Right on top of blog rankings

July 1, 2014

Open Parachute’s monthly blog rankings show the right on top:

Visit Rank Blog Visits/month Page Views/month
1 Whale oil beef hooked 1758095 2957997
2 Kiwiblog 445721 771086
3 The Daily Blog 218234 345266
4 The Standard 201495 443470
5 Auckland Transport Blog 155853 160244
6 Throng New Zealand 53729 94004
7 The Dim-Post 53509 75134
8 Sciblogs 39662 50631
9 Liturgy 36160 50478
10 Keeping Stock 33807 53244
11 No Right Turn 26757 35029
12 Homepaddock 26471 36951
13 NewZeal 21726 35094
14 No Minister 20898 27292
15 Music of sound 14879 18833
16 Imperator Fish 13552 17547
17 13th Floor 12544 17630
18 Save our schools NZ 12355 14307
19 Keith Johnson Wellington NZ 12120 12574
20 Offsetting Behaviour 11835 16377

 

The combined total of the top left-wing blogs, which are at third and fourth, is still less than Kiwiblog which is second and miles from Whale Oil in first place.

Dim Post from the left is seventh and Keeping Stock from the right is 10th. I’m at 12, No Minister, which is more right than not is at 14th and Imperator Fish which is left is 16th.

I ditched Sitemeter because I kept getting a window asking me to sign in to it and now rely on StatCounter to record visits:

stats6.14

 

 


2013 in review

January 1, 2014

The clever WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 370,000 times in 2013. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 16 days for that many people to see it. . . 

The top referring sites were:

  1. nominister.blogspot.co.nz
  2. keepingstock.blogspot.co.nz
  3. kiwiblog.co.nz
  4. nzconservative.blogspot.co.nz
  5. twitter.com

The most prolific commenters were:

  • 1 TraceyS 1383 comments
  • 2 robertguyton 811 comments
  • 3 Andrei 722 comments
  • 4 Viv 629 comments
  • 5 Armchair Critic 448 comments

Thank you to the people who write the blogs which refer readers here, the people who visit and the people who comment.

Click here to see the complete report.


2012 in review

January 1, 2013

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

About 55,000 tourists visit Liechtenstein every year. This blog was viewed about 300,000 times in 2012. If it were Liechtenstein, it would take about 5 years for that many people to see it. Your blog had more visits than a small country in Europe!

The top referring sites were:

  1. nominister.blogspot.co.nz
  2. kiwiblog.co.nz
  3. nzconservative.blogspot.co.nz
  4. keepingstock.blogspot.co.nz
  5. asianinvasion2006.blogspot.co.nz (Cactus Kate)

The post which got the most comments (51) was water quality concern for all.

The people who made the most comments were:

Robert Guyton # 1 and # 5 is the same person, I think he gets two spots because some comments are linked to his blog and others aren’t.

Thank you all for visiting, those who link and hat tip from their blogs and those who join the conversation.

I appreciate your comments, whether or not I agree with them. A conversation among several is far more interesting than a one-woman diatribe.

I especially appreciate that almost everyone debates the topic and critiques arguments rather than resorting to personal criticism.

I think I had to delete only one comment last year and only rarely had to take a deep breath.

And thanks to WordPress for the blogging platform and excellent service on the very rare occasions I’ve needed help.

Click here to see the complete report.


2011 in blogging

January 2, 2012

One of the services WordPress supplies for its bloggers is an annual report at year’s end.

London Olympic Stadium holds 80,000 people. This blog was viewed about 330,000times in 2011. If it were competing at London Olympic Stadium, it would take about 4 sold-out events for that many people to see it.

In 2011, there were 2,419 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 8,791 posts. There were 93 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 7mb. That’s about 2 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was October 20th with 1,947 views . . .

The top referring sites were:

nominister.blogspot.com

kiwiblog.co.nz

nzconservative.blogspot.com

keepingstock.blogspot.com

asianinvasian.blogspot.com (Cactus Kate).

The most active commenters were: Robert Guyton 1008 comments, Gravedodger 604 commments; Andrei 539 comments; PDM 311 comments and Inventory 2 249 comments.

Thank you WordPress and all readers and commenters.

