November 9 in history

November 9, 2013

694 – Egica, a king of the Visigoths of Hispania, accused Jews of aiding Muslims, sentencing all Jews to slavery.

1282 – Pope Martin IV excommunicated King Peter III of Aragon.

1313 – Louis the Bavarian defeated his cousin Frederick I of Austria at the Battle of Gamelsdorf.

1330 – Battle of Posada, Wallachian Voievode Basarab I defeated the Hungarian army in an ambush.

1456 – Ulrich II of Celje last prince of Celje principality, was assassinated in Belgrade.

1492 – Peace of Etaples between Henry VII and Charles VIII.

1494 – The Family de’ Medici were expelled from Florence.

1620 – Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sighted land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

1688 – The Glorious Revolution: William of Orange captured Exeter.

1720 – The synagogue of Yehudah he-Hasid was burned down by Arab creditors, leading to the expulsion of the Ashkenazim from Jerusalem.

1729 – Spain, France and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Seville.

1764 – Mary Campbell, a captive of the Lenape during the French and Indian War, was turned over to forces commanded by Colonel Henry Bouquet.

1769 – Captain Cook and astronomer Charles Green observed the transit of Mercury at Te Whanganui-a-hei (Mercury Bay) on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Captain Cook observes transit of Mercury

1791 – Foundation of the Dublin Society of United Irishmen.

1799 – Napoleon Bonaparte led the Coup d’état of 18 Brumaire ending the Directory government, and becoming one of its three Consuls (Consulate Government).

1841 King Edward VII was born (d. 1910).

1851 – Kentucky marshals abducted abolitionist minister Calvin Fairbank from Jeffersonville, Indiana, and took him to Kentucky to stand trial for helping a slave escape.

1857 – The Atlantic was founded in Boston.

1862 – American Civil War: Union General Ambrose Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, after George B. McClellan was removed.

1867 – Tokugawa Shogunate handed power back to the Emperor of Japan, starting the Meiji Restoration.

1868 Marie Dressler, Canadian actress, was born (d 1934) .

1872 – The Great Boston Fire of 1872.

1887 – The United States received rights to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1888 – Jack the Ripper killed Mary Jane Kelly, his last known victim.

1902 Anthony Asquith, British film director, was born (d 1968).

1906 – Theodore Roosevelt was the first sitting USA president to make an official trip outside the country. He did so to inspect progress on the Panama Canal.

1907 – The Cullinan Diamond was presented to King Edward VII on his birthday.

1913 – The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, the most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, destroyed 19 ships and killed more than 250 people.

1914 – SMS Emden was sunk by HMAS Sydney in the Battle of Cocos.

1917 – Joseph Stalin entered the provisional government of Bolshevik Russia.

1918 – Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany abdicated after the German Revolution, and Germany was proclaimed a Republic.

1918 Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born (d1996).

1920 The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 made it necessary for immigrants to apply for a permanent residence permit before they arrived in New Zealand, which in effect introduced a white New Zealand policy.

White New Zealand policy introduced

1921 – Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with the photoelectric effect.

1923 – In Munich, Germany, police and government troops crushed the Beer Hall Putsch in Bavaria.

1932 – Riots between conservative and socialist supporters in Switzerland killed 12 and injured 60.

1936 Mary Travers,  singer, (Peter, Paul & Mary), was born (d 2009).

1937 Roger McGough, English poet, was born.

1937 – Japanese troops took control of Shanghai.

1938 – Nazi German diplomat Ernst vom Rath died from the fatal gunshot wounds of Jewish resistance fighter Herschel Grynszpan, an act which the Nazis used as an excuse to instigate the 1938 national pogrom, Kristallnacht.

1940 – Warsaw was awarded the Virtuti Militari.

1953 – Cambodia gained independence from France.

1955 – Karen Dotrice, British actress, was born.

1960 – Robert McNamara was named president of Ford Motor Co., the first non-Ford to serve in that post.

1963 – At Miike coal mine, Japan, an explosion killed 458, and hospitalised 839 with carbon monoxide poisoning.

1963 – A three-train disaster in Yokohama, killed more than 160 people.

1965 – Several U.S. states and parts of Canada were hit by a series of blackouts lasting up to 13 hours in the Northeast Blackout of 1965.

