Booing boors

June 26, 2010

The boors/bores who boo when the team they don’t support are taking kicks for penalties or conversions are unsporting and as irritating as the vuvuzelas.

If the All Blacks vs Wales doesn’t appeal Adam Smith is offering Saturday rock for those who prefer rock to rubgy. The show starts here.


Peaceful

June 26, 2010

Happy birthday Georgie Fame, 67 today.

I recognise the song but not this version, did someone else cover it?


IT vs Management

June 26, 2010

A man in a hot air balloon, realising he was lost, reduced altitude and spotted a woman below. He descended further and shouted to the lady “Excuse me, can you help me? I promised a friend I would meet him an hour ago, but I don’t know where I am”  

The woman below replied, “You’re in a hot air balloon, hovering approximately 30 feet above the ground. You’re between 40 and 41 degrees north latitude and between 59 and 60 degrees west longitude.”  

“You must be in IT,” said the balloonist.  

“Actually I am,” replied the woman, “How did you know?”  

“Well,” answered the balloonist, “everything you have told me is technically correct but I’ve no idea what to make of your information and the fact is I’m still lost. Frankly, you’ve not been much help at all. If anything, you’ve delayed my trip.”  

The woman below responded, “You must be in Management.”  

“I am,” replied the balloonist, “but how did you know?”  

“Well,” said the woman, “you don’t know where you are or where you’re going. You have risen to where you are due to a large quantity of hot air. You made a promise, which you’ve no idea how to keep, and you expect people beneath you to solve your problems. The fact is you are in exactly the same position you were in before we met, but now, somehow, it’s my *&##*  fault…”


Did you see the one about . . .

June 26, 2010

 Going post-espresso with Chemex – Half Pie takes a scientific approach to coffee.

The tyrrany of power point – Alison Campbell at Sciblogs on the pluses and minuses of technological assistance in communication.

All White on the Night – Opposable Thumb takes us down several pegs.

Blocking out the still small voice – NZ Conservative on the necessity of boredom and also Churchill become non-smoker via air brush –  fags (of the tobacco kind) are censored but S&M isn’t.

The decline of civilisation – Not PC on questions. While there Roll it experimental housing- University of Karlsruhe is also worth a look.

A blog of one’s own – Schroedinger’s Tabby turns two.

Public Opinion – Quote Unquote on modern media.

Houston we have . . . . a lot of snow – Laughy Kate reports on gameshow recruits.

 At the end of the earth  Latitude 44 muses on cultural identity


Quote of the day

June 26, 2010

Australian political scientists are petitioning for the introduction of new unit of time; the Rudd. It has an uncertain half life, but almost never lasts as long as you think it will. . .

. . . Congratulations, Australia. Your main female role model politician is no longer Pauline Hanson. You might become civilised yet.

You can read the rest at  GoNZo Freakpower.


Would-be weka farmer wins Agri-Personality of Year

June 26, 2010

Roger Beattie is the Federated Farmers’  2010 Agri-Personality of the Year.

 Roger Beattie is an eco-anarchist combining conservation with business acumen. Roger is passionate about endangered species, but believes commercial farming is a better model for long term survival. His interview on Close-Up with DoC’s Al Morrison of the status quo versus farming weka, saw 83 percent of viewers side with Roger.  Roger has also rescued a flock of wild Pitt Island sheep with a plan to selling them as a gourmet food product.  His latest victory against bureaucracy is the commercialisation of Undaria – an invasive Japanese kelp used in soups and salads overseas.  After a ten year fight he finally got the greenlight to start an industry that, in five years could be worth $10 million a year.   Roger is also the force behind Eyris Blue Pearls – Paua Pearls – exported around the world. 

The Agri Business Person of the Year is Graeme Harrison, founder and chair of ANZCO Foods.

Graeme created ANZCO foods in Japan in 1984, returning to New Zealand nine years later to lead the company’s subsequent growth. Today, ANZCO has annual sales of more than $1.2 billion and employs 2,800 people on 11 production sites within New Zealand and has sales and marketing offices in Japan, Taiwan, North America, the UK and Belgium. Graeme’s vision for the future has been key in ensuring ANZCO’s past and future success and this is evident in the company’s ongoing focus in increasing investment in downstream manufacturing. This includes food solutions, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and food flavourings.  Right through the process of ANZCO’s growth as a company, Graeme has shown leadership, vision and innovation and this has ensured that the business has been extremely successful.

This is the second year Federated Farmers has run the Cream of the Crop awards which Feds president Don Nicolson said gives the organisation the opportunity to celebrate how good farmers are.

The awards were sponsored by Ravensdown whose chair Bill McLeod was one of the judges.

 Other judges were Invercargill Mayor, Tim Shadbolt, farming and All Blacks legend, Sir Brian Lochore, Cathy Quinn, the Auckland based chair of law firm, Minter Ellison Rudd Watts and 2010 Veuve Clicquot businesswoman of the year and Southland netball coach, Robyn Broughton.


June 26 in history

June 26, 2010

363  Roman Emperor Julian was killed during the retreat from the Sassanid Empire. General Jovian was proclaimed Emperor by the troops on the battlefield.

JulianusII-antioch(360-363)-CNG.jpg

 

1284  The legendary Pied Piper led 130 children out of Hamelin.

 

1409 Western Schism: the Roman Catholic church was led into a double schism as Petros Philargos was crowned Pope Alexander V after the Council of Pisa, joining Pope Gregory XII in Rome and Pope Benedict XII in Avignon.

