Rural round-up

November 14, 2012

What does our agriculture offer?  romance and reassurance – Pasture Harmonies:

I’ll be the first to admit that the frilly, intangible, non-scientific aspects of what and how we produce our agricultural products can be a tricky little number to get your head around.

Much of what we’re good at doing as a nation is hard-edged, ‘proven’ – be it across on and off farm technical performance, engineering disciplines, the All Blacks even – all those things that you can measure and monitor.

But, for a moment let’s just sit and accept these quantifiable aspects.

What else does our agriculture offer? . . .

Chatham Rock Phosphate water turbidity model shows encouraging results:

Highly sophisticated computer models of the turbidity from material disturbed during extraction of rock phosphate nodules by Chatham Rock Phosphate have shown encouraging results.

The modelling work is being undertaken by Dutch applied research organisation Deltares using complex modelling techniques developed at their Delft headquarters. Deltares was asked to look at the dispersion behaviour of sediments released during the proposed extraction process.

The modelling results will now be independently evaluated. . .

Sheep in south heading for hills – Sally Rae:

More cows, more mixed farming systems involving dairy support and more finishing in the hill country.

That’s what Rabobank senior rural manager Richard Copland expects to see in the Gore area in the future.

Delivering the opening address at the New Zealand Grassland Association conference in Gore last week, Mr Copland outlined the “massive amount” of change in the district in recent years. . .

Queen gene selection top honey maker – Shawn McAvinue:

The process of breeding better queen bees began for the year in Mosgiel early last week.

Better Bees director David McMillan said drone bee semen was collected and mixed in the morning so queen bees could be artificially inseminated in the afternoon.

The same process would continue for three days so queen bees could sent to shareholders of the Dunedin company, he said Betta Bees assistant Diane Allan, from Balfour, said about 100 mature drone bees were needed daily to collect 20 microlitres of semen. . .

Peel Forest moving to ‘grass roots’ venison – Sandra Finnie:

PEEL Forest Estate owner Graham Carr is the first to admit there was room for improvement on his property, before he grasped the concept of environmentally sustainable deer farming.

It took a letter from Environment Canterbury because someone had “potted him” about dirty water coming off the property, to motivate him to “clean up his act”.

At a recent field day, well supported by friends and farmers, Mr Carr reflected on the the work he’d done in recent years towards his goal of fencing off 90 per cent of the farm by 2012 on one side of a road and how he has improved water quality. . .

Prince Charles and Federated Farmers Express Support for Campaign for Wool:

Fill your living environments with wool and do it in style. That was the message from the Campaign for Wool at Shear Brilliance on Monday and one that will continue to be passed on in the future.

The Campaign hosted HRH The Prince of Wales Monday, November 12 at Shear Brilliance – a wool showcase at The Cloud, Queens Wharf, Auckland. At the event, Prince Charles proudly wore his New Zealand wool suit and told exhibitors New Zealand is globally recognised for the quality of its wool.

The message that wool can fill more than just a closet was evident by the wide range of exhibitors and guests. The Campaign hosted dignitaries, VIPs from architectural, interior and related industries at this special exhibition. It was an opportunity to show New Zealand’s creativity and innovation with woollen textiles and products. . .

Glacial Wool Fit for a Prince:

To honour the Prince of Wales and recognise his role as champion and patron of the global Campaign for Wool, a unique six square metre rug bearing his coat of arms is being hand- crafted in Christchurch from New Zealand Glacial wool by leading New Zealand wool exporter New Zealand Wool Services International.

“The Prince of Wales is the most significant sheep farmer in the United Kingdom and the world’s foremost advocate for wool. He launched the international Campaign for Wool in 2010 to educate the world about the extraordinary benefits and versatility of wool in furnishings, fashion and everyday life”, said Michael Dwyer, managing director, New Zealand Wool Services International. . .

And from  Smile Project:

Photo

Kurow to celebrate birth of social security

August 1, 2008

Kurow is preparing to celebrate the birth of social security which began in the town in the 1930s.

The 1938 Social Security Act developed from the medical benefits scheme for depression workers on the Waitaki hydro dam project at Kurow a few years earlier.

The act was developed by the local minister, Reverend Arnold Nordmeyer, headmaster Andrew Davidson and Dr David McMillan assited by a committee of locals. The success of the scheme convinced Nordmeyer and McMillan to stand with the new Labour leader, Michael Joseph Savage and became part of New Zealand’s first Labour Government.

Celebrations On Augsut 12 will include the launch of Nordy – Arnold Nordmeyer – A political Biography, by Mary Logan; and the official opening of the first stage of the National Museum of Social Security; the 1938 themed visitor information centre at the town’s museum; the Social Security Heritage Trail and the visitor information booklet Birth of Social Security – How It All Began.


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