UPDATE: Open Parachute has December’s sitemeter rankings and Whaleoil is now #1 with  260294 unique visitors last month.


Is there a link . . .

October 2, 2011

. . .  between this:

and this:

Dan Carter has been ruled out of the All Blacks for the rest of the Rugby World Cup matches?

Hat Tip Kiwiblog and No Minister.


Rural round-up

May 29, 2011

Photovoltaic energy neutral grass based dairy farms – Pasture to Profit writes:

Two grass based dairy farmers in the Pasture to Profit Network(one in Herefordshire & the other in Brittany, France) have or are about to achieve “Energy Neutral” status (with regard to electricity use on farm). Both have installed solar panels on their farm shed roofs. http://www.solon.com/global/
Energy neutral status is where 100% of the energy that is consumed is actually generated by the farmer user. . .

Lancashire biogas plant is go - Paul at Business Blog writes:

A £3m farm-based anaerobic digestion plant in Lancashire has been officially “switched on”.

The Carr Farm plant, near Warton, will produce biogas from silage and energy crops grown on surrounding land to generate 800kW of electricity, enough to power more than 1,000 homes. . .

2010 kiwifruit season lifts return to growers:

A strong 2010 kiwifruit season has lifted total payments to growers above season forecasts, with a particular highlight being a significant boost in returns to GREEN kiwifruit growers over the 2009 season, ZESPRI’s 2010/11 financial results show.

Total returns to growers in 2010/11 improved from $849.0 million to $883.3 million compared to the prior year, an increase of four percent, with average Orchard Gate Returns to ZESPRI GREEN growers increasing nine percent to $32,234.

Net global kiwifruit sales increased one percent to $1.511 billion in 2010/11, despite the global volume of ZESPRI(r) Kiwifruit sold falling one percent in the same period. . .

Daily grind taking for the dairy farmer -

The alarm clock shrills. It’s half- past-bloody-four and another farming day is under way.

At least it’s not raining, but he still needs the Swanndri. It’s cold. And actually the farm could do with some rain. Too dry; too wet. Seldom just right.

It’s a long haul to the shed from this night paddock. Always a toss-up whether to go for the best feed overnight and accept extra distance and time required in the morning.

He pressures the tailenders with the farm bike and acknowledges there are times when a dog might come in handy. The heifers at the back of the mob are playing up a bit, skirmishing across the track, head-butted by a few dominant older girls in the herd.

The lights in the shed snap on, a startling line of illumination ahead in the rural darkness, so Toni will be washing down the concrete, getting organised. . .

Hat tip: Lou at No  Minister (The comments on his post make interesting reading too).

Payout good for NZ – Sally Rae writes:

“It’s a great time to be a farmer.” South Otago farmer Stafford Ferguson was responding yesterday to Fonterra’s announcement of a record payout for the season.

Describing the news as very positive, Mr Ferguson said it was a good time to pay debt back, while the forecast third-highest payout on record for next season “just eases pressure” looking forward a year out . . .

Win from Wheelchiar special - Sally Rae again:

Grant Calder pulls no punches when he says “life in a wheelchair is a bit of a s … “.

However, he hopes his remarkable success at the recent South Island sheep dog trial championships will send a message to disabled people that “it’s not the end of the world”. . .

Find true quality? The scan man can -  more form Sally Rae:

Peter Clulee is enjoying a well-deserved break.

Mr Clulee, who operates Otago Ultrasound, doing both eye muscle and pregnancy scans on sheep, has had a hectic few months.

Since the end of January, he has been travelling the South Island doing muscle scanning, working as far north as Blenheim and right down to Southland. . .

Sir Michael Fay still milking it - Bevan Hurley writes:

Sir Michael Fay, one of the country’s richest men, has swapped the bank for the barnyard and bought a $9.2 million slice of New Zealand’s dairy heartland.

The investment banker and island owner now lists “farmer” as his occupation when filling out immigration forms. . .

Strawbwerry pav pigues US media interest-

 

Luxury Queenstown hotelier The Rees and New Zealand Trade and Enterprise have showcased the country’s fine wine and cuisine at US culinary institution The James Beard Foundation, described by Time magazine as the “Oscars of the food world”.

 

The event, dubbed “Flavors of New Zealand”, was hosted by New Zealand’s consul general in New York, and included a themed luncheon followed by an evening banquet featuring handpicked ingredients from 14 producers, matched with wine varieties from eight vineyards represented by Complexity Fine Wine Group. . .

An insatiable thirst for knowledge -

Each day, as he goes around the dairy farm he manages, checking on the health and welfare of his human and animal friends and the land they share, Jason Halford carries with him two other dairy farmers.

“Geoff Arends is on my left shoulder and Bruce McCluskey is on my right,” he says. “I look at each situation and think what they would do. One day I’m Geoff, another I’m Bruce.”

They are the farmers who have influenced him most in the 17 years since he left school at 16 to go into dairying. . .

 


Trans Tasman traffic changing direction

May 28, 2011

Bill English was criticised a few weeks ago for suggesting that lower wages here was a competitive advantage.

What do the critics say now that Heinz Watties is moving some of its production from Australia to New Zealand?

After an extensive review of the trans Tasman manufacturing footprint and capabilities, the decision has been made to consolidate production of sauces, beetroot, and some canned meal products from facilities Girgarre (Victoria), Brisbane and Wagga Wagga (NSW), to facilities in Hastings.

Heinz Wattie’s Chief Operating Officer Michael Gibson says Heinz operates a number of factories across Australia and New Zealand and share production between the two countries depending on how customers and consumers can be best served in both markets. The decision to consolidate manufacturing is a critical step in the plan to become more competitive in a challenging environment and to accelerate future growth.

It all comes down to costs of production:

Australia’s supply chain director, Mike Robinson, says the change is the result of a global productivity review, and is not a result of the strong Australian dollar.

“There is pressure on suppliers from customers and consumers. But there are a number of factors,” he said.

“The cost of raw materials, labour, energy. All of these have pressure on suppliers which mean that we have to maintain competitiveness.”

People are going west across the Tasman but if production moves east to New Zealand then people will follow.

Australia is rich in natural resources but it doesn’t have the plentiful supply of water which helps us produce electricity at a cheaper cost.

Having lower wages isn’t good in the long term but can be a factor which helps economic growth in the short term. As the economy grows, wages will increase .

Hat tip: Adolf at No Minister


A rare endorsement

May 11, 2011

I know the enemy of my enemy can sometimes be an ally if not a friend.

And the lesser of two evils could be better or at least a long way less bad.

And that politics is only a difference of opinion not a war.

And I know that parliament would be a better place without Hone Harawira with his radical left-wing and racially confused agenda.

But I just can’t bring myself to say vote for a Labour candidate.

However, I will point you to the logic of others who don’t let emotion cloud their views:

Adolf explains why in My enemy’s enenmy at No Minister and there’s rare, very rare, endorsements by Cactus Kate, Whaleoil, Kiwiblog, Keeping Stock, and Fairfacts Media.

P.S. The Veteran at No Minister has some local intelligence which reckons Hone Harawira and the media have over-estimated his support.

p.p.s. That local intelligence is supported by this email which arrived this morning:

As a rule, I don’t pass along these “add your name” lists that appear in e-mails,

BUT this one is important.

It has been circulating for months and has been sent to over 2.2 million people.

We don’t want to lose any names on the list so just hit forward and send it on.

Please keep it going!   

To show your support for the MP, Hone Harawera, and the job  he is doing please go to the end of the list and add your name. ………. 
 

 
 
 

1.  Titiwhai Harawera
2. 


Did you see the one about

March 20, 2011

Americans call it experience not failure -  Peter Kerr calls for a change in thinking in New Zealand.

Some perspective –  Adolf at No Minister on what kills how many.

There’s glory for you! - Andrew Geddis at Pundit on a legal and literary mixup.

Party manifestos to be displayed in plain packets with government health warnings – Newsbiscuit on new rules for public protection. While there you might also enjoy Pay study shows women now 88% as good as men - a satirical take on pay equity.

Doesn’t work if you’re self employed though –  Something Should Go here Maybe Later on meetings as an alternative to work. While there you should see the footprint of my car will raise a smile.

And congratulations to the Hand Mirror on three years of Hand Mirrorness.


Did you see the one about . . .

December 5, 2010

A Thanksgiving Day lesson in political philosophy - Jeff Keren guest posts at Not PC on individual effort vs collectivism.

