True Love

March 6, 2010

Happy birthday Kiki Dee – 63 today.


Wish You Were Here

March 6, 2010

Happy birthday David Gilmour – 64 today.

I didn’t want to risk posting a Pink Floyd clip with out him so I’ve chosen a solo:


Home Sweet Home

March 6, 2010

Happy birthday Kiri Te Kanawa – 66 today – and happy anniversary New Zealand Symphony Orchestra which first performed 63 years ago today.


ECan offers compromise

March 6, 2010

Environment Canterbury has offered the government a compromise between the status quo and the recommendations of the independent review panel on the regional council.

ECan is offering the government what its chair Alec Neill describes as an olive branch.

They’re suggesting the government appoint a commissioner-advisor to manage the region’s water.

They also recommend an external advisory group be set up to assist the commissioner and councillors.

“We’ve come up with what we believe ticks all the boxes for the Government to carry out their direction as to water but allows for the community to retain elected representation.”

The intention was for ECan elections to still go ahead this year, Neill said.

The advisory group would comprise two members of Local Government New Zealand’s regional affairs committee, one Ngai Tahu representative, one member of the Canterbury Mayoral forum, Neill and the commissioner-adviser.

The review panel’s recommendation to sack the council and appoint a commissioner would have requried legislation.

ECan’s offer would mean there is no need for that, provide an opportunity for improved water management in the region and still allow council elections in October.

This isn’t as radical as the review panel’s recommendations but it would retain democratic elections and enable action to improve the region’s water management much sooner than any changes which required legislation.

The need for improved management of Canterbury’s water is urgent and if ECan’s plan was accepted work could start immediately.


Did you see the one about . . .

March 6, 2010

Must have an irony deficiency – Longinius Howard at Born On State Highway One laments the lack of irony.

Thank you for not expressing yourself – Theodore Dalrymple on the civility of silence.

It takes a village but not my one thank you very much – In A Strange Land on train troubles for travelling twins.

The Other Side of The Red Bus Lou Taylor at No Minister

Apropos of that: Labour’s latest taxpayer funded elecitoneering – Liberation reckons Labour hasn’t learned from the reaction to the pledge card rort.

Still on the same topic – Faster than a speeding tax  bus – Keeping Stock couldn’t keep up even when he edged over the speed limit.

The inheritance of face recognition (should you blame your parents if you can’t recognise faces) Grant Jacobs at Sciblogs – provides an excuse for facial recognition failures.

Graham Sydney in North Dakota – Quote Unquote finds nature imitating art imitating nature.

Celebrating pain relief – Opinionated Mummy on birth battles.

Tim Shadblot lays it bare – Southern Squall has an exclusive interview with Invercargill’s mayor.

What parking fines?! RivettingKateTaylor finds communication can counter fines.

The devil made me do it – Macdoctor’s not impressed by excuses.

Pukeko Bridge – Not PC shows there’s art in engineering.

The light dawns reality bites # 82 – Inquiring Mind on media priorities.

One year anniversary – Offsetting Behaviour celebrates his birthday with links to posts readers liked, and some the writerd did but readers didn’t. Also at Offsetting Behaviour – beer and revenue – how hatred led to better health.


ClustrMaps

March 6, 2010

It’s a year since I discovered ClustrMaps which records visitor locations and numbers.

An email last night advised me that the record for the past 12 months is being archived and a fresh map started.

If this didn’t happen the map would turn into a giant red blob.

For the record, here’s where visitors have come from in the last year:

UPDATE: on the subject of visitors Something Should Go Here has the February blog stats. His vary quite markedly from the sitemeter rankings at Open Parachute and Tim Selwyn’s blogosphere rankings at Tumeke!


Where do you go when you’ve gotta go and there’s nowhere to go?

March 6, 2010

The car park at the bottom of Mount Iron on the outskirts of Wanaka almost always has at least one overnight freedom camper.

If you’re not prepared to pay to stay the night it’s not a bad place to choose because there are public loos just over the fence.

Not everywhere freedom campers frequent has such convenient conveniences.

If you travel from Wanaka to Cromwell earlyish in the morning it’s not unusual to pass more than a dozen freedom campers parked up along the road beside Lake Dunstan.

That might not be a problem for the bigger campervans which have their own loos. But it is for the smaller vans and station wagons which don’t.

There’s not a public loo for miles so where do these campers go when they need to go?

The answer sadly is almost anywhere which has led to calls to ban campervans and/or restrict freedom camping.

Waitaki Mp Jacqui Dean says education not regulation is the answer:

“We need to be communicating better with visitors to this country, so that they appreciate the precious environment in which they’re travelling and understand the expectations which exist.

“Part of the responsibility lies with rental and tour companies who are often the first point of contact for many of the travellers who visit this country.

“However, local councils also need to step up to the mark, by providing campervan friendly facilities with adequate toilet and rubbish disposal areas, appropriate signage outlining the rules and in some cases council staff visibly enforcing standards,” Mrs Dean said.

