Southland deserves to keep the shield – Updated

September 23, 2010

If ever a province deserved to win the Ranfurly Shield it was Southland.

The excitement when the Stags beat Canterbury last year infected Invercargill and the hinterland and the people have stayed behind the team.

It’s been a really tough week in the south, holding on to the shield would mean much more to Southlanders than winning it would to Aucklanders.

If it came to community support the challengers wouldn’t have a chance and the defenders know that. They’ll be playing their hearts out.

UPDATE: 9-6 to Southland. Phew!


Word of the day

September 23, 2010

Epeolatry  – worship of words.

Apropos of this, Gene Weingarten writes Good bye cruel words: English. It’s dead to me.

The English language, which arose from humble Anglo-Saxon roots to become the lingua franca of 600 million people worldwide and the dominant lexicon of international discourse, is dead. It succumbed last month at the age of 1,617 after a long illness. It is survived by an ignominiously diminished form of itself.

The end came quietly on Aug. 21 on the letters page of The Washington Post. A reader castigated the newspaper for having written that Sasha Obama was the “youngest” daughter of the president and first lady, rather than their “younger” daughter. In so doing, however, the letter writer called the first couple the “Obama’s.” This, too, was published, constituting an illiterate proofreading of an illiterate criticism of an illiteracy. Moments later, already severely weakened, English died of shame . . .

The Lewiston (Maine) Sun-Journal has written of “spading and neutering.” The Miami Herald reported on someone who “eeks out a living” — alas, not by running an amusement-park haunted house. The Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star described professional football as a “doggy dog world.” The Vallejo (Calif.) Times-Herald and the South Bend (Ind.) Tribune were the two most recent papers, out of dozens, to report on the treatment of “prostrate cancer.” . . .

Hat Tip: Beattie’s Book Blog

 

 


Fonterra final payout 2nd highest

September 23, 2010

Fonterra has announced a final payout for the 09-10 season of $6.70 before retentions.

The payout is made up of $6.10 per kilogram of milksolids (kgMS), a dividend of 27 cents a share and retentions of 33 cents share. 

This is the co-operative’s second highest payout and will give shareholders who are fully shared up a final payout of $6.37.

Fonterra reported a 12 per cent increase in after-tax profit to $685 million for the year.

Looking ahead, Mr Ferrier said there were signs that international dairy supply and demand were moving more in balance at prevailing prices, although there was still considerable volatility in international markets.

After considering these factors, the Board has firmed up the forecast payout for the 2010/11 season to $7.00-7.10 (before retentions). This includes an unchanged forecast Milk Price of $6.60 per kgMS.

Jamie Mackay listed on the Farming Show the payouts for previous seasons: (I think these are after retentions).

2001-02: $5.50; 2002-03: $316 ; 2003-04: $4 59; 2004-05:$ 410; 2005-06:$4.46; 2007- 08: $ 766; 2008- 09: $5.20.


Did you see the one about

September 23, 2010

Same planet, different world Oswald Bastable on bookless homes.

Mapping internet sensation stereotpypes – Lucia Maria has found some new world wit.

Muppets in blue goNZo Freakpower casts the blue end of the blogosphere as Muppets.

How did the poor come to be poor – Anti Dismal on why understanding wealth matters more than understanding poverty.

Building inpsectors – Credo Quia Absurdum Est on why practical experience beats the a bloke with a folder.

Reaching Atip – Cactus Kate explains fashion week.

Be careful Gareth – Patrick Smellie on the fine line between integrity and hubris.


Fresh start with water good start

September 23, 2010

New Zealand has plenty of water but not all of it’s in the right place at the right time; and not all of it is as clean as it should be.

The need for better management of water is clear, the best way to do it is somewhat less so, but the Land and Water Forum’s report, A Fresh Start for Water, is a good place to start.

It was welcomed by Agriculture Minister David Carter and Environment Minister Nick Smith.

“The Land and Water Forum has achieved a first in New Zealand – consensus on a way forward for managing freshwater,” Dr Smith said.

“The Government initiated this collaborative process because the long term success of future water policies relies on broad agreement at a national level. Improving water management is one of the Government’s top environmental and economic priorities. Finding durable solutions to issues of water quality, allocation and storage are essential to a healthy environment and our long-term economic progress.