1965 – Catholic Worker member Roger Allen LaPorte, protesting against the Vietnam War, set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building.

1967 – Apollo program: NASA launches the unmanned Apollo 4 test spacecraft atop the first Saturn V rocket from Cape Kennedy, Florida.

1967 – First issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published.

1970 – Vietnam War: The Supreme Court of the United States voted 6 to 3 against hearing a case to allow Massachusetts to enforce its law granting residents the right to refuse military service in an undeclared war.

1979 – Nuclear false alarm: the NORAD computers and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland detected purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and checking the early warning radars, the alert is cancelled.

1985 – Garry Kasparov 22, of the Soviet Union became the youngest World Chess Champion by beating Anatoly Karpov, also of the Soviet Union.

1989 – Fall of the Berlin Wall. Communist-controlled East Germany opened checkpoints in the Berlin Wall allowing its citizens to travel to West Germany.

1990 – New democratic constitution was issued in Nepal.

1993 – Stari most, the “old bridge” in Bosnian Mostar built in 1566, collapsed after several days of bombing.

1994 – The chemical element Darmstadtium was discovered.

1998 – Brokerage houses were ordered to pay $US1.03 billion to cheated NASDAQ investors to compensate for their price-fixing. This is the largest civil settlement in United States history.

1998 – Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, already abolished for murder, was completely abolished for all remaining capital offences.

2005 – The Venus Express mission of the European Space Agency was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

2005 – Suicide bombers attacked three hotels in Amman, Jordan, killing at least 60 people.

2007 – The German Bundestag passed the controversial data retention bill mandating storage of citizens’ telecommunications traffic data for six months without probable cause.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


November 9 in history

November 9, 2012

694 – Egica, a king of the Visigoths of Hispania, accused Jews of aiding Muslims, sentencing all Jews to slavery.

1282 – Pope Martin IV excommunicated King Peter III of Aragon.

1313 – Louis the Bavarian defeated his cousin Frederick I of Austria at the Battle of Gamelsdorf.

1330 – Battle of Posada, Wallachian Voievode Basarab I defeated the Hungarian army in an ambush.

1456 – Ulrich II of Celje last prince of Celje principality, was assassinated in Belgrade.

1492 – Peace of Etaples between Henry VII and Charles VIII.

1494 – The Family de’ Medici were expelled from Florence.

1620 – Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sighted land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

1688 – The Glorious Revolution: William of Orange captured Exeter.

1720 – The synagogue of Yehudah he-Hasid was burned down by Arab creditors, leading to the expulsion of the Ashkenazim from Jerusalem.

1729 – Spain, France and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Seville.

1764 – Mary Campbell, a captive of the Lenape during the French and Indian War, was turned over to forces commanded by Colonel Henry Bouquet.

1769 – Captain Cook and astronomer Charles Green observed the transit of Mercury at Te Whanganui-a-hei (Mercury Bay) on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Captain Cook observes transit of Mercury

1791 – Foundation of the Dublin Society of United Irishmen.

1799 – Napoleon Bonaparte led the Coup d’état of 18 Brumaire ending the Directory government, and becoming one of its three Consuls (Consulate Government).

1841 King Edward VII was born (d. 1910).

1851 – Kentucky marshals abducted abolitionist minister Calvin Fairbank from Jeffersonville, Indiana, and took him to Kentucky to stand trial for helping a slave escape.

1857 – The Atlantic was founded in Boston.

1862 – American Civil War: Union General Ambrose Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, after George B. McClellan was removed.

1867 – Tokugawa Shogunate handed power back to the Emperor of Japan, starting the Meiji Restoration.

1868 Marie Dressler, Canadian actress, was born (d 1934) .

1872 – The Great Boston Fire of 1872.

1887 – The United States received rights to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1888 – Jack the Ripper killed Mary Jane Kelly, his last known victim.

1902 Anthony Asquith, British film director, was born (d 1968).

1906 – Theodore Roosevelt was the first sitting USA president to make an official trip outside the country. He did so to inspect progress on the Panama Canal.

1907 – The Cullinan Diamond was presented to King Edward VII on his birthday.

1913 – The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, the most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, destroyed 19 ships and killed more than 250 people.

1914 – SMS Emden was sunk by HMAS Sydney in the Battle of Cocos.