TVNZ Whizzing through the years - Brian Edwards looks back with the help of YouTube.

Twelve Days of Christmas - Keeping Stock puts a price on the gifts and includes the Irish version of the song.

Movie Economics - Macdoctor and the difference between giving and not taking.

Political crystal ball - the Veteran and No Minister looks ahead to 2011.

And now for something completely different - Food court flashmob does the Hallelujah Chorus at Inquiring Mind.

Welcome to Commissioner Marshall - Stephen Franks on the Police COmmissioner to be.

Uesless information for you - Lindsay Mitcehll on who’s paid for what.

Dulce et decorum est - Monkey with Typewriter on miners.

And a couple I missed from Tuesday’s Poem:

Orphans by Michele Amas - Mary McCallum on losing parents.

Not A Tuesday Poem - Ballad for Molly – Cadence pays a musical tribute to her Scottish grandmother.


Three views on Chilean miners’ rescue

October 17, 2010

Theodore Dalrymple in the Wall Street Journal – In Chile the lessons of isolation:

That they behaved with great fortitude, courage, faith and dignity will hardly be denied by anyone; the efforts to save them were inspiring. . .  Angels could hardly have done better. . .

 . . . The miners were also aided by another factor. While they were isolated in the physical sense, they were far from isolated in any other. For once, media attention was wholly beneficial in its effects. The miners were in the eye of the world. They knew that what they did, how they acted, would be known to untold millions.

You have only to consider an alternative scenario to realize how important this was to their survival. Suppose that they had been trapped underground all that time, with enough food and drink to survive, but not knowing whether anyone was making an effort to reach them, or whether their plight was of any concern to anyone other than their immediate family (something that they could pretty well assume, but which in those circumstances would have been a cause of anxiety rather than of consolation). Would their conduct then have been so admirable? Would they have been able to maintain their equanimity to such a remarkable degree?

It seems intuitively very unlikely . . . Here, then, is an illustration of the evident but often forgotten fact that social pressure is conducive to virtue as well as to vice. . . No man but an out-and-out psychopath wants to appear worse than his fellows in the eyes of the world; and the miners’ (justified) pride in appearing brave and self-composed helped them to survive their ordeal. . .

Jim Hopkins in the NZ Herald: 33 reasons to make us feel more alive.

Take a bow, humanity. We made it happen. Or, more precisely, our inventions did.

So many inventions from so many inventors: cables and pulleys and machines that harness electricity; gears and cogs and pumps making oxygen; wires and winches and wirelesses, too.

And there, turning slowly on top of its simple wooden frame, raising the Phoenix upward, one of the earliest of them all, our liberating, rescuing wheel.

Throughout our time on this planet, it’s the things we’ve invented that have masked our frailty and freed us from it. Not completely, of course; we’re too frail for that.

//

Disease and disaster still have their wicked way with us. So, for the frailties invention cannot master, we have faith and hope, prayer and drama. . .

. . .  No one watching the drama unfold on their picture machine can feel so intensely alive as those rescued miners must. Nor can we be as grateful and relieved as their families and lovers and friends. But we can share some part of those emotions and know that they make us feel more human and more alive.

“Be strong, my love. I love you,” one miner wrote to his wife from deep in the earth. “I love you.” That is all any of us can hope to hear. “Be strong, my love.” And that is all that any of us can be, whatever hole we’re in.

Daniel Henninger in the Wall Street Journal – Capitalism saved the miners (HatTip: Roger Kerr):

It needs to be said. The rescue of the Chilean miners is a smashing victory for free-market capitalism. . .

If those miners had been trapped a half-mile down like this 25 years ago anywhere on earth, they would be dead. What happened over the past 25 years that meant the difference between life and death for those men?

Short answer: the Center Rock drill bit.

This is the miracle bit that drilled down to the trapped miners. Center Rock Inc. is a private company in Berlin, Pa. It has 74 employees. The drill’s rig came from Schramm Inc. in West Chester, Pa. Seeing the disaster, Center Rock’s president, Brandon Fisher, called the Chileans to offer his drill. Chile accepted. The miners are alive.