“I think this problem can be addressed if everyone works together and ensures that the expectations, which we as New Zealanders have in relation to our environment, are clearly passed on to visitors.”

Some districts do ban freedom campers in certain places for very good reasons  but I agree that on the whole education is better than regulation.

One of the reasons for the pee and pooh problem is probably that people from more populated countries aren’t accustomed to so much open space and distance between towns.

But open space isn’t necessarily public property and even if it is it’s not a public convenience.

Travellers need to know that if they can’t go they can’t stay.


March 6 in history

March 6, 2010

On March 6:

1454 Thirteen Years’ War: Delegates of the Prussian Confederation pledged allegiance to King Casimir IV of Poland who agreed to commit his forces in aiding the Confederation’s struggle for independence from the Teutonic Knights.

1475 Michelangelo, Italian artist, was born.

1521 Ferdinand Magellan arrived at Guam.

1788 The First Fleet arrived at Norfolk Island in order to found a convict settlement.

1806 Elizabeth Barrett Browning, was born.

 

1820 The Missouri Compromise was signed into law by President James Monroe  allowing Missouri to enter the Union as a slave state, but made the rest of the northern part of the Louisiana Purchase territory slavery-free.

1836 Battle of the Alamo – After a thirteen day siege by an army of 3,000 Mexican troops, the 187 Texas volunteers defending the Alamo were defeated and the fort was captured.

The crumbling facade of a stone building is missing its roof and part of its second floor. A pile of stone rubble sits in the courtyard. In front of the building are a horse-drawn carriage and several people in 1850s-style clothing: women in long dresses with full skirts and men in suits with top hats.

1853 Giuseppe Verdi‘s opera La Traviata receives its premiere performance in Venice.

1857Supreme Court of the United States ruled in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case that people of African descent imported into the United States and held as slaves, or their descendants —whether or not they were slaves—were not protected by the Constitution and could never be citizens of the United States..

1869 Dmitri Mendeleev presented the first periodic table to the Russian Chemical Society.

1899 Bayer registered aspirin as a trademark.

1917 Frankie Howerd, English comedian, was born.


 

1921 Portuguese Communist Party was founded as the Portuguese Section of the Communist International.

Portuguese Communist Party official symbol.png

1926 Alan Greenspan, American economist, 13th Chairman of the Federal Reserve, was born.

 

1927 Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian writer, Nobel Prize laureate, was born.

1944  Kiri Te Kanawa, New Zealander singer, was born.

1944  Mary Wilson, American singer (The Supremes), was born.

1946 David Gilmour, British musician (Pink Floyd), was born.

1947  Kiki Dee, British singer, was born.

1947 Dick Fosbury, American athlete, was born.

A man in an athletic uniform is jumping over the high jump bar headfirst and backwards. His legs trail behind his body as he clears the bar. A high jumper performing a Fosbury flop, curving his body over the bar as he goes over it head-first and backwards

 1945 Communist-dominated government under Petru Groza assumed power in Romania.

1945 Cologne was captured by American Troops.

1946  Ho Chi Minh signed an agreement with France which recognizes Vietnam as an autonomous state in the Indochinese Federation and the French Union.

1947 The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra made its debut performance – opening the concert in Wellington’s Town Hall with God Save The King the performing selections from Dvorak, Brahms, Butterworth, Enesco, Wagner and Richard Strauss.

Debut performance of NZ Symphony Orchestra

1951 – The trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg for conspiracy to commit espionage in the USA began.

1953 Georgy Maksimilianovich Malenkov succeeded Joseph Stalin as Premier of the Soviet Union and First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.


 

1957 British colonies Gold Coast and British Togoland became the independent Republic of Ghana.

1964 Nation of Islam’s Elijah Muhammad officially gave boxing champion Cassius Clay the name Muhammad Ali.

Muhammad Ali NYWTS.jpg

1964 Constantine II became King of Greece.

 

1967  Joseph Stalin’s daughter Svetlana Alliluyeva defected to the United States.

1975 For the first time, ever, the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination was shown in motion to a national TV audience by Robert J. Groden and Dick Gregory.

 Frame 150 from the Zapruder Film

1975 – Algiers Accord: Iran and Iraq announce a settlement of their border dispute.

1981 After 19 years of presenting the CBS Evening News, Walter Cronkite signed off for the last time.

Cronkitenasa.PNG

1983 The first United States Football League game was played.

1987 The British ferry MS Herald of Free Enterprise capsized in about 90 seconds killing 193.

Herald of Free Enterprise.jpg
 

1988 Three Provisional Irish Republican Army terrorists are killed by Special Air Service in  Gibraltar in the conclusion of Operation Flavius.

1992 Michelangelo computer virus began to affect computers.

2006 South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds signed legislation banning most abortions in the state.

2008 A Palestinian gunman shot and killed 8 students and critically injured 11 in the library of the Mercaz HaRav yeshiva, in Jerusalem.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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