WordPress still inaccessible for some

March 6, 2011

Andrei at NZ Conservative is finding that yesterday’s problem accessing WordPress blogs is still going on.

The cause of the problem is DDoS attacks (which is beyond my limited understanding of technology to explain).

I can’t get my own or any other WordPress blogs on my phone but haven’t found any problems accessing any of them on my home computer of my farmer’s and my laptops.

I can also read updated RSS feeds of posts from WordPress blogs on Google Reader.

Not everyone is having access problems. There haven’t been many comments this weekend but the number of visitors is slightly ahead of the number last Saturday and Sunday.


Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations

March 6, 2011

Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations by Jerome Rothenberg was featured this week on the Tuesday Poem blog.

Some of the Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar responded to the earthquake:

Songs and Dances of Death by Catherine Fitchett

Storm Front by Helen Lowe

As the Earth Turns by Mary McCallum

Flutter by Brian Turner

Epicentre by Jennifer Compton

Kiwi Heros by Alicia Ponder

this fly – earthquake by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Christchurch to Greymouth by Renee Liang

Among some of the other Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar are:

Treasure by Saradha Koirala

Venice by Robyn Rowland


Rural round-up

March 6, 2011

Global milk production 7 – climate 1: Dr Jon Hauser  at Xheque blog writes:

Here at Xcheque we have for some time been warning about the pace of growth in global milk production. Year on year Production from the major global exporters increased by more than 4 billion litres in the 7 month period from May to November 2010 (EU27, US, NZ, AUS, ARG). 

To put 2010 milk production growth in perspective, average annual milk production growth from 2006 to 2009 was 1.8 billion litres. During the runup of global commodity prices in 2007 the total increase for the year was 3 billion litres. Dairy commodity prices fell steadily from the peak in September / October 2007 and then, with the onset of the global financial crisis, collapsed dramatically in the second half of 2008. . .

Industrial agreements should reflect modern work practice – Allan Barber at Barber’s Meaty Issues writes:

In spite of the enormous improvements from the bad old days, starting with the Employment Contracts Act’s (ECA) introduction in the early 1990s, there remain anomalies in the meat industry’s agreements which hinder the achievement of greater efficiency. The main challenges for meat processors stem from the combined impact of traditional worker agreements, employment law, processing complexity and reduced livestock volumes on an increasingly seasonal industry. . .

Allan also writes that the sector strategy is vulnerable to grass growth:

At the end of the sector strategy’s first stage there will be a plan which draws on the interviews with farmers, processors and stock agents, analysis of a huge amount of data, and input from the consultation meetings held round the country. I’m assured, and have no reason to doubt, there has been a robust consultation process across the industry and the meat processors are cooperating fully, because they are serious about showing leadership in the market.

Of course it’s easy to avoid cutting each other’s throat in the market place when there’s keen demand for every kilo of product on offer; in fact the only danger is under achieving on price, because it will probably be higher tomorrow than the contract concluded today.

What is a GB Olympic oarsman doing sharemilking in New Zealand? Pasture to Profit writes:

Richard & Louise Hamilton are highly successful sharemilkers in the Bay of Plenty in New Zealand. However Richard was in the 1996 Great Britain Rowing team at the Atlanta Olympics. This 6.5ft giant of a man was in the GB Rowing Men’s Eight. http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/athletes/ha/richard-hamilton-2.html

So why is this English Olympian milking cows in New Zealand?…did he ever imagine he would be milking cows in NZ?….

Plagued by Politics –  the Economist  writes:

“THIS is the craziest thing we’re doing,” says Peter Brabeck, the chairman of Nestlé. He is talking about government biofuels targets which require a certain proportion of national energy needs to be met from renewable fuels, most of them biofuels (ie, ethyl alcohol made from crops, usually maize or sugar).

The targets are ambitious. Brazil, Japan, Indonesia and the European Union all say biofuels must supply 10% of energy demand for transport by 2020. China’s target for that date is 5%. America aspires to meet 30% of such needs from biofuels by 2030.

(Hat tip Biofules and Food at Anti Dismal.

Why we don’t actually want to be self-sufficient in food – Tim Worstall writes:

The attractive-looking vegetable, which has become a staple in many chattering class households, has suffered due to the long, wet and cold winter.

Britain’s biggest farmer of the vegetable said “100 per cent” of her winter crop had been wiped out and that there would be a severe shortage in supermarkets over the next few weeks, traditionally the peak season.

OK, purple sprouting broccoli is hardly an essential part of anyone’s diet. But…

(Hat Tip: What I’m Reading at  Quote Unquote)


What we could earn

March 6, 2011

Quote of the week:

“. . .  We weren’t looking at who should pay. We were seeing what we could earn. “- Jim Hopkins.


Gratitude

March 6, 2011

Members of the Farmy Army were moved by the plight of many of victims of the Christchurch earthquake they helped and the gratitude they received from almost all of  those they helped.

Although one group came across a notable exception.