Longer answer: The Center Rock drill, heretofore not featured on websites like Engadget or Gizmodo, is in fact a piece of tough technology developed by a small company in it for the money, for profit. That’s why they innovated down-the-hole hammer drilling. If they make money, they can do more innovation.

This profit = innovation dynamic was everywhere at that Chilean mine. The high-strength cable winding around the big wheel atop that simple rig is from Germany. Japan supplied the super-flexible, fiber-optic communications cable that linked the miners to the world above. . .

Samsung of South Korea supplied a cellphone that has its own projector. Jeffrey Gabbay, the founder of Cupron Inc. in Richmond, Va., supplied socks made with copper fiber that consumed foot bacteria, and minimized odor and infection. . .

 In an open economy, you will never know what is out there on the leading developmental edge of this or that industry.But the reality behind the miracles is the same: Someone innovates something useful, makes money from it, and re-innovates, or someone else trumps their innovation. Most of the time, no one notices. All it does is create jobs, wealth and well-being. But without this system running in the background, without the year-over-year progress embedded in these capitalist innovations, those trapped miners would be dead. . .

Update:

Hamish Collins at No Minister writes on The Chilean miners and capitalism.

And Pablo at Kiwi Politico  posts on The real Chilean miracle.

Update 3: Robert Tracinski at Not PC on Something heroic in their way of trading.


Did you see the one about . . .

July 4, 2010

New Zealand and Uruguay as sporting equivalents - Pablo at Kiwipolitico compares one small country where sport and agriculture are important with another.

Don’t admit them to hospital then - Macdoctor on the smoking ban for prisoners.

Star the second - In A Strange Land has a star chart to help her stay dry for July.

What makes us happy? Rivetting Kate Taylor on what really matters.

Sparks in the universe - Stellar Cafe on the bright ideas that get away from you.

What determines productivity? - Anti-Dismal on attemts toa nswer the big question.

Biology isn’t destiny but it affects your saving throws - Offsetting Behaviour on nature vs nurutre.

Trio - Quote Unquote on tree planting and muttering and purring.

Mines railways or jobs - Liberty Scott on unintended consequences.

Happy Birthday to us - Gooner at No Minister on the blog’s third birthday.

TraeMe hints - Oswald Bastable knows something but he’s not telling much.

Farewell to the Independent - Liberation bids the paper goodbye with a parody of Chirs Trotter’s writing.

Apropos of which is The Independent 1992 – 2010 at Bowalley Road. He also discusses the redefinition of protest in Russel’s tussle.


Three draws, no losses makes them winners

June 25, 2010

Here I am, not knowing one end of a football from the other (though I do know they’re round and therefore don’t have ends), writing a third post on the World Cup.

The All Whites went to South Africa as underdogs and return with three draws. They didn’t lose a game and while they didn’t win any either, they finished ahead of last year’s champions and they won lots of hearts in doing so.

They did this because they defied expectations though, Cactus Kate is right that they were so close but nowhere near:

Anyone who thinks this is New Zealand’s greatest sporting achievement is either a soccer fanatic or clearly knows nothing about sports. Sure it was the heart-warming Disney moment in New Zealand sports in living memory, but the result is tomorrow they fly home.

The All Blacks can only wish they could get away with three draws in their World Cup and have acceptance from the nation.

But this wasn’t the All Blacks, Black Caps, the Silver Ferns or Black Ferns, our rowers, runners, sailors or even Black Sticks any or all of whom we expect – sometimes even demand – to win some of the time.

No-one expected the All Whites to win and few would have been surprised if they’d lost every game. They didn’t, they drew them, surpassing expectations, and in doing so they did a lot – for themselves, the team and the sport.

Lindsay Mitchell finds plenty to celebrate.

Keeping Stock has a song for the All Whites and says it was great while it lasted.

Adolf at No Minister says they are out but not down.

Monkeywith typewriter says well done All Whites.

Not PC thinks it was a great result.

And PM of NZ is underwhlemed and looking forward to a return to normality.

Update: Kiwiblog notes we never lost a game.


1-1: excitement’s contagious

June 16, 2010

What many regard as the beautiful game doesn’t feature on my radar and when I’ve come in ear shot of the TV while the World Cup’s been on the sound of the vuvuzelas, has driven me away.

