Was Sanlu advertising infant formula?

Heinz was prevented from advertising a change in its baby formula  which made some babies ill in New Zealand because of a code banning the advertsing of alternatives to breast milk.

But in China, where four babies have died and thousands are ill because of drinking infant formula poisoned by melamine, the Sunday Star Times (not on line) reports:

… breast feeding has gone out of fashion.

Most mothers return to work soon after giving birth. Few work places provide a private location for expressing breast milk. even mothers who do breastfeed often give formula as a supplement in the mistaken belief that their breast milk is not enough.

World Health Organisation guidelines which discourage advertisements for breast milk substitutes are generally strictly adhered to in developed countries. But are they everywhere?

There are many concerns over the way Fonterra has handled the problem of Sanlu, in which it has a 43% share, using contaminated milk in the production of infant formula. This report suggests we have reason to ask if the company breached WHO advertising standards too:

“. . .  and its advertising was famous for boasting that its formula underwent ‘1100 tests, safeguards the health care of babies and is trusted by mothers everywhere’.”

No company Fonterra is involved in would advertise breast milk substitutes in New Zealand. It should not allow any company it is involved with to do anything to get in the way of the message that breast milk is best for babies anywhere else either.

One Response to Was Sanlu advertising infant formula?

  1. adamsmith1922 says:

    There is a fact not mentioned above. but was in the WSJ article I referenced here:-
    http://adamsmith.wordpress.com/2008/09/22/7088/

    “Formula has grown popular in this developing nation partly because of a rather sad reality: Many young mothers leave their infants under the care of their parents because they need to return to the big cities and factories to work after giving birth. Those children are primarily raised by their grandparents.”

    Consequently the SST article was not quite on the mark and may have been applying a Western viewpoint to the issue.

    As much as anything economic issues drive the use of formula.

    Good to see another blogger giving more ‘air time’ to this issue.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: