The Parent Trap

August 17, 2010

Happy birthday Maureen O’Hara, 90 today.


Word of the day

August 17, 2010

Callipygia – shapely buttocks (from ancient Greek).


Tuesday’s answers

August 17, 2010

Monday’s questions were:

1. What do we use the masseter,  temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid  for?

2. Who said: “Wit has truth in it; wisecracking is simply calisthenics with words.”?

3. What colour is eau-de-nil?

4. It’s arco iris in Spanish, arcobaleno in Italian, regenboog in Dutch, arc-en-ciel in French and aniwaniwa or kopere in Maori – what is it in English?

5. Where is New Zealand’s largest earth dam and what is it called?

Busy day – no time to work out who got what, you’ll have to mark yourselves.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:.

Read the rest of this entry »


Did you see the one about . . .

August 17, 2010

Bookworm – creative photography at Mila’s Daydreams. (Hat tip: Beaties Book Blog).

I love my job – RivettingKate Taylor on the joys of her work.

The blogosphere prevails – Zen Tiger marks his 1000th post at New Zealand Conservative with some thoughts on blogging (a bit late with this one).

It’s inappropriate to be judgemental – Karl du Fresne on the ubiquitous prissy euphemism.

Round numbers are over rated: celebrating 191 posts – Darcy Cowan at Sci Blogs does the numbers.

Myths of socialism # 1 – Macdoctor in the first of a series countering the left’s mistakes.


Little things are big things

August 17, 2010

A reading often used at wedding includes the line: the little things are the big things.

That is at least as applicable to politics as marriage.

A pair of underpants played a major role in Tuku Morgan’s undoing. I have no idea how Len Brown runs the city he’s mayor of but I know far more than I want or need to about his coffee habit.

Yet Phillip Field hung on for months in the face of charges which eventually led to his conviction for corruption and Winston Peters clung on to the baubles of power with major questions over his behaviour and trustworthiness.

Perhaps the little things are the big thing because we can all relate to them, our own lives are full of them.

That could be one of the reasons the media focuses on what might seem to be very minor matters while giving at best cursory attention to major ones.

But little things are often silly things for which to risk losing a lot.

While never condoning major wrong doing, we might understand how someone thought a big gain was worth the risk. It’s much harder to understand why people risk their reputations and maybe even their careers over trifling expenditure which they could well afford themselves.


August 17 in history

August 17, 2010

On August 17:

986  A Byzantine army was destryed in the Battle of Gates of Trajan by the Bulgarians under the Comitopuli Samuel and Aron.

Trayanovi-vrata-left-arch-3.JPG

1786 – Davy Crockett, American frontiersman and soldier, was born (d. 1836).

1807  Robert Fulton‘s first American steamboat left New York City for Albany, New York on the Hudson River, inaugurating the first commercial steamboat service in the world.

 

1839 The NZ Company’s sailing ship Tory dropped anchor in Queen Charlotte Sound to pick up fresh water, food and wood before proceeding to Port Nicholson (Wellington Harbour).

NZ Company ship Tory arrives

1862  Indian Wars: The Lakota (Sioux) Dakota War of 1862 began as Lakota warriors attacked white settlements along the Minnesota River.

 
The Siege of New Ulm Minn.jpg

1864  American Civil War: Battle of Gainesville – Confederate forces defeated Union troops.

1883  The first public performance of the Dominican Republic’s national anthem, Himno Nacional.

1893  Mae West, American actress, was born (d. 1980).

1904 Mary Cain, American newspaper editor and politician, was born  (d. 1984).

1907  Pike Place Market, the longest continuously-running public farmers market in the US, opened in Seattle.

 

1908  Fantasmagorie, the first animated cartoon, realized by Émile Cohl, was shown in Paris.

 

1914  Battle of Stalluponen – The German army of General Hermann von François defeated the Russian force commanded by Pavel Rennenkampf near modern-day Nesterov, Russia.

 

1915  Jewish American Leo Frank was lynched for the alleged murder of a 13-year-old girl in Marietta, Georgia.

 

1918  Bolshevik revolutionary leader Moisei Uritsky was assassinated.

 

1920  Maureen O’Hara, Irish actress, was born.

1943 Robert De Niro, American actor, was born.

1943  The U.S. Eighth Air Force suffered the loss of 60 bombers on the Schweinfurt-Regensburg mission.

 
B-17F formation over Schweinfurt, Germany, August 17, 1943.jpg

1943 : The U.S. Seventh Army under General George S. Patton arrived in Messina, Italy, followed several hours later by the British 8th Army under Field Marshal Bernard L. Montgomery, completing the Allied conquest of Sicily.

1943 First Québec Conference of Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and William Lyon Mackenzie King began.

 

1944 Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle Corporation, billionaire, was born.

1945  Indonesian Declaration of Independence.

 

1946 Martha Coolidge, American film director, was born.

1947 The Radcliffe Line, the border between Union of India and Dominion of Pakistan was revealed.

 

1953   First meeting of Narcotics Anonymous in Southern California.

1959  Quake Lake was formed by the magnitude 7.5 1959 Yellowstone earthquake near Hebgen Lake in Montana.

1959  Kind of Blue by Miles Davis the much acclaimed and highly influential best selling jazz recording of all time, was released.

 

1960  Gabon gained independence from France.

1960 Sean Penn, American actor and director, was born.

1962  Gilby Clarke, American musician (Guns N’ Roses), was born.

1962  East German border guards killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter as he attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into West Berlin becoming one of the first victims of the wall.

 

1969  Category 5 Hurricane Camille hit the Mississippi coast, killing 248 people and causing $1.5 billion in damage.

1970  Venera 7 launched.

1978  Double Eagle II became first balloon to cross the Atlantic Ocean when it landed in Miserey near Paris, 137 hours after leaving Presque Isle, Maine.

 

1979 Two Soviet Aeroflot jetliners collide in mid-air over Ukraine, killing 156

1980  Azaria Chamberlain disappearsed, probably taken by a dingo.

1982  The first Compact Discs (CDs) were released to the public in Germany.

 
Compact disc.svg

1988  Pakistani President Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq and U.S. Ambassador Arnold Raphel are killed in a plane crash.

 

1998  Monica Lewinsky scandal: US President Bill Clinton admitted in taped testimony that he had an “improper physical relationship” with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. On the same day he admitted before the nation that he “misled people” about his relationship.

1999 A 7.4-magnitude earthquake struck İzmit, Turkey, killing more than 17,000 and injuring 44,000.

2004  The National Assembly of Serbia unanimously adopted new state symbols: Boze Pravde becomes the new anthem and the coat of arms was adopted for the whole country.

 
Coat of arms of Serbia.svg

2005 The first forced evacuation of settlers, as part of the Israel unilateral disengagement plan, starts.

Israel with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights 

2005  Over 500 bombs were set off by terrorists at 300 locations in 63 out of the 64 districts of Bangladesh.

2008  By winning the Men’s 4x100m medley relay, Michael Phelps became the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in the same Olympics.

 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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