Two killed at WINZ office

September 1, 2014

Two people are dead and another seriously injured after being shot in the Ashburton WINZ office:

 

. . . A balaclava-clad man carrying a sawn-off shotgun entered the Work and Income office on the corner of Cass and Moore streets and fired several shots before fleeing on a bike.

The gunman was last seen heading towards the Ashburton river. Shots have reportedly been heard since coming from the river. 

A source told Fairfax Media that one person was shot dead on site and another died at Ashburton Hospital.

Police confirmed that two people had been killed and the third person was in hospital. . . .

This is firstly a tragedy for those who died, their family friends and workmates.

It is also a shock for the community and other public servants:

Ashburton District Mayor Angus McKay said he felt “weak at the knees” when he heard about the shooting at the town’s Work and Income office.

“Ashburton is not this kind of town,” he said.

Social Development Minister Paula Bennett called it “an extreme situation and tragedy”, adding that all resources were going into looking after WINZ staff.

She was travelling down to the town this afternoon.

Public Service Association (PSA) said the shooting was a tragedy and nobody should go to work in fear that they might not return home. 

PSA National Secretary Richard Wagstaff said “Our thoughts are with all those affected by this tragedy,”

“We don’t know what the cause is, but we will be supporting our members from Ashburton Work and Income at this terrible time. . . .

This has already been used for political point scoring on Twitter.

It shouldn’t be.

No political views justify killing innocent people at work.

It’s a tragedy.


Richard Attenborough 29.8.23 – 24.8.14

August 25, 2014

British actor and film director Richard Attenborough has died.

 

Oscar-winning British film director Richard Attenborough has died at the age of 90, his son has said.

Lord Attenborough was one of Britain’s leading actors, before becoming a highly successful director.

In a career that spanned six decades, he appeared in films including Brighton Rock, World War Two prisoner of war thriller The Great Escape and later in dinosaur blockbuster Jurassic Park.

As a director he was perhaps best known for Gandhi, which won him two Oscars. . . .

 

 


Caring for the dying

August 19, 2014

Life is fatal.

Sooner or later we all die.

Most would choose for it to be later,  peaceful and pain-free.

But life and death aren’t always that well-ordered.

It isn’t easy watching someone we love die and not everyone is able to give their loved ones the care they need while dying.

This is where hospices come in.

They provide a very high standard of palliative care in their facilities and in the community for people who choose to die at home.

Their care is not just for the dying but for those who will survive them.

Hospices help the dying live well for as long as they can then help them die well without either prolonging or hastening the death.

The success of the work they do provides a very strong argument against euthanasia.

Theirs is difficult but essential service and the funding boost National has pledged will help hospices and their staff do more.

 

Hospices make a huge difference to people’s lives, so National will invest an extra $20 million a year so they can do even more of their important work. ntnl.org.nz/1kA7vLl #Working4NZ

We’ll invest in 60 new palliative care nurse specialist and educator roles to improve training and support across aged residential care, GP practices and home-based support services. ntnl.org.nz/1kA7vLl #Working4NZ


Robin Williams 21.7.51 – 11.814

August 12, 2014

Actor Robin Williams has died.

. . . According to his publicist, who confirmed the news, the actor had been battling depression of late and recently entered 12-step rehab stint for drug abuse.

His wife Susan Schneider said in a statement, “I am utterly heartbroken. On behalf of Robin’s family, we are asking for privacy during our time of profound grief. As he is remembered, it is our hope the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions…

How very sad that someone who moved so many with his performances and brought so much laughter to his many fans should have been plagued by, and succumbed to  depression.


MH 17

July 18, 2014

The deaths of nearly 300 people on Malaysian Airlines MH 17 is a tragedy.

It is worst for the family and friends of those who died.

It is also very bad for the airline although at this stage it appears the plane was shot down which is quite different from the mystery disappearance of MH 370.

We also need to remember this is a war zone where innocent people are killed every day.

 


Patsy Byrne 13.7.33 – 17.6.14

June 22, 2014

British actress Patsy Byrne who played Nursie in Blackadder has died.


Casey Kasem – 27.4.32 – 15.6.14

June 16, 2014

The man who counted down the American Top-40 for decades, Casey Kasem, has died.

Kasem was already a popular disc jockey in Los Angeles when he became the host of “American Top 40″ in 1970. The syndicated show, which counted down the 40 most popular songs in the United States based on Billboard magazine’s Hot 100 music chart, began on just seven radio stations but quickly became a mainstay of thousands, all around the world.

“When we first went on the air, I thought we would be around for at least 20 years. I knew the formula worked. I knew people tuned in to find out what the No. 1 record was,” he told Variety in 1989.

Kasem’s first No. 1, concluding the “AT40″ premiere show of July 4, 1970, was Three Dog Night’s “Mama Told Me (Not to Come).” His last on successor show “American Top 20,” almost exactly 39 years later, was “Second Chance” by Shinedown.

But the show wasn’t just about finding out who was No. 1.

Its features, included biographical details on performs, flashbacks, album cuts and Kasem’s “long-distance dedication” for listeners who wrote to dedicate songs to friends and loved ones far away.

Kasem, whose baritone was always friendly and upbeat, delivered these in his most sympathetic voice, warm enough to melt butter. “Dear Casey,” he began, and would read an emotional letter from a listener who wanted to connect with an old flame, express regret to a new love or send wishes to a far-flung family member.

The first one, for example, was from a male listener who wanted to dedicate Neil Diamond’s “Desiree” to a sweetheart named Desiree who was moving to Germany.

The show, originally three hours, expanded to four in the late ’70s. . .

My family,a nd those of many of my firends, didn’t have television in the early 70s.

We listened to the radio and Kasem’s show was one of those we listened to most weeks.

 


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