Employment law changes neither anti-worker nor anti-union

Dear Helen Kelly,

Re: the  letter you wrote to Prime Minister John Key:

On the issues – we oppose them. They show a disregard for the working people of this country. They paint a picture of workers as lazy, untrustworthy skivers, that are out of control and need to be disciplined. Workers are painted as acting deceitfully when applying for positions (so 90 days are important) taking sickies, misusing union membership and a range of other generalisations that demean the people we work with every day. Employers on the other hand are painted as generally fair minded people that will use all powers reasonably.

On the contrary, the proposed changes are a mild rebalancing of employment law which paints a picture of employers as slave-driving, untrustworthy bullies who are out of control and need to be disciplined. Employers are painted as acting deceitfully when employing people (the 90 days trial for smaller businesses hasn’t been the disaster you and other unions feared), who will demand sick-notes for every absence, hate unions and a range of other generalisations that demean the people who work hard to provide jobs for people every day. Employees on the other hand are painted as generally fair minded people who will use all rights reasonably.

Apart from the slur on working people this analysis disregards the fact that many employers are not “fair minded individuals” but corporate entities that employ CEOs and managers to maximise profit.

Apart from the slur on employers this analysis disregards the fact that the majority (I think it’s 90%) of New Zealand businesses are small to medium enterprises employing fewer than 10 people. Maximising profits is sensible practice which makes the business and jobs more secure and enables employers to offer improved pay and conditions for staff.

 We work with global corporate entities in this country who comply with a wide range of minimum standards and regulations which make their work practices decent here. These same corporates work in unregulated economies employing people under atrocious conditions.

Ms Kelly, you can’t use employment law in New Zealand to fight the global war on capitalism.

You might however, try to understand to see that the measures the government is proposing help employers take on new workers and make workplaces better for existing staff who suffer if another worker doesn’t fit in or work well.

You might also admit that unrestricted access to workplaces has been abused by some union representatives.  The Inquiring Mind has a good example of this.

You may not believe that employers like happy workplaces for their own sake, but surely you can see they have a vested interest in ensuring their workers are happy because that helps productivity.

You however, have a vested interest in unsettling and upsetting workers because that will help you increase membership.

You sound like you’ve come to believe your own rhetoric which has turned a small employer-friendly molehill into a worker and union hating mountain. That’s not good for employers or the people they employ.

7 Responses to Employment law changes neither anti-worker nor anti-union

  1. david winter says:

    Apart from the slur on employers this analysis disregards the fact that the majority (I think it’s 90%) of New Zealand businesses are small to medium enterprise

    That statistic gets bandied around a lot. But it’s meaningless.

    In general because the real question is how many people are employed by corporates, and specifically because the current debate is about extending the 90 days low to those people.

    Her next remark doesn’t seem like part of a idealogical war so much as a reminder that some of the same companies that treat people fairly in New Zealand don’t do the same in countries that don’t have protections for workers.

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  2. Homepaddock – how you can cite Helen’s paragraph as rhetoric and not see that the paragraph that follows, yours, is of the same ilk, amazes me.

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  3. homepaddock says:

    David -Fair point on the stats.

    But how does what companies do elsewhere justify making laws tougher here?

    Robert -Of course it was rhetoric, I was coppying her style, and some of her words, deliberately.

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  4. david winter says:

    It’s not so much that we should maker laws tougher here, just a reminder that if yo erode protections on workers then not every employer can be trusted to be a good guy, and given the opportunity some of them will treat their workers poorly.

    (I actually don’t know that corporates in NZ have a bad record outside of this country, but if they do then I think that’s something to remember when think about labour laws)

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  5. homepaddock – on Q&A, Kelly described her dismay at the betrayal of trust by John Key – personal trust and ‘professional’ trust. She was genuine, I believe, in saying that.
    I was reminded of the same betrayal of trust that Tuhoe negotiators described not so long ago.
    My conclusion?
    John Key is not trustworthy.

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  6. pdm says:

    Robert – how can you say that John Key has betrayed anyones trust with the 90 day legislation?

    As I recall National campaigned on this and are now keeping their word.

    Unlike their predeccessers who wiped out appeals to the Privy Council on an ideological whim without any suggestion that they would do so in the lead up to the election.

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  7. pdm – I didn’t. Helen Kelly said Key had betrayed her trust with his decision.
    My own conclusion as to Key’s untrustworthyness is based on far more than just this latest incident.
    As a matter of interest, can you link me to where the actions just taken were specifically described during National’s campaign?

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