It’s Alright

June 23, 2010

Happy birthday Adam Faith would have been 70 today.


Tell Me How

June 23, 2010

Niki Sullivan would have been 73 today.


Blogging on a paper on blogging

June 23, 2010

A few weeks ago I received an email from a journalist, Pattie Pegler,  asking if I was prepared to be interviewed for a story on blogging.

I was and the story which resulted, expanding world of the blogosphere was published yesterday.

It concludes with what people look for in a blog:  first and foremost, original and interesting content.


Lack of responsibility may lead to restrictions

June 23, 2010

Russel Norman had the right to protest when Chinese vice-president Xi Jinping entered parliament last week.

But he also had a responsibility to do so in a manner befitting his status as an MP.

He was able to get much closer to the VP than the general public because he’s an MP, but he abused that right by not exercising it responsibly.

As a result John Key is seeking a security review  and Speaker, Lockwood Smith, is looking at new rules to govern protests by MPs..

Oh the irony, a protest against a lack of democracy in Tibet may lead to more restrictions here.


Critical Mass

June 23, 2010

MacDoctor, Laughy Kate and A Cat of Impossible Colour were the blogs I chose for my spot on Critical Mass  yesterday.

Macdoctor has a winning prescription for posts on health, blue-tinged politics and life.

He writes clearly and cleverly, is rational reasoned and witty.

Laughy Kate specialises in short, snappy posts which show an appreciation of life’s quirkier side.

A Cat of Impossible Colour  is a delightful mix of fashion – of the thrifted kind – her writing, her cat and life in general. If her novel – due out next year – is anything like her blog it will be a wonderful read.

My Critical Mass spot is usually every two or three weeks. But as Noelle McCarthy, who alternates with me in speaking about the internet,  is standing in for Jim Mora and can’t interview herself today’s was only a week after the last one when I discussed the Air New Zealand Best Blog Awards.


10/15

June 23, 2010

Just adequate: 10/15 in this week’s Dominion Post political trivia quiz – and that was with some guesses.

It didn’t help that I didn’t help that I didn’t know any of the characters from Grease.


June 23 in history

June 23, 2010

On June 23:

47 BC Pharaoh Ptolemy XV Caesarion of Egypt was born  (d. 30 BC).

Denderah3 Cleopatra Cesarion.jpg

79 Titus Caesar Vespasianus succeeded his father Vespasianus as tenth Roman Emperor.

Tito, testa in marmo da Pantelleria.jpg

1180 First Battle of Uji, starting the Genpei War in Japan.

Genpei kassen.jpg

1305 The FlemishFrench peace treaty was signed at Athis-sur-Orge.

1314  First War of Scottish Independence The Battle of Bannockburn, south of Stirling, began.

Bannockburn.jpg

1532  Henry VIII and François I signed a secret treaty against Emperor Charles V.

1565  Turgut Reis (Dragut), commander of the Ottoman navy, died during the Siege of Malta.

Turgut Reis Admiral.JPG

1611  The mutinous crew of Henry Hudson‘s fourth voyage set Henry, his son and seven loyal crew members adrift in an open boat in what is now Hudson Bay; they were never heard from again.

 

1661  Marriage contract between Charles II of England and Catherine of Braganza.

Seated man of thin build with chest-length curly black hair 

1683  William Penn signed friendship treaty with Lenni Lenape Indians in Pennsylvania.

1713  The French residents of Acadia were given one year to declare allegiance to Britain or leave Nova Scotia.

1757 Battle of Plassey – 3,000 British troops under Robert Clive defeated a 50,000 strong Indian army under Siraj Ud Daulah at Plassey.

Clive.jpg

1758  Seven Years’ War: Battle of Krefeld – British forces defeated French troops at Krefeld in Germany.

1760 – Seven Years’ War: Battle of Landeshut – Austria defeated Prussia.

1780 American Revolution: Battle of Springfield.

Battle of Springfield NJ 1780.jpg

1794  Empress Catherine II of Russia granted Jews permission to settle in Kiev.

1810  John Jacob Astor formed the Pacific Fur Company.

1812  War of 1812: Great Britain revoked the restrictions on American commerce, thus eliminating one of the chief reasons for going to war.

1812 – Napoleonic Wars: Napoleon I of France invadesd Russia.

1860  The United States Congress established the Government Printing Office.

1865  American Civil War: At Fort Towson in the Oklahoma Territory, Confederate Brigadier General Stand Watie surrendered the last significant rebel army.

