NZ 1 – Bahrain 0

November 14, 2009

Now is not the time to confess I’ve never been interested in what some call the beautiful game.

The last time the All Whites qualified for a FIFA World Cup was 1982.

I was in Britain then. As happens when you’re overseas and someone from home does something of note, even those of us who had no interest in what we then called soccer and is now known as football, got excited.

UPDATE: Keeping Stock has come out of retirement for an enthusiastic first hand report on the game.


ACC protestor crashes

November 14, 2009

A biker hit a car after leaving the protest against increases in ACC levies for motorbikes. He’s believed to have broken his leg.

I wonder what’s more painful – the broken leg or the knowledge that he’s just added proof to the argument for increasing the fees?


Whitebait Fritters

November 14, 2009

One of our men manages the North Otago rugby team. He returned home from the West Coast with the Lochore Cup and a couple of bags of whitebait.

It’s wasted on me, but those who like it reckon the best way to cook it is to keep is simple.

Take a couple of eggs for each cup of whitebait.

Beat the eggs, stir in salt, ground black pepper and whitebait.

whitebait etc 002

 

Cook in a lightly greased frying pan or on a barbeque.

whitebait etc 003

Serve immediately with lemon.

Sagenz at No Minister reckons Whitebait Fritters are New Zealand’s quintessential dish.

He posted on that in response to Busted Blonde at Roarprawn who asked the question: what is our national dish?


Saturday’s smiles

November 14, 2009

Q: What happened to the clock that fell into the sheep dip?

A: It lost all its ticks.

Q: “Why do sheep always mill round when they approach a gate?
A: They’re all saying, “After ewe”

Q: What do you call a sheep without legs?

A: A cloud. 

Q: What do you get if you cross a boa and a sheep?
A: A wrap-around jumper.


Kiwi cows say cheese for Californian cownterparts

November 14, 2009

Filming advertisements in New Zealand by overseas companies isn’t unusual.

But there is more than a little irony when a US company plans to shoot ads for California milk from California cows in New Zealand using New Zealand cows.

Speaking from an admittedly biased point of view I can understand why they want to mooove to greener pastures for the filming. Although it’s saving moola rather than the quality of the cows which is behind the mooove.

The California Milk Board says they’re coming here because it’s cheaper to film New Zealand animals than their Californian cownterparts.

The ads are part of a series which invite viewers to vote for their favourite cow.


Reading by example

November 14, 2009

A few weeks ago Rural Delivery on TV1 had a story about a dairy farmer who had gone organic.

What the story didn’t say was that the farmer had recently become a director of a fertiliser company.

My farmer reckoned that would be a bit like a sheep and beef farmer going vegetarian or a dairy farmer who didn’t eat cheese.

Examples of industrial irony aren’t confined to farming. Quote Unquote has spotted it in literary circles in a post on the formation of the NZ Book Industry Alliance

It’s an alliance between the National Library of New Zealand and the Publishers Association of New Zealand, Booksellers New Zealand, New Zealand Book Council, New Zealand Book Month and the New Zealand Society of Authors.

“We formed the alliance to establish closer working relationships and to work together to promote and celebrate books“ Penny Carnaby National Librarian and Chief Executive, National Library of New Zealand.

In support of the protocol Wellington head librarians have pledged to read a book every month and challenge all kiwis to do the same.

People whose work involves books who have to pledge to read need to ask themselves if they’re in the right job.

They might also want to contemplate the poster on the wall of Otago University’s English Department which said I read, therefore I think.


Victim impact report censored

November 14, 2009

Gil Elliot, the father of Sophie who was murdered by Clayton Weatherston, wants changes to the law to allow greater freedom of expression for people giving victim impact statements.

The statement he delivered to the court before Clayotn Weatherston was sentenced was heavily censored and he is justifiably angry about that.

There is something wrong with a justice system which allows an accused person to besmirch his victim’s reputation but censors her father’s victim impact statement.


%d bloggers like this: