Friday’s answers

March 18, 2011

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: “And I promise I’ll never do it again. That’s the one good thing about me. I never do the same wrong thing twice.”?

2. What does pachyglossal mean?

3. It’s mensonge in French,  mentira in Spanish and teka in Maori, what is it in English?

4. Instruments which are struck, shaken or plucked belong in which section of an orchestra?

5. Which husband and wife edited Metro and North and South respectively in the 1980s?

Points for answers:

David got two with a bonus for reasoning.

Andrei got three with a bonus for extra musical explanation which earns him an electronic bunch of flowers.

Adam got 1 1/2.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Word of the day

March 18, 2011

Lachrymose – tearful or given to shedding tears or weeping; inducing tears, sad, mournful.


We Remember

March 18, 2011

The front page of today’s Press is printed in Canterbury’s colours, red and black, and headlined WE REMEMBER.

It goes on to say:

Today New Zealand pauses to remember the lives lost in the Christchurch earthquake on Tuesday, February 22.

We ponder the broken homes, destroyed livelihoods and profoundly changed lives.

The greater anguish is the loss of treasured ones to a force of nature which highlighted the preciousness of human life.

Today we recall ordinary lives, valued people, those close to us. We persevere and in doing so we honour them.

A list follows of those who died in the quake whose names have been released so far.

Inside the paper has a programme of the service:

12:00 Woolston Brass Band.

12:10: Lament by lone piper.

12:15 Arrival of official party.

12:30 Putatara (conch shell) sounded by Ben Brennan to signal the start of the service.

Mihi Whakatau Ceremony.

God Save The Queen.

12:51 The silence led by Very Reverend Peter Beck, Dean of Christchurch.

Tributes: Bob Parker, Prince William.

Reading: Sir Anand Satyanand.

Address: Prime Minister John Key.

Song: Loyal by Dave Dobbyn.

Address: Phil Gff.

Reading: Ralph Moore, Deputy Taskfroce Leader, Christchurch Urban Search and Rescue team.

Psalm 23.

Song: You’ll Never Walk Alone – Dame Malvina Major.

The lighting of the Flame by Sam Johnson and Patsy Te Are.

Hymn.

Gathering prayers.

The Lords Prayer.

Readings by representatives of Christchurch Christian churches.

Prayers of many faiths.

Song Pie Jesu by Dame Malvina Major.

Reflection by Right Reverend Victoria Matthews.

Verses of consolation by various leaders.

Benediction by Christchurch Cathedral choir.

National Anthem led by Timua Brennan and Laurence Munday, Dame Malvina Major and Hayley Westenra.

Placement of floral tributes and Recessional.

Woolston Brass Band.

Ribbon borrowed – again – from Scrubone at Something Should Go Here Maybe Later.


Good and bad news in clean-stream snapshot

March 18, 2011

A newsletter to shareholders from Fonterra chair Sir Henry van der Heyden says there’s good and bad news in the dairying and clean streams accord snapshot: 

  • Good news is we’re making headway.
    • Full compliance with effluent rules up 5% to 65%
    • 99% of farms have nutrient budgets
    • 85% of stock excluded from waterways
    • Less than 2% of farms need crossings bridged or culverted
  • Bad news is there’s been a 1% increase in significant effluent non-compliance from15% to 16%.

Fonterra said  the slight increase in significant non-compliance with regional council dairy effluent rules was unacceptable, but believed its Every Farm Every Year inspections regime was a concerted effort to turn this result around.

Today’s Dairying and Clean Streams Accord snapshot for the 2009/10 season shows significant national non-compliance rose by 1% to 16%, despite considerable improvements in Northland, Auckland, Hawkes Bay, Wellington, Canterbury and Otago.

Fonterra Group Director Supplier and External Relations, Kelvin Wickham said Every Farm Every Year was a concerted effort to address non-compliance by identifying farms at risk and ensuring remedial plans were put in place.

“The programme got underway nationally in August so it was never going to change last season’s results. But what is encouraging is that the compliance message is getting through and farmers are taking it seriously. That’s also evident in the snapshot results for full compliance which rose 5% to 65% last season.”