Stand Watie.jpg

1868  Christopher Latham Sholes receivesd a patent for Type-Writer.

 

1887 The Rocky Mountains Park Act became law in Canada, creating the nation’s first national park, Banff National Park.

 

1894 King Edward VIII was born (d. 1972).

Young clean-shaven man in military uniform

1894  The International Olympic Committee was founded at the Sorbonne, at the initiative of Baron Pierre de Coubertin.

1914  Mexican Revolution: Francisco Villa took Zacatecas from Victoriano Huerta.

Pancho villa horseback.jpg

 

 

1917  In a game against the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox pitcher Ernie Shore retired 26 batters in a row after replacing Babe Ruth, who had been ejected for punching the umpire.

1919  Estonian Liberation War: The decisive defeat of German Freikorps (Baltische Landeswehr) forces in the Battle of Cesis (Võnnu lahing). This day is celebrated as Victory Day in Estonia.

1926 The College Board administered the first SAT exam.

1931 Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from Roosevelt Field, Long Island in an attempt to circumnavigate the world in a single-engine plane.

 

1937  Niki Sullivan, American guitarist (The Crickets), was born  (d. 2004) .

 

 

1938 The Civil Aeronautics Act was signed into law, forming the Civil Aeronautics Authority in the United States.

 

1940 Adam Faith, English singer and actor was born, (d 2003).

1940 Stuart Sutcliffe, English musician (The Beatles) , was born (d. 1962).

 

1940 – World War II: German leader Adolf Hitler surveys newly defeated Paris in now occupied France.

1941 Roger McDonald, Australian author, was born.

1941 The Lithuanian Activist Front declared independence from the Soviet Union and formed the Provisional Government of Lithuania.

1942 World War II: The first selections for the gas chamber at Auschwitz took place on a train load of Jews from Paris.

 

1942  World War II: Germany’s latest fighter, a Focke-Wulf FW190 was captured intact when it mistakenly landsedat RAF Pembrey in Wales.

1943  World War II: The British destroyers HMS Eclipse and HMS Laforey sank the Italian submarine Ascianghi in the Mediterranean after she torpedoes the cruiser HMS Newfoundland.

RSMG Adua

1945 World War II: The Battle of Okinawa ended when organised resistance of Imperial Japanese Army forces collapsed.

 

1946  The 1946 Vancouver Island earthquake struck Vancouver Island.

 

1947  The United States Senate followsedthe United States House of Representatives in overriding U.S. President Harry Truman’s veto of the Taft-Hartley Act.

1956  Gamal Abdel Nasser was elected president of Egypt.

Head and shoulders of a man in his forties smiling. He has dark hair that is pulled back, a long forehead, thick eyebrows and a mustache.  He is wearing a gray jacket and a white shirt with a tie.

1958  The Dutch Reformed Church accepted women ministers.

 

1959  Convicted Manhattan Project spy Klaus Fuchs was released after only nine years in prison and allowed to emigrate to Dresden.

1959  A fire in a resort hotel in Stalheim, Norway killed 34 people.

1961 Cold War: The Antarctic Treaty, which set aside Antarctica as a scientific preserve and banned military activity on the continent, came into force after the opening date for signature set for the December 1, 1959.

Antarctica, territorial claims.svg

1965 Paul Arthurs, British guitarist (Oasis), was born.

 Oasis, 1997. L-R: Alan White, Paul McGuigan, Noel Gallagher, Paul Arthurs, and Liam Gallagher.

1967  Cold War: U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson met with Soviet Premier Aleksei Kosygin in Glassboro, New Jersey for the three-day Glassboro Summit Conference.

1968  74 were killed and 150 injured in a football stampede towards a closed exit in a Buenos Aires stadium.

1969 Warren E. Burger was sworn in as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court by retiring chief justice Earl Warren.

 

1972  Watergate Scandal: U.S. President Richard M. Nixon and White House chief of staff H. R. Haldeman were taped talking about using the Central Intelligence Agency to obstruct the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation into the Watergate break-ins.

1972 45 countries left the Sterling Area, allowing their currencies to fluctuate independently of the British Pound.

1973   The International Court of Justice condemned French nuclear tests in the Pacific.

World court condemns French nuclear tests

1973 A fire at a house in Hull, England, which killed a six year old boy was passed off as an accident; it later emerged as the first of 26 deaths by fire caused over the next seven years by arsonist Peter Dinsdale.

1985  A terrorist bomb aboard Air India flight 182 brought the Boeing 747 down off the coast of Ireland, killing all 329 aboard.

1988 James E. Hansen testified to the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources that it is 99% probable that global warming had begun.

1989 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a law passed by the U.S. Congress banning all sexually oriented phone message services was unconstitutional.

1991 Moldova declared independence.

Sourced from NZ History Online & WIkipedia


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