Saturday’s Smiles

June 13, 2009

It had to be related to Simon and Garfunkel:

 

song chart memes

From GraphJam

SInging from the same song sheet:

Hat Tip: MatthewL Musings

 


The Boxer

June 13, 2009

How anything which aims to hurt an opponent can be classified as sport, escapes me, but I still like this song.


El Condor Pasa

June 13, 2009

The first of two Simon and Garfunkel posts for Saturday: El Condor Pasa.


Cheese Rolls

June 13, 2009

How dare he?

I don’t know who he was but a TV1 Breakfast reporter was casting aspersions on cheese rolls in a build-up-t0-the-test report earlier in the week.

What’s so strange about cheese rolls?

If, as the reporter’s mirth suggested they’re very rarely found further north, that’s their culinary catastrophe. Down here in the south thery’re often found in cafes and they’re a staple of southern fundraisers

A public servant, brought up in Dunedin, now working in Wellington told me recently he was organising a southern cultural induction for his workmates and discussions of the best recipe for cheese rolls among southern refugees prompted heated discussion.

This is my mother’s recipe.

1/2 lb/250g grated cheese           1 egg 

3/4 cup milk                                       1 grated onion

frozen corn                                        grainy mustard

thin sliced bread

Beat egg then add cheese, milk and onion.

Cook in double boiler, stirring til thickens (or cook in microwave, stirring often).

Remove from heat and beat well (or put in kitchen whizz).

Add corn.

Cut crusts from bread and spread with mustard.

Spread with mixture

cheese rolls 003

Roll bread:

cheese rolls 004

Place on baking tray and cook for about 5 minutes until bread is toasted.

If you’re not going to eat them in the next day or so, put them uncooked on the baking tray, freeze and bag.

Mum’s recipe used tasty cheese and white bread. I prefer wholemeal bread and a mixure of edam and parmesan which has the flavour but lower fat.


Farmers fight protectionism

June 13, 2009

Federated Farmers found some allies in their fight for free trade at a meeting of the Carins Group Farm Leaders in Indonesia this week.

Federated Farmers President, Don Nicolson and vice president, Frank Brenmuhl, said farm leaders round the world supported Feds’ in condemning protectionism and trade barriers. 

“Farm leaders were highly critical of trade restrictions that have spread across the globe like a plague. Since the world economy went into recession last year, 17 of the G20 countries have implemented some form of protectionism.

“There is no doubt export subsidies hurt farmers and consumers alike. That is why we denounce the US and EU’s move to subsidise their inefficient dairy farmers.

“When countries adopted bad economic policies in decades past, only their own citizens paid the price. What these Governments don’t seem to understand is that, in today’s global economy, the burden falls far more broadly.

The only people who benefit in the long run from trade barriers are the bureaucrats whose jobs depend on them.

Taxpayers, consumers and producers all pay dearly for protectionist policies which increase costs and inefficiencies.


Time for a public conversation

June 13, 2009

Jim Hopkins is right:

It’s impossible to know how many people suspect the competence of the police to investigate major crimes. But it’s reasonable to suggest the percentage is statistically significant.

One conversation at one party on one Saturday night can’t be proof – but it can be a pointer.

And what it points to is something corrosive and damaging, something that needs to be addressed. Something we should be talking about – not in private but in public.

And the police probably need to start the conversation. First by acknowledging there is an undercurrent of distrust in the community they serve. And second by conceding they’re aware of its cause.

Read the full column and start the conversation, not to bash the police but to rebuild trust in them.


June 13 in history

June 13, 2009

On June 13:

In 1774 Rhode Island became the first of Britain’s American colonies to ban the importation of slaves.

In 1865 William Butler Yeats  was born.

In 1970 the Beatles’ song The Long and Winding Road  became the Beatles’ last number 1 song.


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