Wonderful Tonight

30/03/2010

Happy birthday Eric Clapton – 65 today.


Go Now

30/03/2010

Happy birthday Graeme Edge – 69 today.


8/10

30/03/2010

NZ History Online didn’t do a quiz last week but this week’s is up .

I got 8/10 (partly knowledge, partly lucky guesses).


Tie Me Kangaroo Down Sport

30/03/2010

Happy birthday Rolf Harris – 80 today.

Singing here with The Beatles in a version of Time Me Kangaroo Down Sport I’d not come across before.

If you prefer a more traditional version, try: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lofgud4wLLo


Tuesday’s answers

30/03/2010

Monday’s questions were:

1. Where would you find  adagio, con anima, forzando and tranquillo?

2. Who said: “Everything I eat has been proved by some doctor or other to be a deadly poison, and everything I don’t eat has been proved to be indispensable for life.  But I go marching on”? 

3. What is tempranillo?

4. Who said: “As a woman painter I work to represent love of humanity and faith in mankind in a world which is to me richly variable and infinitely beautiful”?

5. What does manumit  mean?

Mr Gronk got two right.

David got two and a bonus for extra information for #2.

Deborah got four right and earned a bonus for her car names.

Gravedodger got three right.

Rayinz goets the electronic flowers for getting all five right.

Andrei got four right and a bonus for translation.

Paul got three right and a bonus for lateral thinking/humour.

PDM got one and a bonus for honesty.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


80 years young

30/03/2010

Don was a widower farming up a no exit road with a son and daughter who weren’t interested in taking over from him.

He put the farm on the market, it sold and at the clearing sale he told my farmer to call him if he needed any tractor work done.

A couple of months later my farmer did need a tractor driver and gave Don a call. He said he couldn’t come that day but he’d be there first thing next morning and he was.

The original offer was for three days work. That was just over 20 years ago and he’s still working for us.

I’ve known him all my life because we’re distantly related – his grandfather and my great grandfather were cousins and my father worked for his parents when he first came out from Scotland in the 1930s.

Since he started working for us he’s become much more involved with our family and has accompanied us on three visits to Argentina to attend weddings. A photo  from one of those trips sums up his zest for life and popularity. He’s sitting on a lawn in his shorts with a glass of beer in his hand, surrounded by five bikini clad young women, all of whom are laughing. Don’s story is he was helping them with their English.

Today is his birthday – he’s a very young 80 and has no plans to retire.

He reckons he’s lucky to be working for us, we know we’re very lucky to have an employee, friend and family member like him.


Just $1 an hour

30/03/2010

Why should anyone work for just $1 an hour? the opponents to the government’s plans to work-test sickness beneficiaries are asking.

The answer is: is the abatement rates which impose a high marginal tax on extra income for all beneficiaries.

But if the benefit isn’t abated, beneficiaries would get more for part time work than some others would for fulltime work and that’s definitely neither fair nor right.

The problem isn’t that beneficiaries are working for just $1 an hour, it’s that they aren’t working for all the other dollars they get.

There are good reasons why some people need a benefit temporarily. There are good reasons why a few people will need a benefit permanently.

But getting those who are able to work in to work, albeit part time, is better than leaving them to do nothing on a benefit.

Working isn’t just about the money you earn, it’s about satisfaction, standing on your own feet, and requiring less from the public purse which frees up money for those who need it more.

It’s unfortunate but unavoidable that some beneficiaries may find they’re only $1 an hour better off than they would be if they weren’t working. But they won’t be working for only $1 an hour.

They’ll be working for all the dollars the taxpayer gives them plus the $1 an hour.

That’s better for them, better for the economy and better for society.


March 30 in history

30/03/2010

On March 30:

240 BC 1st recorded perihelion passage of Halley’s Comet.

A color image of Comet Halley, shown flying to the left aligned flat against the sky

1282 The people of Sicily rebelled against the Angevin KingCharles I, in what became known as the Sicilian Vespers.

Sicilian Vespers (1846), by Francesco Hayez

1296 Edward I sacksed Berwick-upon-Tweed, during armed conflict between Scotland and England.

A man in half figure with short, curly hair and a hint of beard is facing left. He wears a coronet and holds a sceptre in his right hand. He has a blue robe over a red tunic, and his hands are covered by white, embroidered gloves. His left hand seems to be pointing left, to something outside the picture.

1746 Francisco Goya, Spanish painter, was born.

1811 Robert Bunsen, German chemist, was born.

1814 Napoleonic Wars: Sixth Coalition forces marched into Paris.

1814 – Joachim Murat issued the Rimini Declaration which later inspired Italian Unification.

1820 Anna Sewell, British author, was born.

1842 Anesthesia was used for the first time in an operation by Dr Crawford Long.

1844 One of the most important battles of the Dominican War of Independence from Haiti took place near the city of Santiago de los Caballeros.

1853 Vincent van Gogh, Dutch painter, was born.

Impressionist portrait painting of a man with a reddish beard wearing a dark coat and white shirt while looking forward with his body facing left

1855 Origins of the American Civil War: Bleeding Kansas – “Border Ruffians” from Missouri invaded Kansas and forced election of a pro-slavery legislature.

1856 The Treaty of Paris was signed, ending the Crimean War.

 

1858 Hymen Lipman patented a pencil with an attached rubber.

 

1863 Danish prince Wilhelm Georg was chosen as King George of Greece.

1864 Franz Oppenheimer, German sociologist, was born.

 

1867 Alaska was purchased for $7.2 million, about 2 cent/acre ($4.19/km²), by United States Secretary of State William H. Seward. The media called this Seward’s Folly.

 

1870 Texas was readmitted to the Union following Reconstruction.

1885 The Battle for Kushka triggered the Pandjeh Incident which nearly gave rise to war between the British and Russian Empires.

1909 The Queensboro Bridge opened, linking Manhattan and Queens.

 

1910  The Mississippi Legislature founded The University of Southern Mississippi.

The University of Southern Mississippi Seal

1912 Sultan Abdelhafid signed the Treaty of Fez, making Morocco a French protectorate.

 

1913 Frankie Laine, American singer, was born.

1918 Outburst of bloody March Events in Baku and other locations of Baku Governorate.

1928 Tom Sharpe, English satirical author, was born.

 

1930 Rolf Harris, Australian artist and entertainer, was born.

1937 Warren Beatty, American actor and director, was born.

1939 The Heinkel He 100 fighter sets a world airspeed record of 463 mph.

1939 – First flight of the Australian C.A.C. CA-16 Wirraway.

 

1940 Sino-Japanese War: Japan declared Nanking to be the capital of a new Chinese puppet government, nominally controlled by Wang Ching-wei.

1941 Graeme Edge, British musician (Moody Blues), was born.

1945  Eric Clapton, British guitarist, was born.

1945 World War II: Soviet Union forces invaded Austria and took Vienna; Polish and Soviet forces liberated Gdańsk.

1945 – World War II: a defecting German pilot delivered a Messerschmitt Me 262A-1 to the Americans.

 

1949  A riot broke out in Austurvöllur square in Reykjavík, when Iceland joined NATO.

1950 Robbie Coltrane, Scottish actor and comedian, was born.

1954  Yonge Street subway line opened in Toronto, the first subway in Canada.

1959 Peter Hugh McGregor Ellis, who was convicted of child abuse at the Christchurch Civic Creche, was born.

1961  The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs was signed in New York.

 

1962 MC Hammer, American rap musician, was born.

1964 Tracy Chapman, American singer, was born,

1965 Vietnam War: A car bomb exploded in front of the US Embassy, Saigon, killing 22 and wounding 183 others.

1967 Fred Ladd flew a plane under Auckland Harbour Bridge.

Fred Ladd flies plane under Auckland Harbour Bridge

1968 Celine Dion, Canadian singer, was born.

1972  Vietnam War: The Easter Offensive began after North Vietnamese forces cross into the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) of South Vietnam.

T-59 VC.jpg
North

1979 Airey Neave, a British MP, was killed by a car bomb as left the Palace of Westminster. The Irish National Liberation Army claimed responsibility.

 

1979 Norah Jones, American musician, was born.

1979 First Gay Rights Parade held in Michigan.

1981 President Ronald Reagan was shot in the chest outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by John Hinckley, Jr.

 

1982 Space Shuttle programme: STS-3 Mission was completed with the landing of Columbia at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.

Sts3-patch.png

2006  The United Kingdom Terrorism Act 2006 becomes law.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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