1917 – Joseph Stalin entered the provisional government of Bolshevik Russia.

1918 – Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany abdicated after the German Revolution, and Germany was proclaimed a Republic.

1918 Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born (d1996).

1920 The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 made it necessary for immigrants to apply for a permanent residence permit before they arrived in New Zealand, which in effect introduced a white New Zealand policy.

White New Zealand policy introduced

1921 – Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with the photoelectric effect.

1923 – In Munich, Germany, police and government troops crushed the Beer Hall Putsch in Bavaria.

1932 – Riots between conservative and socialist supporters in Switzerland killed 12 and injured 60.

1936 Mary Travers ,  singer, (Peter, Paul & Mary), was born (d 2009).

1937 Roger McGough, English poet, was born.

1937 – Japanese troops took control of Shanghai.

1938 – Nazi German diplomat Ernst vom Rath died from the fatal gunshot wounds of Jewish resistance fighter Herschel Grynszpan, an act which the Nazis used as an excuse to instigate the 1938 national pogrom, Kristallnacht.

1940 – Warsaw was awarded the Virtuti Militari.

1953 – Cambodia gained independence from France.

1955 – Karen Dotrice, British actress, was born.

1960 – Robert McNamara was named president of Ford Motor Co., the first non-Ford to serve in that post.

1963 – At Miike coal mine, Japan, an explosion killed 458, and hospitalised 839 with carbon monoxide poisoning.

1963 – A three-train disaster in Yokohama, killed more than 160 people.

1965 – Several U.S. states and parts of Canada were hit by a series of blackouts lasting up to 13 hours in the Northeast Blackout of 1965.

1965 – Catholic Worker member Roger Allen LaPorte, protesting against the Vietnam War, set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building.

1967 – Apollo program: NASA launches the unmanned Apollo 4 test spacecraft atop the first Saturn V rocket from Cape Kennedy, Florida.

1967 – First issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published.

1970 – Vietnam War: The Supreme Court of the United States voted 6 to 3 against hearing a case to allow Massachusetts to enforce its law granting residents the right to refuse military service in an undeclared war.

1979 – Nuclear false alarm: the NORAD computers and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland detected purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and checking the early warning radars, the alert is cancelled.

1985 – Garry Kasparov 22, of the Soviet Union became the youngest World Chess Champion by beating Anatoly Karpov, also of the Soviet Union.

1989 – Fall of the Berlin Wall. Communist-controlled East Germany opened checkpoints in the Berlin Wall allowing its citizens to travel to West Germany.

1990 – New democratic constitution was issued in Nepal.

1993 – Stari most, the “old bridge” in Bosnian Mostar built in 1566, collapsed after several days of bombing.

1994 – The chemical element Darmstadtium was discovered.

1998 – Brokerage houses were ordered to pay $US1.03 billion to cheated NASDAQ investors to compensate for their price-fixing. This is the largest civil settlement in United States history.

1998 – Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, already abolished for murder, was completely abolished for all remaining capital offences.

2005 – The Venus Express mission of the European Space Agency was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

2005 – Suicide bombers attacked three hotels in Amman, Jordan, killing at least 60 people.

2007 – The German Bundestag passed the controversial data retention bill mandating storage of citizens’ telecommunications traffic data for six months without probable cause.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


November 9 in history

November 9, 2011

694 – Egica, a king of the Visigoths of Hispania, accused Jews of aiding Muslims, sentencing all Jews to slavery.

1282 – Pope Martin IV excommunicated King Peter III of Aragon.

 

1313 – Louis the Bavarian defeated his cousin Frederick I of Austria at the Battle of Gamelsdorf.

 

1330 – Battle of Posada, Wallachian Voievode Basarab I defeated the Hungarian army in an ambush.

 

1456 – Ulrich II of Celje last prince of Celje principality, was assassinated in Belgrade.

1492 – Peace of Etaples between Henry VII and Charles VIII.

1494 – The Family de’ Medici were expelled from Florence.

 

1620 – Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sighted land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

 

1688 – The Glorious Revolution: William of Orange captured Exeter.

 

1720 – The synagogue of Yehudah he-Hasid was burned down by Arab creditors, leading to the expulsion of the Ashkenazim from Jerusalem.