He said Fonterra’s Sustainable Dairying Advisors have completed 1188 consultations with farmers keen to ensure their on-farm effluent infrastructure is able to cope with the year-round demands put on it. Farms are referred to the advisors if the Every Farm Every Year inspection identifies properties at risk of non-compliance, but Mr Wickham said some farmers had also proactively sought advice ahead of their farm’s assessment.

“Our initiative is beginning to have a positive impact with farmers willing to accept advice and to spend the money needed to improve their effluent systems. By the end of this season we expect to have 1,000 remedial plans in place. Since August, 252 farms have already completed their plans and a further 582 are underway. There are no quick fixes but farmers are working hard to get it right and in many cases a significant investment is needed to ensure systems are compliant 365 days a year.”

Mr Wickham said good progress was being made on other Accord targets and Fonterra was this year highlighting the work of five farmers who were contributing to this progress.

Work done by these farmers who have put the Dairying  Accord into action can be seen here.  Their work includes improved fertiliser management, fencing waterways and tree planting.

“Across the country there is a lot of good work going on unnoticed and while we know there’s more work to be done, it’s also appropriate to acknowledge the real efforts being made.”

The snapshot showed 85% of farms nationally now have stock excluded from waterways and in Northland, Canterbury, Otago and Southland 90% have been excluded. Less than 2% of farms required bridges or culverts for waterways. Nutrient budgets had been adopted by 99% of farms but the challenge now was to work towards full management plans where nutrient inputs and outputs are measured and managed.

“The results show a lot of good effort has gone in from farmers, regional councils and organisations like DairyNZ and Every Farm Every Year is stepping up the effort in the key area of compliance.”

Farms working through remedial plans include those which could pass a compliance spot check, but farmers still accepted the work had to be done.

“Every Farm Every Year assesses whether an on-farm system is fit for purpose 365 days a year. This is about risk assessment and mitigation, not compliance monitoring. It’s not enough for a farm to comply 90% of the time. Year round compliance is what we are looking for and that’s where we are heading.”

Mr Wickham said risk factors being identified on farms mirrored those identified in the Dairying and Cleans Streams Accord snapshot.

“We know effluent storage capacity, irrigation systems and feed pads or standoffs are all potential trouble spots. Without adequate storage farmers can’t defer irrigation in wet conditions and Every Farm Every Year helps them recognise that. They are also recognising the value of effluent as a source of nutrients and can see the money spent on upgrading systems has a relatively quick payback through better grass growth and productivity.”

He said new tools like the Massey University effluent pond storage calculator were invaluable for ensuring individual farms had storage matched to soil types, herd size, production days, yard and feedpad areas and irrigation capacity. DairyNZ had also successfully established a new industry code of practice to ensure the design and installation of effluent systems meets set standards. Positive working relationships between regional councils, Fonterra and DairyNZ also meant farmers were getting good information and practical programmes such as open days.

“There is a lot of commitment out there and both Fonterra and our farmers are taking sustainability very seriously. There’s a way to go, but the effort is going in and we are starting to see some promising results.”

Agriculture Minsiter Minister David Carter said farmers are slowly taking heed of the need to lift their game to prevent pollution.

Mr Carter says that while progress could be faster, the message is gradually getting through to those farmers who have struggled with effluent compliance, and are now looking to their industry bodies and regional councils for support

“For example, in Canterbury, the ‘Check it, fix it, get it right’ initiative has been working to provide information and advice to farmers on adopting good effluent management practices.

“In the 2009/10 dairy season, 59 percent of Canterbury dairy farms were fully compliant with their dairy-shed effluent discharge conditions, up from 43 percent in the previous season. Significant non-compliance fell to 8 percent from 19 percent in the previous season.

“This initiative is now being rolled out throughout the North Island, and Southland.

The 2009/10 Snapshot shows progress has been made on four of the five targets set by the Accord.

Mr Carter also notes that Fonterra’s Every Farm Every Year checks of effluent management expects to have about 1000 farms on remedial plans by the end of the current dairy season.

