  Rhys Darby, New Zealand Comedian, was born.

 

1980  US President Jimmy Carter announced a United States boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow to protest the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan.

1980 – On the season finale of the soap opera Dallas, the infamous character J.R. Ewing was shot by an unseen assailant, leading to the catchphrase “Who Shot JR?”

DallasLogo.jpg

1985 – Canadian paraplegic athlete and humanitarian Rick Hansen began his circumnavigation of the globe in a wheelchair in the name of spinal cord injury medical research.

1990 – Namibia regained its independence after 75 years of South African rule.

1999 Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones became the first to circumnavigate the Earth in a hot air balloon.

 

2003 Race Relations Day was celebrated in New Zealand for the first time.

Race Relations Day celebrated for first time

2006  Immigrant workers constructing the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, The United Arab Emirates and a new terminal of Dubai International Airport joined together and riot, causing $1M in damage.

Burj Khalifa.jpg

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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