Caring for the dying

August 19, 2014

Life is fatal.

Sooner or later we all die.

Most would choose for it to be later,  peaceful and pain-free.

But life and death aren’t always that well-ordered.

It isn’t easy watching someone we love die and not everyone is able to give their loved ones the care they need while dying.

This is where hospices come in.

They provide a very high standard of palliative care in their facilities and in the community for people who choose to die at home.

Their care is not just for the dying but for those who will survive them.

Hospices help the dying live well for as long as they can then help them die well without either prolonging or hastening the death.

The success of the work they do provides a very strong argument against euthanasia.

Theirs is difficult but essential service and the funding boost National has pledged will help hospices and their staff do more.

 

Hospices make a huge difference to people’s lives, so National will invest an extra $20 million a year so they can do even more of their important work. ntnl.org.nz/1kA7vLl #Working4NZ

We’ll invest in 60 new palliative care nurse specialist and educator roles to improve training and support across aged residential care, GP practices and home-based support services. ntnl.org.nz/1kA7vLl #Working4NZ


NZ 1st for what matters

August 14, 2014

Labour, the Green party and their fellow travellers would have us believe that New Zealand is in a parlous state.

The Social Progress report shows otherwise – New Zealand is first in the world for social and environmental progress:

. . . The 2014 Social Progress Index reveals striking differences across countries in their social performance and highlights the very different strengths and weaknesses of individual countries.

The results provide concrete priorities for national policy agendas and identify other countries to learn from.

The top three countries in the world in terms of social progress are New Zealand, Switzerland, and Iceland. These three countries, closely grouped in terms of score, are relatively small in terms of populations. They score strongly across all social progress dimensions.

The remainder of the top ten includes a group of Northern European nations (Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark), Canada, and Australia. Together with the top three, these countries round out a distinct “top tier” of countries in terms of social progress scores. . .

New Zealand scored:

* 91.74  out of 100 for basic human needs, which rated nutrition and basic medical care. the only relative weakness was in this area – for maternal mortality.

* 84.97 for foundations of wellbeing which rated access to basic knowledge, access to information and communications, health and wellness and environmental sustainability.

* 88.01 for opportunity which rated personal rights, personal freedom and choice, tolerance and inclusion and access to advanced education.

This doesn’t mean New Zealand is perfect. There is room for improvement.

But we are doing relatively well  in social and environmental measures which are the ones many say matter far more than economic ones.

However, let us not forget that the sustainability of those depend on a strong economy.

It is no coincidence that countries which rate well in social and environmental areas also do well economically and the countries at the bottom don’t.

GDP alone doesn’t guarantee social progress but it provides a strong foundation for it.


Considerate flyer & a wellfesto

August 12, 2014

Discussion with Paul Brennan on Critical Mass today was sparked by:

* 8 ways to avoid being ‘that annoying passenger’ on a flight at Conde Nast Daily Traveler

and

* 10 Things I Want My Daughter to Know About Working Out at the Wellfesto (which is a blog manifesto for wellbeing).

This post was sparked by an experience at a gym where the work-out coach was exhorting the class to imagine how they’d look.

The writer knew she didn’t want her daughter to be thinking of appearance as a motivation to fitness, instead she wanted her to know:

1. Strength equals self-sufficiency. . .

2. Fitness opens doors. . .

3. The bike is the new golf course. 

4. Exercise is a lifestyle, not an event. . .

5. Health begets health

6.  The bike is the new golf course. . . .

7.  Working out signals hard-working. . . 

8. If you feel beautiful, you look beautiful. . .

9. Nature rules. . .

10. Little eyes are always watching. . .

 


Rural round-up

July 22, 2014

Lepto danger with flood waters:

RURAL WOMEN New Zealand  reminds Far North farming families to be mindful about health issues in dealing with flood waters, including the elevated risk of leptospirosis.

Families should be careful about drinking water, pull on their gumboots, wash hands and faces thoroughly, and cover cuts and grazes before they come into contact with flood water to reduce the chance of getting infections, in particular leptospirosis, Rural Women says.

The leptospirosis bacteria is shed in the urine from infected animals including stock, rodents, dogs, possums, and hedgehogs and is more easily spread about where there is excess surface water as the Far North is currently experiencing. . .

Free lunch for Northland farmers:

WHO SAYS there’s no such thing as a free lunch – or dinner, asks the Northland Rural Support Trust.

It is holding free lunch or dinners for flood-hit Northland starting tomorrow (Wednesday, July 23).