But excitement is contagious and I have to applaud the All Whites for the 1-1 draw this morning.

Like the Hand Mirror, this is probably the only post I’ll write about the World Cup (soccer) edition.

For more informed views:

Keeping Stock has some bleary eyed reflections.

At No Minister Barnsley Bill says goooooooal

Kiwiblog says well done the All Whites – and philosophers may be interested in his comment that anything that isn’t a loss is a win.

And Not PC mixes art and sport with Glad Day William Blake.


Budget reaction

May 21, 2010

Patrick Smellie sniffs an unusually successful Budget:

What makes the Budget particularly strong is the extraordinary state of the Crown accounts. If net Crown debt is to peak at less than 30% of GDP after the most wrenching debt crisis ever to hit the developed world, then we’re looking in reasonable shape.

If it weren’t for the fact that the Budget economic forecasts still have current account deficits at around 7% of GDP for the foreseeable future, there would be an argument that English could borrow a bit more and get the place really going.

Tax experts say it’s bold and radical:

“The property sector will understandably not welcome some aspects of this Budget,” said accounting firm KPMG’s chief executive, Jan Dawson. The surprise cut to 28% in the company tax rate from next April would help offset any negatives among a raft of changes removing or tightening property investment and other sources of tax deductibility.

The Budget was “the most radical in years”, said Deloitte chief executive Murray Jack, and represented “a big bet on the delivery of the required impetus for the government’s growth strategy.”

The New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants pointed out that it was history repeating. The corporate tax rate was 28% in 1989, while the top tax rate only rose beyond 33% in 2001.

“Ever since then, the tax system has fallen into disarray as governments have tried to apply band-aid arrangements to avoid the 39% rate,” said NZICA’s Craig Macalister. “This is a welcome return to a simpler tax system, and it removes some of the incentives to structure for tax purposes rather than for commercial purposes.”

Chapman Tripp tax partner Casey Plunket said “no one should mourn the passing of the 38% top personal tax rate.”
“It was always a fraud, the cost of which was not borne by the wealthy but by those who earned … income which they could not shelter in companies or trusts,” Plunket said. “People with substantial assets, the real wealthy, were almost completely unaffected by it.”

. . . The New Zealand Property Council wasn’t happy with the investment property tax changes, but called it a “bold Budget” that was “good for New Zealand, at the property sector’s expense.”

Federated farmers applauds the tax incentives but wanted more for agriculture:

Federated Farmers is welcoming Budget 2010 with some misgivings about the ongoing growth of Government spending and the impact of higher Government charges, particularly the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), will have on inflation.

“The Government’s ambition to rebalance the economy in favour of the tradable sector is admirable,” says Philip York, Federated Farmers economics & commerce spokesperson.

“The Government’s emphasis on encouraging sustainable growth, based on productivity and competitiveness is strongly endorsed and we welcome a much improved economic and fiscal outlook. . .

. . . “Federated Farmers is very disappointed the Regulatory Responsibility Bill, something designed to introduce discipline to regulation, continues to languish. There’s actually no need for further consultation, as stated in the Minister’s Budget speech.  It’s a high quality well drafted Bill so let’s get on with it.

“All in all this is a Budget that looks good but it is very much work in progress with more needed to be done if we are to get the tradable sector led growth we all want,” concluded Mr York.

The Business Round table says there are sound steps but no step change:

“The government deserves credit for correcting some of the economic mistakes of its predecessor but is still well away from putting the economy on a strong and balanced growth path”, Roger Kerr, executive director of the New Zealand Business Roundtable, said today.

Colin Espiner writes English sprinkles the  fairy dust:

Somehow, English has managed to please all of the people all of the time – at least, everyone except the unions, Labour, and Hone Harawira. And it’ll be a cold day in the Beehive before those three agrees with anything National does. . .

. . . Overall I reckon this is easily a better Budget than last year’s effort and probably trumps anything Labour came up with in the past nine years as well.  

And over at No Minister The Veteran discusses whose views can be disregarded and why.


Mistress of Mistressology mis-steps

May 16, 2010

I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting Busted Blonde at Roarprawn but her blog posts, and some whispers on the grapevine, have earned my respect.