“All 58 groups associated with the Land and Water Forum, led by its Chair Alastair Bisley, are to be congratulated for the report. Water is such a complex and polarising issue and to reach agreement is a major achievement.”

Getting 58 groups with a diverse range of views to collaborate let alone reach agreement on a report is amazing.

The report says:

It is in all our interests to maintain and improve the quality of freshwater in New Zealand, including instream values. For that we need limits, standards and targets in line with national needs, values and objectives which are applied taking account of the needs, values and objectives of communities. They must address contaminants and flows.

 Setting limits will require us to address degradation in some areas, but will enable more resource use in others. Limits need to be clear enough to achieve certainty, but able to be adapted in the face of new information and new technology development.

It recommends the adoption of a standards framework which:

Stems from a strategic view of water for New Zealand

• Defines national objectives for the environmental state of our water bodies and the overall timeframes within which to achieve them through National Policy Statements (NPS’s) and National Environmental Standards (NES’s) made under the Resource Management Act (RMA)

• Requires regions to give effect to this national framework at regional to catchment (or sub-catchment) level taking into account the spatial variation in biophysical characteristics of their water bodies and their current state

• Within that framework, requires regions to engage communities, including iwi, about the ways in which their water bodies are valued, and to work collaboratively with relevant land and water users and interested parties to set catchment-specific targets, standards and limits

• Maintains regional councils’ control of the use of land for the purpose of the maintenance and enhancement of the quality of water in water bodies and the maintenance of the quantity of water in water bodies and coastal water.

Federated Farmers’ co-spokesman on water issues Lachlan McKenzie says:

The report signals greater use of collaborative processes in water policy-making and implementation at national, local and catchment levels.

“For farmers, this is actually great news because involving landowners in any process is essential where policy outcomes could directly affect their property and what they can do with their land.  Given this, it’s only fair and right landowners take charge of implementing any changes that may result.

“Real progress also starts with decision making and how communities are informed.  Above all else, how the resourcefulness and innovative capacity of New Zealanders to develop local solutions will be tapped into.

“On-farm, farmers have to look at stock and effluent management systems tailored to location, including fencing waterways where practical.  Reducing our effluent disposal risks will lead to better nutrient utilisation and increased pasture growth.

No-one is denying that some farm practices can, and do, degrade waterways. What is often overlooked is that rural people have a personal interest in the quality and quantity of fresh water because the rivers we neighbour provide water for our farms and our homes.

“Yet some activists conveniently seem to look through the impact of New Zealand’s third most numerous large mammal, Homosapien.  This is not a ‘them and us’ blame culture that has coloured perception, but a realisation that we all rely on the environment.

Pollution from human and industrial waste is an issue which needs to be addressed too.

“Collaboration is a useful process that can result in more enduring and widely accepted outcomes, while saving significant amounts of money and time.

“Collaboration, like consultation however, does not equal agreement and there has not been agreement on all the issues identified in the report.

Feds took part in the forum but hasn’t signed up to the report because it wants to consult farmers on the recommendations and get feedback first.

The government is also waiting for feedback.

The report is a good start but there’s a long way to go before it turns into concrete policy.

Water New Zealand’s response is here.

Forest & Bird’s response is here.


When politics get personal

September 23, 2010

Chris Carter must really hate Phil Goff.

Just when attention was on Act and David Garrett, Carter returned to work Wellington, went to parliament, though didn’t grace the House with his presence:

 Mr Carter said he was back only to sort out his office, and would not be going to the House. A medical note from his doctor gave him leave until the end of the month, and he would return officially on October 5.

He still considered himself a Labour MP. “My dispute is with Phil Goff and not the Labour Party.”

However, Act’s respite will be temporary. Garrett is going to reveal all today.

When politics gets personal like this the biggest losers will be the parties.


September 23 in history

September 23, 2010

On September 23:

480 BC  Euripides, Greek playwright, was born (d. 406 BC).

 

1122  Concordat of Worms.

 

1215 Kublai Khan of the Mongol Empire, was born (d. 1294).

 
YuanEmperorAlbumKhubilaiPortrait.jpg

1409  Battle of Kherlen, the second significant victory over Ming China by the Mongols since 1368.

1459 Battle of Blore Heath, the first major battle of the English Wars of the Roses.

 1529  The Siege of Vienna began when Suleiman I attacked the city.

 

1641  The Merchant Royal, carrying a treasure worth over a billion USD, was lost at sea off Land’s End.

1779 American Revolution: a squadron commanded by John Paul Jones on board the USS Bonhomme Richard won the Battle of Flamborough Head, off the coast of England, against two British warships.