When the volunteers entered a silt-covered property they found about half a dozen adults lounging on a trampoline drinking.

“About time someone turned up to clean up the mess,” one said before returning his attention to his beer can.

Tempted as they were to ask why these apparently able-bodied adults  hadn’t at least started to clean up themselves, the volunteers bit their tongues, dug in and moved the silt.

They then went next door where the property owners had tried to help themselves and were very grateful that others had come to lend a hand.


March 6 in history

March 6, 2011

On March 6:

1454 Thirteen Years’ War: Delegates of the Prussian Confederation pledged allegiance to King Casimir IV of Poland who agreed to commit his forces in aiding the Confederation’s struggle for independence from the Teutonic Knights.

1475 Michelangelo, Italian artist, was born (d. 1564).

1521 Ferdinand Magellan arrived at Guam.

1788 The First Fleet arrived at Norfolk Island in order to found a convict settlement.

1806 Elizabeth Barrett Browning, was born (d. 1861).

 

1820 The Missouri Compromise was signed into law by President James Monroe  allowing Missouri to enter the Union as a slave state, but made the rest of the northern part of the Louisiana Purchase territory slavery-free.

1836 Battle of the Alamo – After a thirteen day siege by an army of 3,000 Mexican troops, the 187 Texas volunteers defending the Alamo were defeated and the fort was captured.

The crumbling facade of a stone building is missing its roof and part of its second floor. A pile of stone rubble sits in the courtyard. In front of the building are a horse-drawn carriage and several people in 1850s-style clothing: women in long dresses with full skirts and men in suits with top hats.

1853 Giuseppe Verdi‘s opera La Traviata receives its premiere performance in Venice.

1857 – Supreme Court of the United States ruled in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case that people of African descent imported into the United States and held as slaves, or their descendants —whether or not they were slaves—were not protected by the Constitution and could never be citizens of the United States..

1869 Dmitri Mendeleev presented the first periodic table to the Russian Chemical Society.

1899 Bayer registered aspirin as a trademark.

1917 Frankie Howerd, English comedian, was born (d. 1992).


 

1921 Portuguese Communist Party was founded as the Portuguese Section of the Communist International.

Portuguese Communist Party official symbol.png

1926 Alan Greenspan, American economist, 13th Chairman of the Federal Reserve, was born.

 

1927 Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian writer, Nobel Prize laureate, was born.

1944  Kiri Te Kanawa, New Zealander singer, was born.

1944  Mary Wilson, American singer (The Supremes), was born.

1946 David Gilmour, British musician (Pink Floyd), was born.

1947  Kiki Dee, British singer, was born.

1947 Dick Fosbury, American athlete, was born.

A man in an athletic uniform is jumping over the high jump bar headfirst and backwards. His legs trail behind his body as he clears the bar. A high jumper performing a Fosbury flop, curving his body over the bar as he goes over it head-first and backwards

 1945 Communist-dominated government under Petru Groza assumed power in Romania.

1945 Cologne was captured by American Troops.

1946  Ho Chi Minh signed an agreement with France which recognizes Vietnam as an autonomous state in the Indochinese Federation and the French Union.

1947 The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra made its debut performance – opening the concert in Wellington’s Town Hall with God Save The King the performing selections from Dvorak, Brahms, Butterworth, Enesco, Wagner and Richard Strauss.

Debut performance of NZ Symphony Orchestra

1951 – The trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg for conspiracy to commit espionage in the USA began.

1953 Georgy Maksimilianovich Malenkov succeeded Joseph Stalin as Premier of the Soviet Union and First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.


 

1957 British colonies Gold Coast and British Togoland became the independent Republic of Ghana.

1964 Nation of Islam’s Elijah Muhammad officially gave boxing champion Cassius Clay the name Muhammad Ali.

Muhammad Ali NYWTS.jpg

1964 Constantine II became King of Greece.

 

1967  Joseph Stalin’s daughter Svetlana Alliluyeva defected to the United States.

1975 For the first time, ever, the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination was shown in motion to a national TV audience by Robert J. Groden and Dick Gregory.

 Frame 150 from the Zapruder Film

1975 – Algiers Accord: Iran and Iraq announce a settlement of their border dispute.

1981 After 19 years of presenting the CBS Evening News, Walter Cronkite signed off for the last time.

Cronkitenasa.PNG

1983 The first United States Football League game was played.

1987 The British ferry MS Herald of Free Enterprise capsized in about 90 seconds killing 193.

Herald of Free Enterprise.jpg
 

1988 Three Provisional Irish Republican Army terrorists are killed by Special Air Service in  Gibraltar in the conclusion of Operation Flavius.

1992 Michelangelo computer virus began to affect computers.

2006 South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds signed legislation banning most abortions in the state.

2008 A Palestinian gunman shot and killed 8 students and critically injured 11 in the library of the Mercaz HaRav yeshiva, in Jerusalem.

2009 – US stock markets made an historic “generational low”, with the S&P 500 index reaching an intraday low of 666.79, a level not seen in over 12 years.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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