The woman who claims to have a trademark on the term mistressology obviously doesn’t know her reputation or she wouldn’t have been silly enough to get her knickers twisted about BBs use of the term on a post giving advice to mistresses.

The one who claims to be a mistress of mistressology has mis-stepped by picking a fight with the wrong woman.

BB is not the sort to head to port when the sea gets rough and she’s got to the nub of the matter, if you Google search mistressology  it leads to Roarprawn and the not the other woman’s website.

In an act of bloggers’ solidarity I’m joining Whaleoil, Cactus Kate and No Minister who have carried the story and by doing so increased links to Roarprawn which will put her up the Google rankings more.

UPDATE: Motella has joined the campagin too.

Update 2: so has Inquiring Mind 

And look what a google search now turns up:

Search Results

  1. Cactus Kate: Mistressology (ck)

    The first rule of Mistressology Kala really is to choose your target well. You don’t pick on women who when they are alerted to your existence will chew
    asianinvasion2006.blogspot.com/2010/…/mistressology-ck.html19 hours ago

    Mistressology Trademark Fail | Whale Oil Beef Hooked | Gotcha!

  2. 15 May 2010 Probably about now some stupid pommy cow called Ms. Kala Elliot will be wishing she had just STFU. She has tried to bully Busted Blonde
    whaleoil.gotcha.co.nz/2010/05/…/mistressology-trademark-fail/21 hours ago

    Mistress of Mistressology mis-steps « Homepaddock

  3. 16 May 2010 The woman who claims to have a trademark on the term mistressology obviously doesn’t know her reputation or she wouldn’t have been silly
    homepaddock.wordpress.com/2010/…/mistress-of-mistressology/6 hours ago

    roarprawn: MISTRESSOLOGY

  4. 6 Apr 2010 Final rule of mistressology – it will end in tears sooner or later – relationships on any level based on betrayal and lies are always doomed
    roarprawn.blogspot.com/2010/04/mistressology.htmlCached
  5. roarprawn: ROARPRAWN ACCUSED OF PIRACY

    We called the post Mistressology. Like as in the study of Mistresses I am the author of the forthcoming book entitled Mistressology and am requesting
    roarprawn.blogspot.com/2010/05/roarprawn-accused-of-piracy.htmlCached

 

  • No Minister: Mistressology claimed as trademark

    15 May 2010 My name is Ms. Kala Elliott and I am the owner of the Trademark ‘Mistressology‘. The application was made last year on my behalf by my UK
    nominister.blogspot.com/2010/05/mistressology-claimed-as-trademark.html
  • Mistressology « The Inquiring Mind

    16 May 2010 Mistressology. May 16, 2010. tags: Cactus Kate, Mistressology, No Minister, Roarprawn, Whaleoil. by adamsmith1922
    adamsmith.wordpress.com/2010/05/16/mistressology/1 hour ago

    “Motella” – News, Views and Politics of New Zealand’s Motel

  • 15 May 2010 Busted Blonde is now being cyber-stalked from the UK by a Ms. Kala Elliot that claims to have ownership of the Trademark term Mistressology
    motella.blogspot.com/2010/05/mistressology.html7 hours ago

    “Motella” – News, Views and Politics of New Zealand’s Motel

  • 15 May 2010 After only 4-minutes of us publishing a blog post on Mistressology, we note that we have appeared on page one of Google using the search
    motella.blogspot.com/2010/05/mistressology-part-2.html8 hours ago

    Gotcha! | Politics | Humour | Information | News | Opinion | Debate

  • UPDATE 3: Oswald Bastable is supporting BB too.

    Camembert and brie are healthy

    April 27, 2010

    It’s official – camembert and brie and healthy.

    So are lamb racks and oysters.

    So is canned and dried fruit – even if it has more sugar and preservative than vitamins.

    So is pizza and full cream, high sugar yoghurt but, alas, not low fat ice cream.

    So are Cactus Kate’s favourite dishes at Euro.

    Gooner at No Minsiter thinks McDonalds’ burgers are and Whaleoil reckons most food at KFC is too.