“We can’t stop it raining, but here’s a chance to have a dinner you don’t have to cook and an opportunity to talk to other storm affected folk plus pick the brains of some support people,” the Support Trust says to farmers.

Free food and drink is supplied at each event thanks to the trust and local merchants. . .

Stark difference between NZ and Australian dairying but why? – Pasture to Profit:

The visual & financial differences between the New Zealand & Australian dairy industries at the current time are stark and startling!

Why is the NZ dairy industry booming and Australian dairy farmers under so much pressure & having to dig deep to remain profitable. Both dairy industries supply into the same international market and Australia has a much bigger domestic population and local market. A strong local market is often argued as being a strength and likely to lift dairy farmers farm gate price. The economy in both countries is relatively strong & to a large extent was not greatly affected by the world financial crisis. Yet one dairy industry is hanging in by their fingernails while the other is buoyed (perhaps unrealistically!) by higher milk prices. . . .

AbacusBio finalist in sheep awards – Sally Rae:

Dunedin-based AbacusBio and its managing director Neville Jopson both feature among the finalists in this year’s Beef and Lamb New Zealand Sheep Industry Awards.

After being held in the South for the past two years, the awards have been shifted to Napier and will be held on August 6.

Dr Jopson is a finalist in one of two new categories – the sheep industry science award, which recognises a project, business or person undertaking science that is having a positive impact on farming. . .

Decision on effluent area reserved:

An Environment Southland hearing committee has reserved its decision on whether Southland meat processor South Pacific Meats (SPM) can spread effluent on to a larger area of farmland in northern Southland.

SPM, jointly owned by Affco New Zealand and Talleys Fisheries Ltd, opened a plant at Awarua, south of Invercargill, in 2005.

Last year, it gained consent from Environment Southland to spread sludge from the bottom of its wastewater treatment pond on to 55.5ha of a 1033ha sheep farm near Garston. . . .

Farms: the abuse of children –  A Farm Girl’s Fight:

Recently, I was reading some blogs and websites of organizations and individuals that oppose farmers. These websites have “facts” that are outrageous. Luckily, these facts have “sources” attached….that link back to their own website. Anyway, it’s humorous to me, and gives me ideas for my blogs. And let me tell you what. I am fired up.

There was a sentence on one of the websites (which no I will not link to their website) that stated:

“Farmers are awful people that often take advantage of underage children, often their own, forcing them into a life of work and learning of inhumane ways.”
Let me tell you something. With the exception of the “inhumane ways” addition, that statement is damn true and I am darn proud of it. . . .

 


Quota bad for health

July 21, 2014

Tim Worstall shows that public health campaigners  don’t understand economics:

. . . The European Union is taking the next step in reforming the entirely absurd sugar regime, making it marginally less awful. The public health wallahs are shouting that this might make sugar cheaper, to the point where everyone will explode from eating too much of it.

No, really:

Controversial agricultural reforms by the European Union could cause sugar levels in food and drink to rise, experts have warned.

Campaigners said it was “perverse” that the EU was planning to lift sugar production quotas at a time when health authorities are advising people to reduce their consumption of the ingredient. . . .

The move is expected to make sugar cheaper for food and drink manufacturers, prompting fears it will encourage them to use rising levels of the ingredient. Dr Aseem Malhotra, science director of Action on Sugar, a campaign group, said it would be “disastrous” for public health.

Oh dear.

They’ve really not understood what’s going on here at all.

In the nightmare world of EU agricultural policies the abolition of quota does not mean that prices are going to fall. For what actually happens is that if you grow sugar beet then there’s two prices which you can sell that deformed mangelwurzel to the processor at. One, a guaranteed one, much higher than a free market price, is only available if you have quota to go with your sugar beet. The other price is very much lower than a free market price and almost no one ever tries to grow beet without quota as a result.

The important point about the abolition of quota is not that it abolishes quota. It is that if there is no quota then beet with or without quota cannot gain that guaranteed price. Thus the price on offer to Europe’s sugar beet growers is going to fall: all other things being equal we’ll thus have less beet being grown. And thus less sugar being taken into storage and then subsidised by the EU when it is later dumped on the food manufacturers.

The abolition of quota will lead to less sugar being produced. And the public health campaigners are arguing against the abolition of quota to stop less sugar being produced. . .

Removing quota will not just have economic benefits, contrary to what the campaigners say, it could have health ones too.


Rural round-up

July 20, 2014

Back agriculture back our Roads:

Federated Farmers welcomes the Government’s announcement to increase investment in our deteriorating rural roads, but has concerns at whether it will be enough.