1729 – Spain, France and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Seville.

1764 – Mary Campbell, a captive of the Lenape during the French and Indian War, was turned over to forces commanded by Colonel Henry Bouquet.

 

1769 – Captain Cook and astronomer Charles Green observed the transit of Mercury at Te Whanganui-a-hei (Mercury Bay) on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Captain Cook observes transit of Mercury

1791 – Foundation of the Dublin Society of United Irishmen.

 

1799 – Napoleon Bonaparte led the Coup d’état of 18 Brumaire ending the Directory government, and becoming one of its three Consuls (Consulate Government).

1841 King Edward VII was born (d. 1910).

 

1851 – Kentucky marshals abducted abolitionist minister Calvin Fairbank from Jeffersonville, Indiana, and took him to Kentucky to stand trial for helping a slave escape.

 

1857 – The Atlantic was founded in Boston.

 

1862 – American Civil War: Union General Ambrose Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, after George B. McClellan was removed.

 

1867 – Tokugawa Shogunate handed power back to the Emperor of Japan, starting the Meiji Restoration.

1868 Marie Dressler, Canadian actress, was born (d 1934) .

 

1872 – The Great Boston Fire of 1872.

 

1887 – The United States received rights to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1888 – Jack the Ripper killed Mary Jane Kelly, his last known victim.

1902 Anthony Asquith, British film director, was born (d 1968).

 

1906 – Theodore Roosevelt was the first sitting USA president to make an official trip outside the country. He did so to inspect progress on the Panama Canal.

1907 – The Cullinan Diamond was presented to King Edward VII on his birthday.

 

1913 – The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, the most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, destroyed 19 ships and killed more than 250 people.

 

1914 – SMS Emden was sunk by HMAS Sydney in the Battle of Cocos.

 

1917 – Joseph Stalin entered the provisional government of Bolshevik Russia.

 

1918 – Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany abdicated after the German Revolution, and Germany was proclaimed a Republic.

 

1918 Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born (d1996).

 

1920 The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 made it necessary for immigrants to apply for a permanent residence permit before they arrived in New Zealand, which in effect introduced a white New Zealand policy.

White New Zealand policy introduced

1921 – Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with the photoelectric effect.

 

1923 – In Munich, Germany, police and government troops crushed the Beer Hall Putsch in Bavaria.

1932 – Riots between conservative and socialist supporters in Switzerland killed 12 and injured 60.

1936 Mary Travers was born (Peter, Paul & Mary), was born (d 2009).

 

1937 Roger McGough, English poet, was born.

1937 – Japanese troops took control of Shanghai.

1938 – Nazi German diplomat Ernst vom Rath died from the fatal gunshot wounds of Jewish resistance fighter Herschel Grynszpan, an act which the Nazis used as an excuse to instigate the 1938 national pogrom, Kristallnacht.

 

1940 – Warsaw was awarded the Virtuti Militari.

 

1953 – Cambodia gained independence from France.

1955 – Karen Dotrice, British actress, was born.

 

1960 – Robert McNamara is named president of Ford Motor Co., the first non-Ford to serve in that post.

1963 – At Miike coal mine, Japan, an explosion kills 458, and hospitalises 839 with carbon monoxide poisoning.

1963 – A three-train disaster in Yokohama, killed more than 160 people.

1965 – Several U.S. states and parts of Canada were hit by a series of blackouts lasting up to 13 hours in the Northeast Blackout of 1965.

1965 – Catholic Worker member Roger Allen LaPorte, protesting against the Vietnam War, set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building.

1967 – Apollo program: NASA launches the unmanned Apollo 4 test spacecraft atop the first Saturn V rocket from Cape Kennedy, Florida.

 

1967 – First issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published.

1970 – Vietnam War: The Supreme Court of the United States voted 6 to 3 against hearing a case to allow Massachusetts to enforce its law granting residents the right to refuse military service in an undeclared war.

1979 – Nuclear false alarm: the NORAD computers and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland detected purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and checking the early warning radars, the alert is cancelled.

1985 – Garry Kasparov 22, of the Soviet Union became the youngest World Chess Champion by beating Anatoly Karpov, also of the Soviet Union.