    The Maori Party’s Goods and Services Tax (Exemption of Healthy Foods Bill says so:

    • Fruit and vegetables (including fresh, frozen, canned and dried):
    • Breads and cereals (including all bread, grains, rice and pasta):
    • Milk and milk products (including cheese, yoghurt and plain milk, but excluding ice cream, cream products, condensed and flavoured milk):
    • Lean meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, nuts, seeds and legumes

    The Visible Hand in Economics asks several good questions about the research behind the desire for exempetions.

    I reckon it just proves that while good tax is an oxymoron, simple taxes are better.


    Did you see the one about . . .

    April 17, 2010

    Tuesday’s poem - a new (to me) blog which features a new poem once a week and links to other blogs who post a poem on Tuesdays (Hat Tip Beatties Book Blog – and also over there is erotic vegan poetry - not the average gift for a politician and 10 rules for writing fiction..

    Licensed to kill - Macdoctor thinks the driving age is still too low.

    Anzac Day an alternative to wreaths - The Veteran at No Minister asks if we should follow the Australian example of one official wreath and others leaving books to be donated to schools.

    That went well/badly - Dim Post’s plot to prove TV news is useless went awry.

    PPTA declares war on ministers - John Ansell shows on what teacher unions really want.

    Ian Sharp on James K Baxter - Quote Unquote with another 10th annivesary reprint from Quote Unquote.

    When freedom isn’t free - the difference between classical and modern liberals at Skeptical Doctor.


    Did you see the one about . . .

    February 23, 2010

    Unemployment - Something Goes Here has a cracker cartoon from Garrick Tremain.

    A rural joke - Quote Unquote on sounds you hear on most farms (Though not Rob’s father’s).

    Warning food is a choking hazard – Opinionated Mummy on the danger of warnings against danger.

    How I became a Science teacher from Alison Campbell at Sciblogs and on a similar theme: Career Day – Rivetting Kate Taylor on how she got into journalism.

    So good I stole it – Adolf at No Minister  and Dos and don’ts for cuddle class - Kiwiblog  illustrates in-flight etiquette.

    Come take my stuff – Roar Prawn warns that technology can tell too much.

    Top 10 at 10 Interest.co.nz has some funny cartoons among the serious stuff.

    How not to define social sciences at Anti Dismal  . 

    Exaggerating the benefits of Community Education at The Visable Hand In Economics and apropos of this Really big numbers at Off Setting Behaviour.


    NZ a square peg in round ETS hole

    November 24, 2009

    New Zealand’s problem is that we’re different.

    Primary production and industries based on it are our bigeest export earners; almost all our forestry is from exotic species; we have relatively little heavy industry and the bulk of our power is already from renewable sources.

    The Kyoto Protocol wasn’t designed for countries like us.

    The heavy reliance on primary production is much more common in developing countries. But around half our emissions come from animals and there is little, short of reducing stock numbers, we can do to reduce them immediately. Research is being undertaken to reduce emissions from livestock but practical, affordable solutions may be years away.

    The rules requiring new trees to be replanted where old ones were felled was aimed at protecting rain forests and indigenous species. It seems no-one considered that a clause aimed at protecting indigenous trees shouldn’t apply to exotic timber species in a country where they grow as well as they do here.

    Our private vehicle ownership is high by world standards but that reflects our relatively small, widespread population which means that public transport is neither practical nor affordable in many places.

    New Zealand is a square peg and we were ill served by the negotiators who tried to fit us into the round ETS hole.

    I have a lot of confidence in Tim Groser who will be working on our behalf at the Copenhagen summit.

    But I thought the whole thing was a dog’s breakfast from the start and my concerns are even greater now that there are questions over manipulation of climate change data.

    Over at Sciblogs Aimee Witcroft raises the possibility the leaked emails have been doctored and points to a Guardian story  on the issue. It quotes Prof Bob Watson, the chief scientific advisor at Britain’s Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs who said,

    “Evidence for climate change is irrefutable. The world’s leading scientists overwhelmingly agree what we’re experiencing is not down to natural variation.”

     Also at Sciblogs Gareth Renowden isn’t convinced by the leaked material.

    For a contrary view see:  Ian Wishart,  Adolf at No Minister,  Roarprawn, Whaleoil,  Not PC, Poneke,  Mr Tips at NZ Conservative, Thoughts from 40 South, and Something Should Go Here  who says: 

    I’ll say it a thousand times, climate change activism is about politics, not science.


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