“It’s encouraging that many of those farmers did not wait to be checked, but got in touch with the co-operative to ask for the plan.

“While it can’t be directly attributed to those initiatives, Environment Waikato has reported that significant non-compliance has more than halved in the season-to-date, with just 11 percent of farmers in serious breach of regional planning rules.”

“There is now a good deal of education, training and technological innovation underway in the dairy sector, all aimed at maintaining productivity while reducing environmental impact,” says Mr Carter.

Farmers in our area are taking the Accord very seriously. Most are motivated by the determination to keep the water they drink and swim in clean.

For the few for whom that carrot isn’t sufficient there’s the stick of severe and costly consequences of falling foul of regional council requirements. There’s also the knowlege that Fonterra has lost patience with the minority who are deliberately or carelessly polluting waterways and tarring all dairy farmers with their dirty brush.

The full snapshot is here.


Time to reflect

March 18, 2011

The timing of today’s memorial service in Christchurch has been criticised as being too soon and some want to wait until the Febraury 22 next year, the first anniversary of the earthquake.

It would be appropriate to mark the first anniversary in some way but today provides a much-needed opportunity for people in Christchurch, throughout New Zealand and further afield to remember and reflect.

More than 160 people from some 20 countries lost their lives, others were injured and a great many more have lost homes, jobs and businesses.

Today’s service will be ecumenical, multi-faith and multi-cultural.

It will not be the end of the grief.

It will be a stage on the road to recovery for those directly affected and be an opportunity for the rest of us to think of the city, its people, the people from other countries who died, their family and friends and also the people of Japan still dealing with their post-quake crisis.

It will be a time for tears but also for hope such as that expressed in this message from Rev Geoff and Gillian King of Knox Church.

The shell of their church building on the corner of Victoria Street and Bealey Avenue was often in the background of news broadcasts but they say the destruction of buildings doesn’t imply the demise of communities or faith.

On return from a morning walk Geoff wrote:

The birds were back this morning.
I could hear one or two of them singing,
As silt-laden wind chased the dog and me around our broken streets.
The birds were back, and with them the song of something other than sirens,
Or the low-pitched rumble of an earthquake,
Or the terrified screams of fleeing lunchtime shoppers
Or the muffled sobs of brave and bewildered men, women and children
Trying unsuccessfully to fight back tears.
The birds were back,
and as the sun strove vainly to pierce the swirling cloud of pulverised
masonry and liquefaction
their song sounded
a
bit
like
“Hope”

Today’s service will provide the opportunity to express sorrow. May it also give comfort and hope.


March 18 in history

March 18, 2011

On March 18:

37 The Roman Senate annulled Tiberius‘ will and proclaimed Caligula emperor.

1229 Frederick II,  Holy Roman Emperor declared himself King of Jerusalem during the Sixth Crusade.

1241 Kraków was ravaged by Mongols.

1314 Jacques de Molay, the 23rd and the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar, was burned at the stake.

 

1438 Albert II of Habsburg became King of Germany.

1608 Susenyos was formally crowned Emperor of Ethiopia.

1766 The British Parliament repealed the Stamp Act, which had been very unpopular in the British colonies.

 American newspapers reacted to the Stamp Act with anger and predictions of the demise of journalism.

1781 Charles Messier rediscovered global cluster M92.

1834  Six farm labourers from Tolpuddle were sentenced to be transported to Australia for forming a trade union.

1837 Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th President of the United States, was born (d. 1908).

1850 American Express was founded by Henry Wells and William Fargo.

American Express logo

1858 Rudolf Diesel, German inventor, was born  (d. 1913).

1865 The Congress of the Confederate States of America adjourned for the last time.

1869 Neville Chamberlain, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born  (d. 1940).

A well-dressed, aging man is seated in a chair and looks sideways towards the camera.

1871 Declaration of the Paris Commune; President of the French Republic, Adolphe Thiers, ordered evacuation of Paris.

 

1893 Former Governor General Lord Stanley pledged to donate a silver challenge cup, later named after him, as an award for the best hockey team in Canada – the Stanley Cup.