 

1989 – Fall of the Berlin Wall. Communist-controlled East Germany opened checkpoints in the Berlin Wall allowing its citizens to travel to West Germany.

 

1990 – New democratic constitution was issued in Nepal.

1993 – Stari most, the “old bridge” in Bosnian Mostar built in 1566, collapsed after several days of bombing.

1994 – The chemical element Darmstadtium was discovered.

1998 – Brokerage houses were ordered to pay $US1.03 billion to cheated NASDAQ investors to compensate for their price-fixing. This is the largest civil settlement in United States history.

1998 – Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, already abolished for murder, was completely abolished for all remaining capital offences.

2005 – The Venus Express mission of the European Space Agency was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

 

2005 – Suicide bombers attacked three hotels in Amman, Jordan, killing at least 60 people.

2007 – The German Bundestag passed the controversial data retention bill mandating storage of citizens’ telecommunications traffic data for six months without probable cause.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


November 9 in history

November 9, 2010

On November 9:

694 – Egica, a king of the Visigoths of Hispania, accused Jews of aiding Muslims, sentencing all Jews to slavery.

1282 – Pope Martin IV excommunicated King Peter III of Aragon.

 

1313 – Louis the Bavarian defeated his cousin Frederick I of Austria at the Battle of Gamelsdorf.

1330 – Battle of Posada, Wallachian Voievode Basarab I defeated the Hungarian army in an ambush.

Molnár József Carol Robert fleeing from Posada Battle.jpg

1456 – Ulrich II of Celje last prince of Celje principality, was assassinated in Belgrade.

1492 – Peace of Etaples between Henry VII and Charles VIII.

1494 – The Family de’ Medici were expelled from Florence.

Coat of arms of the House of de' Medici.png

1620 – Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sighted land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

MayflowerHarbor.jpg

1688 – The Glorious Revolution: William of Orange captured Exeter.

 

1720 – The synagogue of Yehudah he-Hasid was burned down by Arab creditors, leading to the expulsion of the Ashkenazim from Jerusalem.

1729 – Spain, France and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Seville.

1764 – Mary Campbell, a captive of the Lenape during the French and Indian War, was turned over to forces commanded by Colonel Henry Bouquet.

 

1769 – Captain Cook and astronomer Charles Green observed the transit of Mercury at Te Whanganui-a-hei (Mercury Bay) on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Captain Cook observes transit of Mercury

1791 – Foundation of the Dublin Society of United Irishmen.

 

1799 – Napoleon Bonaparte led the Coup d’état of 18 Brumaire ending the Directory government, and becoming one of its three Consuls (Consulate Government).

 

1841 King Edward VII was born.

1851 – Kentucky marshals abducted abolitionist minister Calvin Fairbank from Jeffersonville, Indiana, and took him to Kentucky to stand trial for helping a slave escape.

1857 – The Atlantic was founded in Boston.

1862 – American Civil War: Union General Ambrose Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, after George B. McClellan was removed.

1867 – Tokugawa Shogunate handed power back to the Emperor of Japan, starting the Meiji Restoration.

1868  Marie Dressler, Canadian actress, was born.

1872 – The Great Boston Fire of 1872.

 

1887 – The United States received rights to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1888 – Jack the Ripper killed Mary Jane Kelly, his last known victim.

1902  Anthony Asquith, British film director, was born (d 1968).

1906 – Theodore Roosevelt was the first sitting USA president to make an official trip outside the country. He did so to inspect progress on the Panama Canal.

1907 – The Cullinan Diamond was presented to King Edward VII on his birthday.

Cullinanroughpieces.jpg

1913 – The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, the most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, destroyed 19 ships and killed more than 250 people.

 

1914 – SMS Emden was sunk by HMAS Sydney in the Battle of Cocos.

SMS Emden wreck.jpg

1917 – Joseph Stalin entered the provisional government of Bolshevik Russia.

1918 – Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany abdicates after the German Revolution, and Germany was proclaimed a Republic.

1918  Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born (d1996).

1920  The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 made it necessary for immigrants to apply for a permanent residence permit before they arrived in New Zealand, which in effect introduced a white New Zealand policy.

White New Zealand policy introduced

1921 – Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with the photoelectric effect.

1923 – In Munich, Germany, police and government troops crushed the Beer Hall Putsch in Bavaria.