“A proposed increase of 4.3 percent per annum for local road improvements, and a 2.4 percent increase for local road maintenance, is long overdue but it remains to be seen whether it is enough.” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers Local Government Spokesperson.

“To date, the investment in our rural roads has not kept up with inflation and it is evident in each pot hole and/or goat track that farmers, families, school buses and contractors navigate everyday.

“We are pleased this is now being addressed but is it a sufficient recognition of the importance of roading to an economy reliant on primary production, and in turn it’s long rural roads? . . .

More places earmarked for rural medical students:

Health Minister Tony Ryall has today announced there will be an additional 34 medical places for students next year at our two medical schools, including more positions earmarked for rural students.

Mr Ryall made the announcement at Taumarunui Hospital, a busy rural health facility in the King Country with around 100 staff. 

“Research shows that students who grew up in rural areas, such as Taumarunui, are more likely to go back and work in those areas. These extra places will help encourage more doctors to work in our rural communities,” says Mr Ryall.

“Since 2009 this government has now funded 170 extra medical school places. . . .

New Zealand Seafood Industry Assures Australian Consumers that its Seafood is Sustainable:

The Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) list of imported fish that it’s telling consumers to stay away from, sounds like an ‘underarm delivery’ to the New Zealand industry.

Seafood New Zealand’s Chairman George Clement says it seems that the AMCS is has just gone through a list of imported seafood to arbitrarily warn people against most of it.

“Species by species, as we go through them, we can see how misinformed the AMCS report is. They’ve provided no transparent criteria nor openness in their assessments. There’s no indication that they have actually challenged themselves to examine the facts when they’ve drawn up their list.” . . .

Seafood New Zealand welcomes community funding for seabird conservation work:

Seafood New Zealand today welcomed Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith’s announcement that the Government will provide $300,000 of funding to two community groups to support their work in protecting some of New Zealand’s special seabirds.

The seafood industry is one of the founding partners in the Southern Seabird Solutions Trust which has received $100,000 towards a seabird smart recreational fishing initiative that aims to reduce the number of birds accidentally caught by recreational fishers in the upper North Island. . . .

From the last will and testament of a farmer c1986 – Gravedodger:

To my Wife,  my bank overdraft. Maybe she has an explanation for it.

To my Banker, I bequeath my soul, he has the mortgage on it anyway.

To my nearest and dearest neighbor, my clown suit, he claims he is going to carry on farming.

To The Rural Bank, my grain silo and my Fertilizer Bin, he has them as chattel security anyway.

To the local scrap metal dealer, every item of crap machinery I have gone to extraordinary lengths to keep from his possession. . . .

Otago woman named NZ’s top young amenity horticulturist:

New Zealand’s top young amenity horticulturist has been found after an intense day of competition at the Young Amenity Horticulturist of the Year event in Hamilton yesterday.

The annual competition is run by the New Zealand Recreation Association (NZRA) and serves as the qualifier for the prestigious Horticulturist of the Year competition, which will be hosted in Auckland in November.

Otago woman Sarah Fenwick emerged as the judge’s choice after planning, planting and potting her way to victory. The 30-year-old former vet nurse narrowly beat second place getter Josh van der Hulst, from Kamo, to take out the prize. . . .

Tax officials to work with bloodstock breeding industry:

Racing Minister Nathan Guy and Revenue Minister Todd McClay have confirmed that Inland Revenue officials will work with the New Zealand Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association on a number of tax issues raised by the industry.

The issues cover questions the NZTBA has over the application of tax rules for the industry and are expected to be dealt with as part of the normal consultative process between the private sector and tax officials.

“We are confident that the majority of the issues can be worked through, providing a positive result and greater certainty for what is an important industry to New Zealand,” Mr McClay says. . . .

Entries open for New Zealand’s largest A&P Show:

Show organisers for the 2014 Canterbury A&P Show are calling upon showing enthusiasts from throughout New Zealand to send in their entries and compete in the country’s largest Agricultural and Pastoral Show. For over 150 years, The Show has been attracting and showcasing New Zealand’s best animals and talented competitors. In addition to showing success, exhibitors will be competing for over $100,000 in prize money.

More than 3000 animals and close to 1000 competitors are expected to compete in 1700 classes including sections for horse and pony, beef and dairy cattle, sheep, alpaca, llama, wool, goat, dog trials, poultry, shearing and woolhandling, woodchopping and vintage machinery. Entries are also open for two of the feature competitions of The Show – the Mint Lamb Competition where New Zealand’s top lambs are put to a taste test, and the Young Auctioneers Competition where up-and-coming stock agents get to show off their skills. . . .