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1893 Wilfred Owen, British poet, was born (d 1918).

1906 Traian Vuia flew the first self-propelled heavier-than-air aircraft in Europe.

 

1913  King George I of Greece was assassinated in the recently liberated city of Thessaloniki.

1915 Richard Condon, American novelist, was born (d. 1996).

ManchurianCandidate.jpg

1915 Three battleships were sunk during a failed British and French naval attack on the Dardanelles.

1921  The second Peace of Riga between Poland and Soviet Union.

1922 Mohandas Gandhi was sentenced to six years in prison for civil disobedience. He would serve only 2 years.

 

1922 – The first public celebration of Bat mitzvah, for the daughter of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan, was held in New York City.

1923 Mathrubhumi one of the largest Malayalam daily started to publish from Kozhikode in Kerala.

1925 The Tri-State Tornado hit the Midwestern states of Missouri, Illinois and Indiana, killing 695 people.

1928 Fidel V. Ramos, 12th President of the Philippines, was born.

1932 John Updike, American author, was born (d. 2009).

1936 Frederik Willem de Klerk, President of South Africa, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, was born.

1937 The New London School explosion killed three hundred, mostly children.

 

1937 –  Spanish Republican forces defeated the Italians at the Battle of Guadalajara.

Bundesarchiv Bild 183-2006-1204-513, Spanien, Schlacht um Guadalajara.jpg

1937 – The human-powered aircraft, Pedaliante, flew1 kilometre (0.62 mi) outside Milan.

 

1938 Charley Pride, American musician, was born.

1938  Mexico nationalised all foreign-owned oil properties within its borders.

1940 Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met at the Brenner Pass and agreed to form an alliance against France and the United Kingdom.

1941 New Zealand troops arrived in Greece to bolster Allied defences.

NZ troops arrive in Greece

1944 Dick Smith, Australian Adventurer and Businessman, was born.

 

1944 The eruption of Mount Vesuvius  killed 26 and causes thousands to flee their homes.

1945 Joy Fielding, Canadian novelist and actress, was born.

 

1945 World War II: 1,250 American bombers attacked Berlin.

1947 Patrick Barlow, English actor, comedian and playwright, was born.

1949 Alex Higgins, Northern Irish snooker player, was born  (d. 2010).

Alexhiggins1968.jpg

1950 John Hartman, American drummer (Doobie Brothers), was born.

1951  Ben Cohen, American co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, was born.

Ben and jerry logo.svg

1953 An earthquake hit western Turkey, killing 250.

1959 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a bill into law allowing for Hawaiian statehood.

1960 James MacPherson, Scottish actor, was born.

1962 The Evian Accords put an end to the Algerian War of Independence.

1965 Cosmonaut Aleksei Leonovleft his spacecraft Voskhod 2 for 12 minutes to become the first person to walk in space.

 

1967 The supertanker Torrey Canyon ran aground off the Cornish coast.

1968  Gold standard: The U.S. Congress repeals the requirement for a gold reserve to back US currency.

1970 Lon Nol ousted Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia.

1971 A landslide at Chungar, Peru crashed into Lake Yanahuani killing 200.

1974 Oil embargo crisis: Most OPEC nations ended a five-month oil embargo against the United States, Europe and Japan.

 

1980 At Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia, 50 people were killed by an explosion of a Vostok-2M rocket on its launch pad during a fueling operation.

Vostok 8K72K rocket on display in Moscow

1989 A 4,400-year-old mummy was found near the Pyramid of Cheops.

 

1990  In the largest art theft in US history, 12 paintings, collectively worth around $300 million, were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts.

1996 A nightclub fire in Quezon City, Philippines killed 162.

1997  The tail of a Russian Antonov An-24 charter plane breaks off while en-route to Turkey causing the plane to crash and killing all 50 on board and leading to the grounding of all An-24s.

2003 – British Sign Language was recognised as an official British language.

 

2006 – Mike Rann secured the first Labor majority government in South Australia since 1985 by winning the state election.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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