Word of the day

February 11, 2011

Journullism –  news stories which have no news value.

Hat Tip: Another neogilism needed at Dim Post (There’s other clever sugestions in the comments).


Friday’s answers

February 11, 2011

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said : “Any man can make mistakes, but only an idiot persists in his error.”?

2. Who wrote: How to Win Friends and Influence People?

3. It’s bibliothèque in French, biblioteca in Italian and Spanish and whare pukapuka in Maoir, what is it in English?

4. Where did Texel sheep originate?

5. How many South Island electorates are there and how many people (more or less) in an electorate.

Marks for answers:

Andrei got four right and a bonus for added information which wins him an electronic red rose (in anticipation of Valentine’s Day).

Graeme got one right.

Gravedodger got four right with a bonus for added info which also earns an electronic rose.

Paul got three right (that he was able to state the obvious was my fault for not being specific about Texel) with a bonus for noting the typo, humour and for backing off the Dilligaf.

Answers follow the break.

Read the rest of this entry »


Edwards 1 – SST 0

February 11, 2011

The media is supposed to be one of the guardians of free speech, why then would a national newspaper seek to muzzle a blogger?

Brian Edwards has had a series of blog posts on Amanda Hotchin and the Sunday Star Times. 

His second last post on the matter was a carefully worded one in which he reported on four affidavits from witnesses who backed Ms Hotchin’s story. It was a model of how to give the facts without disclosing an opinion.

The SST has responded by threatening him with defamation.

The email informing him of that is headed not for publication:

I have chosen to ignore that advice. The Sunday Star Times is a national newspaper with a circulation massively bigger than my website. It has a large and powerful voice. If it is unhappy with what is said about its content or its writers, it has the opportunity, not available to the average citizen, to make a public response which will reach a large audience. Instead, in this case, it has chosen to send me a lawyer’s letter, marked “Not for Publication.” My response is that I am not prepared to be bullied or intimidated, and certainly not in secret.

Edwards 1 – SST 0.

The blog is probably read by only a few hundred thousand people but the threat ensures it will be read by many more.

It was referred to a post on the journalist’s chat group Journz last night.

It’s made the  NZ Bloggers Union see red. Cactus Kate , Kiwiblog and Whaleoil,   three  of New Zealand’s most widely read blogs, have taken up the fight for free speech.

And the paper’s only rival, The NZ Herald, is loving it.

What would have been a story read by a few hundred people is now reaching 10s of thousands.


6/10

February 11, 2011

6/10 in the Herald’s weekly news quiz.


Who does the public service serve?

February 11, 2011

Before the last election National was criticised for being Labour-lite.

There is no danger of  that this time.

Just a week after the election date was announced there are some very clear differences in the two major parties’ policies and goals.

Trans Tasman’s noticed one of the bigger ones:

Key’s underlying message is the Govt is going to structure the public sector for the people who use its services: Labour is going to defend the current structure because it suits the people who work in it.

The public service grew too big under Labour. It’s a costly burden which is weighing down the private sector.

Back room functions are necessary to support front line staff and leave them free to do the work that matters most. But when the back room expands too much and uses scarce funds needed more for services and those who provide them it’s time for rebalancing.

The public service is supposed to serve the people who need its services not those who staff it.


February 11 in history

February 11, 2011

On February 11:

660 BC – Traditional date for the foundation of Japan by Emperor Jimmu.

Jimmu cropped.jpg

1531 Henry VIII  was recognised as supreme head of the Church of England.

1752  Pennsylvania Hospital, the first hospital in the United States, opened.

1790 Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers, petitioned U.S. Congress for abolition of slavery.

1794 First session of United States Senate open to the public.

1808 Anthracite coal was first burned as a fuel, experimentally.

 

1809 Robert Fulton filed a patent for improvements to steamboat navigation.

1812 Massachusetts governor Elbridge Gerrygerrymandered” for the first time.

 

1814 Norway‘s independence was proclaimed, marking the ultimate end of the Kalmar Union.

1826 University College London was founded under the name University of London.

1826 Swaminarayan wrote the Shikshapatri, an important test within the Swaminarayan faith.

1840 Gaetano Donizetti‘s opera La Fille du Régiment received its first performance in Paris.

A grayscale portrait of a man in his late thirties. He has wavy, dark hair and a neat mustache and beard.

1843 Giuseppe Verdi‘s opera I Lombardi received its first performance in Milan.

1847 Thomas Alva Edison, American inventor, was born (d. 1931).

1855 Kassa Hailu was crowned Tewodros II, Emperor of Ethiopia, by Abuna Salama III.

 

1861 United States House of Representatives unanimously passed a resolution guaranteeing noninterference with slavery in any state.

1864 Charles Heaphy was recommended for a VC for rescuing a soldier while under fire.

Charles Heaphy recommended for VC

  1873 King Amadeus I of Spain abdicated.

1904 Sir Keith Holyoake, Prime Minister of New Zealand, was born  (d. 1983).

 

1905 Pope Pius X published the encyclical Vehementer nos.

Popepiusx.jpg
 

1916 Emma Goldman was arrested for lecturing on birth control.

 

1917 Sidney Sheldon, American author, was born  (d. 2007).

1919 Eva Gabor, Hungarian-born actress, was born (d. 1995).

1919 Friedrich Ebert (SPD), was elected President of Germany.

1920 King Farouk I of Egypt, was born  (d. 1965).

1929 Italy and the Vatican signed the Lateran Treaty.

1934 Mary Quant, English fashion designer, was born.

1936 Burt Reynolds, American actor, was born.

1938 BBC Television produced the world’s first ever science fiction television program, an adaptation of a section of  the Karel Capek play R.U.R., which coined the term “robot“.

 A scene from the play, showing three robots.

1938 Bevan Congdon, New Zealand cricketer, was born.

1939 A Lockheed XP-38 flew from California to New York in 7 hours 2 minutes.

1941 The first gold record was presented to Glenn Miller for “Chattanooga Choo Choo“.

1943 General Dwight Eisenhower was selected to command the allied armies in Europe.

 

1948 John Costello succeeded Éamon de Valera as Taoiseach of Ireland.

1963 Julia Child‘s show The French Chef premiered.

Julia Child.jpg

1964 Sarah Palin, 11th Governor of Alaska, was born.

1969 Jennifer Aniston, American actress, was born.

1971 Eighty-seven countries signed the Seabed Treaty outlawing nuclear weapons in international waters.

1973 First release of American prisoners of war from Vietnam took place.

1978  China lifted a ban on works by Aristotle, Shakespeare and Dickens.

1979 Islamic revolution of Iran achieves victory under the leadership of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

1987 Philippines constitution went into effect.

1990 Nelson Mandela, a political prisoner for 27 years, was released from Victor Verster Prison.

Official Portrait as President of South Africa

1991 UNPO, the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, formed in The Hague.

1997 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched on a mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope.

Space Shuttle Discovery

2006 Vice President of the United States Dick Cheney accidentally shot Harry Whittington in the face, neck, and upper torso while hunting quail.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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