1932 – Riots between conservative and socialist supporters in Switzerland killed 12 and injured 60.

1936 Mary Travers was born (Peter, Paul & Mary), was born (d 2009).

1937  Roger McGough, English poet, was born.

1937 – Japanese troops took control of Shanghai.

1938 – Nazi German diplomat Ernst vom Rath died from the fatal gunshot wounds of Jewish resistance fighter Herschel Grynszpan, an act which the Nazis used as an excuse to instigate the 1938 national pogrom, Kristallnacht.

 

1940 – Warsaw was awarded the Virtuti Militari.

Virtuti Militari Grand Cross.jpg

1953 – Cambodia gained independence from France.

1955 – Karen Dotrice, British actress, was born.

1960 – Robert McNamara is named president of Ford Motor Co., the first non-Ford to serve in that post.

 

1963 – At Miike coal mine, Japan, an explosion kills 458, and hospitalises 839 with carbon monoxide poisoning.

1963 – A three-train disaster in Yokohama, killed more than 160 people.

1965 – Several U.S. states and parts of Canada were hit by a series of blackouts lasting up to 13 hours in the Northeast Blackout of 1965.

1965 – Catholic Worker member Roger Allen LaPorte, protesting against the Vietnam War, set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building.

1967 – Apollo program: NASA launches the unmanned Apollo 4 test spacecraft atop the first Saturn V rocket from Cape Kennedy, Florida.

Apollo program insignia.png

1967 – First issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published.

1970 – Vietnam War: The Supreme Court of the United States voted 6 to 3 against hearing a case to allow Massachusetts to enforce its law granting residents the right to refuse military service in an undeclared war.

1979 – Nuclear false alarm: the NORAD computers and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland detected purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and checking the early warning radars, the alert is cancelled.

1985 – Garry Kasparov 22, of the Soviet Union became the youngest World Chess Champion by beating Anatoly Karpov, also of the Soviet Union.

Kasparov-29.jpg

1989 –  Fall of the Berlin Wall. Communist-controlled East Germany opened checkpoints in the Berlin Wall allowing its citizens to travel to West Germany.

1990 – New democratic constitution was issued in Nepal.

1993 – Stari most, the “old bridge” in Bosnian Mostar built in 1566, collapsed after several days of bombing.

 

1994 – The chemical element Darmstadtium was discovered.

1998 – Brokerage houses were ordered to pay $US1.03 billion to cheated NASDAQ investors to compensate for their price-fixing. This is the largest civil settlement in United States history.

1998 – Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, already abolished for murder, was completely abolished for all remaining capital offences.

2005 – The Venus Express mission of the European Space Agency was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Venus Express in orbit.jpg

2005 – Suicide bombers attacked three hotels in Amman, Jordan, killing at least 60 people.

2007 – The German Bundestag passed the controversial data retention bill mandating storage of citizens’ telecommunications traffic data for six months without probable cause.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


January 22 in history

January 22, 2010

On January 22:

 1506 The first contingent of 150 Swiss Guards arrived at the Vatican.

1521 Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, opened the Diet of Worms.

1561 Sir Francis Bacon, English philosopher, was born.

1771 – Spain ceded Port Egmont in the Falkland Islands to England.
 
1788 George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (Lord Byron), English poet, was born.

1824 – Ashantis defeated British forces in the Gold Coast.

 Map of the Ashanti Region within Ghana

1840 The New Zealand Company’s first settler ship, the Aurora, arrived at Petone, marking the official commencement of the settlement that would eventually become Wellington.

 First European settlers arrive in Wellington

  1889 Columbia Phonograph was formed in Washington, D.C.

Columbia-logo.jpg

1899 Leaders of six Australian colonies met in Melbourne to discuss confederation.

1901 Edward VII was proclaimed King after the death of his mother, Queen Victoria.

1905 Bloody Sunday in St. Petersburg, beginning of the 1905 revolution.

1906 SS Valencia ran aground on rocks on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, killing more than 130.

 SS Valencia shipwreck, seen from one of the rescuing ships

1919 Act Zluky was signed, unifying the Ukrainian People’s Republic and the West Ukrainian National Republic.

 Signing of the Act Zluky, on the St. Sophia Square in Kiev.