Rural round-up

July 1, 2014

A specialist land-based institution is essential for New Zealand :

Lincoln is New Zealand’s specialist land-based university. Its research and qualifications cover agriculture, yet also life sciences, conservation and ecology, environmental management, tourism, agribusiness, property management, and landscape architecture. This is a tried and true, and successful, model internationally.

Lincoln suffered in the aftermath of the Canterbury earthquakes.  It is now recovering. Unlike most other New Zealand universities, international student numbers at Lincoln are growing strongly, and domestic student numbers have been maintained over the last few years. This is most likely a reflection of the extremely high employment rate of Lincoln’s graduates, and the increasing demand for them as reflected in a recent Ministry of Primary Industries’ report.

The one or two recent opinion pieces regarding the university’s reorganisation are unfortunate, but perhaps not surprising. The University is strengthening its focus on its core purposes – to help Feed the world, Protect the future and help people Live well – and this has necessitated changes in the organisational structure and staffing of the institution, as well as its portfolio of qualifications. . . .

Landcorp considers business case for milking sheep – Pam Graham:

(BusinessDesk) – Landcorp, New Zealand’s largest corporate farmer, is having a serious look at milking sheep and will decide in a few months whether there is a business case for it.

Chief executive Steven Carden, who is about one year in the job, says the board gave him a broad mandate to look expansively at opportunities and milking sheep is one he has come up with.

Landcorp has a flock of about 850,000 ewes, none of which it milks, but it leases about 1,500 to Invercargill-based Blue River Dairy, an existing processor of sheep milk.

“Landcorp has been a very successful sheep farmer for many years,” Carden said. At present the state-owned company produces wool and meat but sees an opportunity in the sheep milk industry where there is no real international player. Sheep milk consumer products are established in many countries but they are largely produced domestically. . .

FE research to save farmers millions -

A partnership of CRV Ambreed and AgResearch is helping reduce the impact of facial eczema (FE) in dairy cattle by developing genetics that make cows more tolerant to the disease which costs the dairy industry $160 million a year.

The artificial breeding company and AgResearch were working together under the auspices of the Primary Growth Partnership (PGP).

CRV Ambreed genetic development strategist Phil Beatson said dairy farmers knew facial eczema was a cruel disease that could be incredibly stressful for cattle and an economic risk to their businesses through lowered milk production, weight loss, and stock deaths. . .

Cotton onBernard Lilburn:

Brothers Jono and Jack Lilburn from Manawatu were in a gang of six Kiwi blokes taking on the cotton harvest at Cubbie Station last summer. The numbers are huge, just like the machinery. Bernard Lilburn visited his sons to check out their day job.

The numbers around growing cotton in Australia are truly mind boggling. Contractor Steve O’Brien, based in Gunnedah in northern New South Wales, is a true blue Aussie and one that has some serious commitment to the cotton industry in his region. 

His “region” covers an area about the size of the North Island of New Zealand and he has four 7760 John Deere cotton pickers or round module balers (RMBs) with a replacement value of US$880,000 each! He usually replaces two every year. He also needs at least two 300 horse power tractors to pick up the bales as they come out of the pickers. . .

New pasture tool in the pipeline:

A NOVEL pasture meter jointly developed by English and Irish entrepreneurs was unveiled on the Enterprise Ireland stand at Fieldays.

The Grassometer uses four optical sensors to gauge pasture covers as the operator walks the farm. Its developers believe it is more accurate and convenient than the Platemeter or C-Dax now sold.

“The data is instantly transferred to your computer or smartphone as you walk the paddock and there’s no converting centimetres of pasture into kilogrammes of drymatter: it’s all done for you,” Sam Hoste, commercial manager of Monford Ag Systems, told Rural News. . . .

The Caveman Couch Potato: Lincoln researchers analyse the evolution of sedentary behaviour:

They are credited for the latest diet fads and lauded as exemplars of physical fitness, but were the cavemen and women of our distant past really the best examples of a healthy lifestyle?

The modern epidemic of obesity and disease is often blamed on the rise of a sedentary society, in which we alternate between sitting at the office and on the couch, with only a car ride in between. However, in a paper on ‘Sedentary behaviour and chronic disease’ published in Perspectives in Public Health, two Lincoln University researchers, Associate Professor  Mike Hamlin and Senior Lecturer Adrian Paterson have highlighted that modern society isn’t necessarily more sedentary than that of early hunter-gatherers. They also argue that sedentary behaviour has an important role in society that was as useful to our ancestors as it is today. . .


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