 
Serapis 9790.jpg

1803  Second Anglo-Maratha War: Battle of Assaye between the British East India Company and the Maratha Empire in India.

 
Battle of Assaye2.jpg

1821  Tripolitsa, Greece, fell and 30,000 Turks were massacred.

1846  Neptune was discovered by French astronomer Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier and British astronomer John Couch Adams;  then  verified by German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle.

Neptune from Voyager 2 

1857 The Russian warship Lefort capsised and sank during a storm in the Gulf of Finland, killing all 826 aboard.

1868 Grito de Lares (“Lares Revolt”) in Puerto Rico against Spanish rule.

Manuel Rojas drawing.jpg

1869  Mary Mallon, also known as Typhoid Mary, first carrier of typhoid, was born (d. 1938).

 

1880 John Boyd Orr, Scottish physician, Nobel Laureate, was born (d. 1971).

1887 Ngati Tuwharetoa gifted the mountain tops of Tongariro, Ngauruhoe and Ruapehu to the Crown.

Tongariro mountains gifted to Crown

1889  Nintendo Koppai (Later Nintendo Company, Limited) was founded by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce and market the playing card game Hanafuda.

 

1905  Norway and Sweden signed the “Karlstad treaty”, peacefully dissolving the Union between the two countries.

1908  University of Alberta was founded.

1909  The Phantom of the Opera (original title: Le Fantôme de l’Opéra), a novel by French writer Gaston Leroux, was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois.

Phantom of the Opera Cover.jpg

1920 Mickey Rooney, American actor, was born.

 

1922 In Washington D. C., Charles Evans Hughes signed the Hughes-Peynado agreement, that ended the occupation of Dominican Republic by the United States.

 

1930 Ray Charles, American musician, was born (d. 2004).

 

1932  The Kingdom of Hejaz and Nejd was renamed the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

1938 Mobilization of the Czechoslovak army in response to the Munich Crisis.

1939  Henry Blofeld, English cricket commentator, was born.

1941 World War II: The first gas chamber experiments were conducted at Auschwitz.

1942  World War II: First day of the September Matanikau action on Guadalcanal as United States Marine Corps forces attacked Imperial Japanese Army units along the Matanikau River.

 
GuadPatrol.jpg

1943 Julio Iglesias, Spanish singer, was born.

1943  World War II: The so-called Salò Republic, the Italian puppet state of Germany was born.

1944 Eric Bogle, British/Australian singer and songwriter, was born.

1949 Bruce Springsteen, American singer and songwriter, was born.

1952 Richard Nixon made his “Checkers speech“.

Checkers speech.jpg
 

1954  Cherie Blair, lawyer and politician, wife of ex-British PM.

 

1959   Iowa farmer Roswell Garst hosted Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev.

1959  The MS Princess of Tasmania, Australia’s first passenger roll-on/roll-off diesel ferry, made her maiden voyage across Bass Strait.

 

1962  The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City opened with the completion of the first building, the Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall) home of the New York Philharmonic.

 

1973  Juan Perón returned to power in Argentina.

 

1983  Gerrie Coetzee of South Africa became the first African boxing world heavyweight champion.

1983  Gulf Air Flight 771 was bombed, killing all 117 people on board.

1992 A large Provisional Irish Republican Army bomb destroyed the forensic laboratories in Belfast.

1999  NASA announced that it had lost contact with the Mars Climate Orbiter.

 

1999  Qantas Flight 1 overran the runway in Bangkok during a storm.

 

2002  The first public version of the web browser Mozilla Firefox (“Phoenix 0.1”) was released.

Mozilla Firefox IconMozilla Firefox wordmark

2004  Hurricane Jeanne: At least 1,070 in Haiti were reported killed by floods.

 

2008  Kauhajoki school shooting: Matti Saari killed 10 people before committing suicide.

Sourced from NZ History Online


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