 

1483  Richard III was crowned king of England.

 

1541  Francisco Pizarro was assassinated in Lima by the son of his former companion and later antagonist, Diego Almagro the younger.

1718  Tsarevich Alexei Petrovich of Russia, Peter the Great’s son, mysteriously died after being sentenced to death by his father for plotting against him.

 

1723  After a siege and bombardment by cannon, Baku surrendered to the Russians.

1817 Branwell Bronte, British painter and poet, was born (d. 1848).

 

1848 End of the June Days Uprising in Paris.

 

1857  The first investiture of the Victoria Cross in Hyde Park.

A bronze cross pattée bearing the crown of Saint Edward surmounted by a lion with the inscription FOR VALOUR. A crimson ribbon is attached

1866 George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon, English financier of Egyptian excavations, was born (d. 1923).

1870  Christmas was declared a federal holiday in the United States.

1892 Pearl S. Buck, American writer, Nobel laureate, was born (d. 1973).

 

1898 Willy Messerschmitt, German aircraft designer, was born (d. 1978).

 

1908 Salvador Allende, Former President of Chile (1970-1973), was born (d. 1973)

 

1909  Colonel Tom Parker, Elvis Presley’s manager, was born (d. 1997)

1909  The Science Museum in London became an independent entity.

 

1913 Maurice Wilkes, British computer scientist, was born.

1914 Laurie Lee, British writer, was born (d. 1997).

1917  The first U.S. troops arrived in France to fight alongside the allies in World War I.

1918  The Australian steamer Wimmera was sunk by a mine laid the year before by the German raider Wolf north of Cape Maria van Diemen.

<em>Wimmera</em> sunk by German mine

1918  World War I, Western Front: Battle for Belleau Wood – Allied Forces under John J. Pershing and James Harbord defeated Imperial German Forces under Wilhelm, German Crown Prince.

Scott Belleau Wood.jpg

1921 Violette Szabo, French WWII secret agent, was born (d. 1945).

Violette Szabo

1924 American occupying forces left the Dominican Republic.

1927 – The Cyclone roller coaster opened on Coney Island.

Coney-island-cyclone-usgs-photo.jpg

1934  President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Federal Credit Union Act, which establishes credit unions.

1936  Initial flight of the Focke-Wulf Fw 61, the first practical helicopter.

1940 Billy Davis, Jr., American singer (The 5th Dimension), was born.

The 5th Dimension. From left: Townson, LaRue, Davis, McCoo, and McLemore.

1940 World War II: under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, the Soviet Union presented an ultimatum to Romania requiring it to cede Bessarabia and the northern part of Bukovina.

 
MolotovRibbentropStalin.jpg

1942  The first flight of the Grumman F6F Hellcat.

1943 Georgie Fame, British singer, was born.

1945  The United Nations Charter was signed in San Francisco.

United Nations Charter with the Egyptian delegation at the signing ceremony in San Francisco.jpg

1948 – William Shockley filed the original patent for the grown junction transistor, the first bipolar junction transistor.

 

1948 Shirley Jackson‘s short story The Lottery was published in The New Yorker magazine.

Lotteryart.jpg

1952 The Pan-Malayan Labour Party was founded, as a union of statewise labour parties.

Labour Party of Malaya logo.png

1959  The Saint Lawrence Seaway opened, opening North America’s Great Lakes to ocean-going ships.

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1960 The former British Protectorate of British Somaliland gained its independence as Somaliland .

 

1960 – Madagascar gained its independence from France.

1963  John F. Kennedy spoke the famous words “Ich bin ein Berliner” on a visit to West Berlin.

 

1973  At Plesetsk Cosmodrome 9 people were killed in an explosion of a Cosmos 3-M rocket.

1974  The Universal Product Code was scanned for the first time to sell a package of Wrigley’s chewing gum at the Marsh Supermarket in Troy, Ohio.

 

1975  Indira Gandhi established emergency rule in India.

 

1975 – Two FBI agents and a member of the American Indian Movement were killed in a shootout on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

1976  The CN Tower, the world’s tallest free-standing structure on land, was opened to general public.

 
Toronto's CN Tower.

1977 The Yorkshire Ripper killed 16 year old shop assistant Jayne MacDonald in Leeds, changing public perception of the killer as she is the first victim who was not a prostitute.

1978Air Canada Flight 189 to Toronto overran the runway and crashed into the Etobicoke Creek ravine. Two of 107 passengers on board died.

1991  Ten-Day War: the Yugoslav people’s army began the Ten-Day War in Slovenia.

Jna t-55 slovenia.jpg

1993 The United States launched a missile attack targeting Baghdad intelligence headquarters in retaliation for a thwarted assassination attempt against former President George H.W. Bush in April in Kuwait.

1994  Microsoft no longer supported MS-DOS and the development of FreeDOS began.

FreeDOS-1.0-LiveCD-Boot.png

1995  Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani deposed his father Khalifa bin Hamad al-Thani, as the Emir of Qatar, in a bloodless coup.

Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani.jpg

1996  Irish Journalist Veronica Guerin was shot in her car while in traffic in the outskirts of Dublin.

Veronica Guerin 1.jpg

1997nThe U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Communications Decency Act violated the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

2003  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Lawrence v. Texas that gender-based sodomy laws were unconstitutional.

2008 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protected an individual right, and that the District of Columbia handgun ban was unconstitutional.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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