1924 Ramsay MacDonald became the first Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

1927 First live radio commentary of a football match anywhere in the world, between Arsenal F.C. and Sheffield United at Highbury.

1931 Sir Isaac Isaacs was sworn in as the first Australian-born Governor-General of Australia.

1934 Graham Kerr, British-born, New Zealand chef, was born.

1940 John Hurt, English actor, was born.

1941 British and Commonwealth troops captured Tobruk from Italian forces during Operation Compass.

1946 Iran: Qazi Muhammad declared the independent people’s Republic of Mahabad at Chuwarchira Square in the Kurdish city of Mahabad. He was the new president; Hadschi Baba Scheich was the prime minister.

1946 – Creation of the Central Intelligence Group, forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency.

1952 The first Jet airliner, the de Havilland Comet, entered service for BOAC.

1957  Israel withdrew from the Sinai Peninsula.

1957 The New York City “Mad Bomber”, George P. Metesky, was arrested and charged with planting more than 30 bombs.

1959 Knox Mine Disaster: Water breaches the River Slope Mine near Pittston City, Pennsylvania in Port Griffith; 12 miners are killed.

1960 Michael Hutchence, Australian singer (INXS), was born.

1962 Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin of Terengganu, Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia, was born.

Yang di-pertuan agong ke-13.PNG

1963 The Elysée treaty of cooperation between France and Germany was signed by Charles de Gaulle and Konrad Adenauer.

1965 Steven Adler, American drummer (Guns N’ Roses), was born.

1968 Apollo 5 lifted off carrying the first Lunar module into space.

 LM1 embr original.jpg

1973  The Supreme Court of the United States delivered its decision in Roe v. Wade, legalizing elective abortion in all fifty states.

1984  The Apple Macintosh, the first consumer computer to popularize the computer mouse and the graphical user interface, was introduced during Super Bowl XVIII with its famous “1984” television commercial.

A beige, boxy computer with a small black and white screen showing a window and desktop with icons. 

1987  Pennsylvania politician R. Budd Dwyer shot and killed himself at a press conference on live national television, leading to debates on boundaries in journalism.

1990 Robert Tappan Morris, Jr. was convicted of releasing the 1988 Internet Computer worm.

 Disk containing the source code for the Morris Worm held at the Boston Museum of Science.

1992 Space Shuttle program: STS-42 Mission – Dr. Roberta Bondar became the first Canadian woman in space.

 Roberta Bondar NASA.jpg

1999 Australian missionary Graham Staines and his two sons were burned alive by radical Hindus while sleeping in their car in Eastern India.

2002 Kmart Corp beccame the largest retailer in United States history to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

2006 Evo Morales was inaugurated as President of Bolivia, becoming the country’s first indigenous president.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


November 9 in history

November 9, 2009

On November 9:

1494 The Family de’ Medici became rulers of Florence.

Armorial of Medici

1620 Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sighted land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

MayflowerHarbor.jpg

1769 Captain Cook observed the transit of Mercury.

1841 King Edward VII was born.

1857  The Atlantic magazine was founded in Boston.

1868  Marie Dressler, Canadian actress, was born.

1887 The United States received rights to Pearl Harbour, Hawaii.

1902  Anthony Asquith, British film director, was born.

1917 Joseph Stalin entered the provisional government of the USSR.

1918  Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany abdicated after the German Revolution, and Germany was proclaimed a Republic.

1918  Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born.

1920 White New Zealand policy  was introduced. The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 made it necessary for immigrants to apply for a permanent residence permit before they arrived in New Zealand.

1921 Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with the photoelectric effect..

1936 Mary Travers was born.

1937  Roger McGough, English poet, was born.

1953 Cambodia beccame independent from France.

1955 – Karen Dotrice, British actress


Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber
in a publicity photo for Mary Poppins

1967 The First issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published.

1989  Fall of the Berlin Wall. Communist-controlled East Germany opened checkpoints in the Berlin Wall allowing its citizens to travel to West Germany. People started demolishing the Berlin Wall.

View in 1986 from the west side of graffiti art on the wall’s infamous “death strip”

1994 The chemical element Darmstadtium was discovered.

1998 Brokerage houses were ordered to pay 1.03 billion USD to cheated NASDAQ investors to compensate for their price-fixing.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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