Purple Madona

December 25, 2013

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One time on Hollywood Boulevard I saw a young girl with a baby. It was a crisp winter morning & her hair shone dark purple in the sun. She was panhandling outside the Holiday Inn & the door clerk came out & told her to be on her way & I wondered if anyone would recognize the Christ child if they happened to meet. I remember thinking it’s not like there are any published pictures & purple seemed like a good colour for a Madonna so I gave her a dollar just in case.

Copyright 2012. Brian Andreas at StoryPeople.

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One time on Hollywood Boulevard...

Purple Madonna

©2013 Brian Andreas 

 

 

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If . . .

July 24, 2013

If you’d offered to host a dinner for six people as a lot in a charity auction what would you serve and/or if you’d made the winning bid what would you want to eat?

We made the offer for an auction at the local church fair last month.

The three couples who made the winning bid are coming on Saturday and I can’t decide what to serve.

They paid $400 and something in total.

Something better than ordinary is required and it would be preferable if most of the meal could be prepared before the guests arrived.


Please help a small surf lifesaving club

March 31, 2013

A friend has asked me to spread the word and solicit votes for Warrington Surf Lifesaving Club:

BP is running a nationwide competition for Surf Life Saving, where an IRB (Inflatable Rescue boat) is the prize for the club with the most votes. Warrington Surf Club was leading the votes, since a campaign was kick started by Columba College, after the incident at Purakunui, when the IRB from their club was used.

The boats are worth $25,000 and for a small club like Warrington, this would mean lots of raffles, sausages sizzles and quiz nights to raise the money to buy one.

Please support Warrington and go on-line and vote for Warrington Surf Lifesaving Club, and to pass this on to friends, workmates and family for their votes (voting closes on Sunday March 31, so not long to go!). One vote per email address, so multiple emails equals multiple votes.

Please visit www.bpsurflifesaving.co.nz select Southern Region and then Warrington SLSC. 

 


Janet Frame’s house needs help

January 27, 2013

I’m doing my annual stint as receptionist at Janet Frame’s childhood home in Oamaru.

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The first two visitors were from the Netherlands. They had read about the house in a book called New Zealand Detours and that is why they came to Oamaru.

The next visitors were four older women from Dunedin.

One of them stepped inside the door, stopped and said, “I’ve dreamed of coming here but never thought I would.”

She didn’t know Janet personally but loves her poetry.

As I type a couple from England are taking their time wandering through the rooms, soaking up the atmosphere.

The house was gifted to a trust and is maintained by volunteers.

The Trust has a plea:

Like all veterans of a certain age there comes a time when the usual day to day care is not enough to sustain you.  Our wonderful haven celebrating Janet Frame is showing her age and needs more than a little TLC.

We are extremely grateful for support we receive from friends, donors and visitors and these contributions help us with the day to day expenses each year.  Earlier last year it was discovered that the window frames all needed replacing as they were rotten then later in 2012 much to our horror it was discovered the plumbing needed extensive repairs as well.

We are trying to raise $6000 to cover the repairs bills for both sets of repairs and to tidy up after them.

Give a little is an approved charitable platform, now sponsored by Telecom.  This sponsorship means every cent donated goes to the cause you intended it for.  It is also a secure site that transfers the funds safely to the charity.

We are asking  the community of support for 56 Eden Street to ‘give a little’ to enable us to fundraise the amount to repair the property and keep it available to visit and store memories.

Please visit Give a Little on this link and donate to Fix our House http://www.givealittle.co.nz/cause/fixourhouse  by clicking on the blue  Donate now button about the middle of your screen.

The Janet Frame Eden Street Trust is a registered charity and all donations are tax deductible.  A receipt can be downloaded on the spot.

I hope you pause from your day to day and help us keep this wonderful property safe and open to the public.

The Trustees of the Janet Frame Eden Street Trust.


Re-gift or sell

December 27, 2012

There’s always been re-gifting – passing on a gift you don’t want to someone else.

Now there’s TradeMe:

The Boxing Day ritual that sees thousands of Christmas presents re-emerge on Trade Me is under way, as Kiwis seek to find a new home for unwrapped items they don’t like, won’t use, or already have.

More than 20,000 items had landed on Trade Me since lunchtime on Christmas Day, and spokesman Paul Ford said the online marketplace provided people with an opportunity to recycle a gift, and make some pocket money along the way.

“Yesterday most of us will have received at least one gift that made us groan inwardly, but if you can’t exchange it then selling it to someone who genuinely wants it is often a better option than hiding it in the back of the wardrobe, sending it off to the dump, or awkwardly passing it on at Christmas next year.” . .

There is another option for unwanted gifts – passing them on to a charity shop.

Mr Ford said there were “regular offenders” that routinely turned up on site having missed the mark on Christmas Day. “These are often over-ambitious purchases on the lingerie front by both men and women, and items like books, ties, handbags and kitchen appliances all commonly crop up.”

But should we feel guilty about not keeping something we’ve been given?

The social taboo about recycling unwanted presents still remained, but was felt more keenly by gift receivers than by gift givers, according to research from the London Business School. “Receivers often over-estimate how offensive regifting is to the initial giver,” Mr Ford said. “But for givers, selecting and offering a gift is much more important than getting bitter and twisted about what happens to it after it’s been unwrapped.”

I’ve no doubt given gifts I thought were good ideas when buying them which might not be thought to be so good by those receiving them.

There are others that go out of fashion or just have passed their enjoy-by date.

I’d rather the recipients gave them away or sold them than held on to them unwillingly just because they were gifts.


About that trust

December 7, 2012

Susan Couch, the victim of a vicious attack in which her work mates were killed, has accepted the payment of $300,000 from the Corrections Department to settle her claim for exemplary damages.

Officer of Corrections, Ray Smith has said, the department is “doing right by Sue and her family”.

Compensation is only available in New Zealand via the ACC legislation…Sue is a social welfare beneficiary as ACC legislation does not provide her with adequate support” said Brian Henry.

ACC is not injury based compensation; it is salary based compensation.

Susan will continue the fight for compensation, which now moves to a campaign to change the ACC legislation so that victims, especially women, receive a fair outcome. . .

That is not a lot of money given the severity of her injuries which were inflicted by a man  with a string of violent convictions who was on parole.

I want to thank all my supporters over the past 11 years, especially Garth Mc Vicar and Sensible Sentencing Trust for the huge support I have received from them over those years”.

I also especially wish thank Winston Peters for the donation that established the Susan Couch Victims Trust, which helps all victims of violent crime”.

Ah yes, that trust.

That’s the one which was established with  some of the $158,000 New Zealand First owes taxpayers after spending parliamentary services’ funds on its 2005 election campaign.

I don’t begrudge Ms Couch any money. She is disabled as a result of her injuries and isn’t eligible for much compensation through ACC.

But the trust was established with money which ought to have been used to pay back parliamentary services.

Given that, we have a right to know how much it gave her and what other donations the trust has made.


Not such a quick dash

December 2, 2012

What was meant to be a quick dash into town to get my weekly fix of fine food from the Oamaru Farmers’ Market led me on a detour.

A friend at the market told me she’d just been to a house of flowers and I ought to go too.

It was a fundraising collaboration between Altrusa and floral artists.

The house and garden hosting the event were attractive to start with and the lawns and each room had been enhanced with stunning arrangements of flowers. Some had Christmas themes, all were amazing.

We were asked not to take photos so I can’t share any with you, but my mind’s eye is still full of beautiful floral pictures.

The quick dash to town took a lot longer than I’d planned but the detour was well worth the extra time.

 


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